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Old 03-01-2019, 11:07 PM
 
438 posts, read 163,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Is this a joke alluding to all English words have vowels or was some part missing?
meant words with A and O vowels
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:08 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Yes I can. Aboot. Soary. Agaynst. Eh. Words you’ll hear within five minutes of speaking to a Canadian.

And they tend to be really good people. Seriously, some of the best people I know are Canadian. Always an indicator.

Now, I can’t spot them from a distance if that’s what you mean. Unless they have a big maple leaf shirt or something and even then, could still be an American.
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:28 PM
 
438 posts, read 163,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post

Also Asian in DFW, I met several other Korean Americans who grew up in Alberta, Vancouver, and the Toronto area. Ranging from people who moved to the US at 7 years of ago to the low 30s. Aside from vocabulary differences, such as y'all, I don't think any of them speak very differently than the natives or domestic migrants to the region. Or, at least, not any more distinctively.
Hear how Fung Brothers (from Seattle) on Youtube and their peers speak. Canadian-born Asians don't speak like that. I'm also not saying all American-Asians (such as myself) speak like Fung Bros, or have a slight wannabe gangsta/ street edge to their speech. But it is nonetheless distinctively American accent.
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:40 PM
 
1,508 posts, read 524,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krosser100 View Post
That bolded here shows that your ears are not attuned to linguistic differences.

Racial differences. You are Asian right? I am too, I can assure you American-born Asians from California have a notably different accent from Canadian-born Asians.
I have cousins in Canada who said Asians in California "Sound ghetto" to their ears. I myself don't think so (sounding ghetto), but I do know what "they mean" and I agree there is a difference.
Not as different as between Black Canadians and African-Americans, of course though.
I am Chinese. However, I have a more "white American" accent than most of my fellow American-born Chinese (ironically, because I actually speak and read/write Chinese better than most American-born Chinese).
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Old 03-02-2019, 08:01 AM
 
6,504 posts, read 4,082,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Yes I can. Aboot. Soary. Agaynst. Eh. Words you’ll hear within five minutes of speaking to a Canadian.
Proe-gress. To-more-row. Add-ult. All very distinctive. But I agree with the poster who said one has to be listening; the general tendency is to ignore minor details of accents and focus on the message.
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Old 03-02-2019, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
You sound just like me (being an Upper Midwesterner). Now when I stopped in Lethbridge I was appalled at the way a local pronounced Calgary. In Calgary they pronounced it the same way I do .

Someone from California would probably stick out more here than someone from the Toronto region.
From my experience in the upper Midwest I believe many Americans could not tell the difference between a resident of Michigan or Minnesota from a resident of Ontario or Saskatchewan. IMO an Upper Midwesterner or a Canadian can tell the difference between them. There are subtle differences between Canadian accents and Upper Midwestern ones dontchaknow......LOL. I agree with you though that the accents are similar and that a Californian or a Texan accent would stick out more where you live than a Canadian would. (An Ontario Canadian)
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:34 AM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,253,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krosser100 View Post
Hear how Fung Brothers (from Seattle) on Youtube and their peers speak. Canadian-born Asians don't speak like that. I'm also not saying all American-Asians (such as myself) speak like Fung Bros, or have a slight wannabe gangsta/ street edge to their speech. But it is nonetheless distinctively American accent.
Yeah, I suppose I head the difference. However, most accents of Asian Canadians I've met don't sound "distinctively" Canadian in the same sense than both the Southern accent and Boston accent are distinctively American ones or the famous Maritime accent being distinctively Canadian. Just looked up Albertan accent on YouTube, watched a video by some channel named Rick C, and I feel like the way he talks, as an example, is closer to how people I know in DFW speak than the way the Fung Brothers speak.

Of course, maybe some people might say there isn't really a "Dallas Accent" or "Fort Worth Accent" in the present day because of the number of migrants who picked up English before moving here. For the word Pecan I know a lot of native Texans who say it one way and many who say it another way.
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Old 03-02-2019, 12:21 PM
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Location: Ontario
7,265 posts, read 4,504,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Yes I can. Aboot. Soary. Agaynst. Eh. Words you’ll hear within five minutes of speaking to a Canadian.

And they tend to be really good people. Seriously, some of the best people I know are Canadian. Always an indicator.

Now, I can’t spot them from a distance if that’s what you mean. Unless they have a big maple leaf shirt or something and even then, could still be an American.
All correct...for the time being.

I notice that younger Canadians ...under say 30....do not, I repeat do not,
pronounce those words like older Canadians still do....

They pronouce them just like most Americans do, so it will be much harder in the future
to distingish between the two.

Almost all Canadians still pronounce “roof” as roof...not “ruff” like in the US,
unfortunately not a word used to often in everyday speech.

As mention before...Canadian’s tend to pronouce words more precisely,
no dropped “t’s”....more of a “hard” ...in words like center,
with some Americans the t is almost silent.

Some Americans will get “lazy” on some words, and not pronouce them properly,
like the word “doesn’t” ...becomes something like “dudn’t”...with an almost silent t.
Again, Canadian speech is more precise, never talk like that.

Canadian’s also rarely say vowels “wrong” ...with the Great Lakes Vowel Cities Shift,
which is becoming regionally stronger, some vowels are now shifted ...
an o sounding almost like an a ....word like box ...sounding like bax...
from Buffalo to Chicago , you can hear this vowel shift, also west to Minneapolis area.
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Old 03-03-2019, 02:47 PM
 
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I usually cant tell the difference. Of the Canadians that I have known and worked with in my life I would have assumed they were American had I not known otherwise.
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Old 03-08-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: The South
5,226 posts, read 3,637,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snakeskinn View Post
By accent alone. If a Canadian from Ontario ( the Toronto area) or Vancouver went to California would they be identified as Canadian strictly by the accent?

In all honesty as a Canadian I don’t know what it is that gives us away. When I hear Americans speak in movies it does not sound that different from my own accent here in Toronto. Yet I hear Americans online saying that Canadians are easy to “pick up”. This is just bizarre. I honestly don’t know anyone who says things like “aboot”, if I did I would of course say so but I really don’t hear anyone talk like that. Most of us Canadians here in Toronto consider our selves to speak like Californians. Are we wrong?
I was on a cruise with a lot of Caniadians and everyone of them had on a tee shirt with the words “I Am Canadian” front and back. It was easy to spot them. I think they were trying to convey a message.

Last edited by Southern man; 03-08-2019 at 11:38 AM..
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