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Old 01-28-2019, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,000 posts, read 16,048,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Restaurant reservations, yes. But that's part of what I mean. People will go to a nice dinner, but there isn't the same late-night style found in other urban cities like NYC, Philly, Chicago, etc. Obviously plenty of people go out and drink and party at night. It's still the anchor of a huge metro area. However, the nightlife options are not equivalent. Dining, absolutely. But it's kinda more dinner and a few glasses of wine and go home, whereas NYC and Philly.........are not lol
I would never make the argument that Boston is leading the pack of major American cities in terms of nightlife. Ever. That being said, the general assumption about Boston tends to be that nightlife is non-existent which is definitely not accurate either. It's far more than dinner and a few glasses of wine and go home. Lots of areas do pretty well until the wee hours of the morning 7 days per week. I live near Davis Square in Somerville. If you walk into Davis at 11pm on a Monday/Tues/Weds. night, the streets are still full of people and most of the bars are open until 1am (2 am weekends) and draw crowds. Plenty of Boston neighborhoods are similar.

Again, that's not going to put Boston on par with New York, Chicago, LA, Miami, Vegas, etc. in terms of consistent nightlife. But it's not as if you're going to have a hard time finding a place to go out any night of the week up here. The one complaint about Boston's nightlife I would make is that it's very bar/pub/tavern heavy. This is not a clubbing city. That's fine with me (not my scene), but Boston is definitely not the type of town to do the whole high end nightclub thing.
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Old 01-28-2019, 01:50 PM
 
6,957 posts, read 14,086,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Again, that's not going to put Boston on par with New York, Chicago, LA, Miami, Vegas, etc. in terms of consistent nightlife. But it's not as if you're going to have a hard time finding a place to go out any night of the week up here. The one complaint about Boston's nightlife I would make is that it's very bar/pub/tavern heavy. This is not a clubbing city. That's fine with me (not my scene), but Boston is definitely not the type of town to do the whole high end nightclub thing.
Oh for sure. I agree with this entirely. But a lot of people assume that with the rowdy sports fans and the size of the Boston region, especially with it being the hub of New England, that it's going to be some 24/7 hotspot. It's amazing place with tons to offer, but it's not a top nightlife city at all. Some people don't realize that before they go there, and are surprised at quiet it can be at night, considering all the factors that would make it seem like a rowdy nightlife city.
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Old 01-28-2019, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,719 posts, read 7,669,607 times
Reputation: 7619
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Restaurant reservations, yes. But that's part of what I mean. People will go to a nice dinner, but there isn't the same late-night style found in other urban cities like NYC, Philly, Chicago, etc. Obviously plenty of people go out and drink and party at night. It's still the anchor of a huge metro area. However, the nightlife options are not equivalent. Dining, absolutely. But it's kinda more dinner and a few glasses of wine and go home, whereas NYC and Philly.........are not lol
Not a whole lot of really great dining in Boston either, but reservations are a pain for sure. But if you've been around a while you can avoid that by just assuming everything is more or less just like the last place you went and just be content with something else. Saves time and money!
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Old 01-28-2019, 03:44 PM
 
1,549 posts, read 2,981,627 times
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San Francisco, definitely. I loved it as a visitor. It seemed like such an exciting real big city full of the latest trends, amazing public transportation, and great restaurants and music. Then I moved there, and it turned out to be a big disappointment.

As a visitor, I mostly saw downtown and a lot of the other parts I saw were accessible by BART and/or Muni Metro. But I was also doing what I wanted to on my own schedule. When I actually lived there and had to be at certain places at certain times, having to rely on public transit drove me mad. In my experience Muni buses were almost never on time and in many cases didn't even show up. (I remember reading a survey showed that they had like 60-70% on time rate, and I'm not sure where the heck they got that from but it wasn't anywhere near 60%.) I nearly got rid of my car before moving there because I heard public transit was great and driving/parking was a hassle...well, they were right about the latter but I still found it to be less of a hassle than relying on public transit.

Also, outside of downtown it didn't feel like a big city at all -- in fact, it felt kind of claustrophobic. Things were dense but by smushing everything together rather than building up. Although I guess some people prefer that, but after about a year I felt like I was running around in circles.

