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Old 11-14-2018, 11:31 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 602,593 times
Reputation: 1872

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtinmemphis View Post
Atlanta Georgia

It seemed to be such a prosperous city back in the 80s and 90s.
Something happened after that. Today the city seems tacky and way too suburban. It seems southern to me.



Memphis Tennessee

Memphis was so much fun visiting growing up. Liberty Land, fairgrounds and Mall of Memphis where awesome. Can't stand the place today.
Someone in Las Vegas calling Atlanta tacky and suburban, that’s rich...and Georgia is still a southern state, despite all of Atlanta’s attempts to welcome people from outside the region, so it being “southern” should come as no surprise.
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Old 11-14-2018, 11:41 AM
 
2,512 posts, read 2,272,883 times
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Orlando - I thought I'd have so much fun visiting as an adult but it's just a terrible fit for my personal taste. Outside of the theme parks, the city itself is so bland.
Salt Lake City - Topography is what I going off of but then we got there and found the city to feel desolate and empty.
Phoenix - Topography again. I think the downtown area is probably my least favorite for a large city.
Saint Louis - Went for history. The city felt like it's behind the times and there were so many run down areas.

There are others I'm not fond of but I was never impressed with them initially.
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Old 11-14-2018, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,006 posts, read 16,065,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
I would say Boston's grit and crime, at the very least, is on par with Paris, London, and NYC at this point. I'm sure stats would back that up.

I do understand what you're saying though. Boston is almost too polished. I do miss the idea of the old grit.. The old Boston Garden, Charlestown in the 70s, the old Southie. It was very real, yet very theatrical. It had an undeniably thick, authentic look and feel. Growing up in Chicago, I always had this idea of the Boston Garden- People hacking down cigarettes, swearing at eachother, noise pollution going in all directions. Now, for every one "old school" Bostonian, you have three pink hat fans with Patagonia and a bit too much gel in their hair.
I agree with you on all fronts here. I think it's just typical of most older American cities with industrial roots. Boston's just a bit a head of the curve in terms of the gentrification process. Up there with NYC and DC. slightly ahead of Philly and Chicago. Give it 10 years in both of those cities.

San Francisco is a real outlier to me. It hit that hyper-elite city status well before all of the cities being discussed here (aside form NYC), but it's definitely retained a good deal of grit. The fact that the Tenderloin is still, well, the Tenderloin, is bizarre. The fact that some of the most common observations of San Francisco is how many homeless people there are, how dirty it is, and how it "smells like pee" makes me feel OK about where Boston is now. Full disclosure - I love San Francisco and would live there.

I also think that Boston's compact layout with the wealthy, older neighborhoods like Beacon Hill, the South End, and Back Bay all surrounding the CBDs contributes toward the overly polished image. In other cities, you'll walk from downtown to an old industrial district pretty seamlessly. Not in Boston (well, unless you count Ft. Point). Here you walk to the Common and off into Beacon Hill, or into the quiet streets of the South End or Back Bay. Most people don't wander beyond that, so it's easy to see how the "polished" image takes hold. But even downtown you have grit. Spend more time in Chinatown, the Theatre District, Downtown Crossing, etc. Move beyond downtown into Methadone Mile, Roxbury, Dorchester, Mattapan, etc. and you'll see grit. Central Square is still gritty. East Somerville is still gritty. Eastie is still very gritty. Chelsea and Everett have been gentrifying for some time, but there's a long way to go. It's definitely a city that's gentrifying at alarming rates, but it's not there yet, and there's plenty of grit to be found.
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Old 11-14-2018, 02:09 PM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
Someone in Las Vegas calling Atlanta tacky and suburban, that’s rich...and Georgia is still a southern state, despite all of Atlanta’s attempts to welcome people from outside the region, so it being “southern” should come as no surprise.
Yeah it's weird. I know Atlanta was one of the first large cities he became familiar with before visiting more traditionally urban cities, but geesh...
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Old 11-14-2018, 03:03 PM
 
5,612