There are a lot of good restaurants and cuisines in SF but my favorite, Korean, was not one of them. I suppose I wasn't being fair expecting it to be as good as LA in this regard, but after hearing about how SF was such a foodie mecca, I naively thought everything would be the best. But it's not like the Korean food there was just one or two notches down, it was a complete world of difference. (I remember the first time I went to Brothers, since everyone recommended that place..and thinking this is what people call good?) I later found out that most of the good ones in the Bay Area are in Santa Clara or Oakland. This brings me to another point -- it's kind of a mess to get out of the city, especially for something as simple as going out to eat. And I found out that leaving SF was (strangely) looked down by people who live there, unless you're going to the airport, somewhere on Oakland accessible by BART, Napa/Sonoma, Lake Tahoe, or Santa Cruz.

Also, there were very few full-service supermarkets (other than Safeway and Whole Foods) and virtually no ethic ones. No Ranch 99/H-Mart/Mi Pueblo/Chavez/Mitsuwa. There's a Nijiya but it's small. Most of the Asian/Latin markets are in the form of little corner stores and they close at like 7:30. Even the Chinese market that everyone raves about, New May Wah in the Richmond District (which is bigger than most in SF, though not quite as big as a full-service supermarket), closes at 7:30. Big cities are supposed to have more of everything and be open later, not less and be closed earlier. For a city that has a reputation for both food and diversity...I found this very, very odd. I love late night grocery shopping (weird, I know) and almost always go to non-generic ones, so this situation just wouldn't do. I would have been willing to accept the excuse that SF isn't a big box store type city...except that in SF, Safeway is literally everywhere.

I'll give SF that it has a great music scene, especially for the small to mid-sized acts which it pretty much as a lock on. Still, I have to get places, buy groceries, and go out to eat more than I go to concerts.

I knew it was dirty, cold, and pretentious, so those were not really surprises to me--that said, they do wear you down after awhile (especially the filth.)

Last edited by Radical347; 01-28-2019 at 04:05 PM..
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Old 01-28-2019, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,533 posts, read 3,683,135 times
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I wanted to live in Houston in the early 80's. I was impressed with the growth and the skyline, and agreed with the lack of zoning. Of course, I was much younger then. Today, I would never live there. I visited again in 2015, and left with a "no thankyou". My impression was it was just a giant downtown surrounded by endless suburbs and no rhyme or reason for how the city has developed. My 24 year old vision then has completely turned around, and today have a totally different view. Not to diss Houston...it is a great city...just not for me today.
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Old 01-28-2019, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
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I was never let down by a city, I never go somewhere with expectations of what it should be so maybe that helps.
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Old 01-28-2019, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,885 posts, read 2,734,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 908Boi View Post
And also Orlando. Outside of Disney, truly mind numbing place.
To be fair to Orlando it does have some very nice urban neighborhoods near downtown but they are minuscule in comparison to the horrific sprawl the emanates in every direction.
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Old 01-29-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,849 posts, read 2,975,563 times
Reputation: 3394
Houston was my dream city as a child.
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Old 01-29-2019, 09:08 AM
 
5,452 posts, read 2,292,432 times
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San Francisco. Over time, the experience of visiting there has deteriorated. Used to be fun. Now it's hard to walk around without dealing with aggressive panhandlers. On my last visit for a conference, I had a two block walk between my hotel and a restaurant. Walking there and back, I was hit up by six separate people. And not nicely either.


Portland, Oregon, was a huge disappointment for us. It's kind of dirty and seems maybe a bit too self-aware for its own good. When the city's unofficial motto is "Keep Portland Weird," you know it's a town that's trying too hard. We vamoosed a day early and headed to the Oregon Coast. Good decision on our part.
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Old 01-29-2019, 03:12 PM
 
1,229 posts, read 1,301,025 times
Reputation: 1077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
I like parts of Minneapolis, but was extremely disappointed in downtown. Pretty dead every time I've been there, and the most people you see are at the bus stops. Then, you feel like you need to cross the street, as it's somewhat uncomfortable. I had several occasions where people pretty much stepped in front of me, when I was walking by.
Haha. With 150,000 workers, ~45,000 residents, numerous amenities, including stadiums, concert venues, clubs, bars theaters, restaurants, grocery stores, retail, etc... it's hardly dead. It's not a 24-hour downtown but the vast majority of US downtown areas are not.
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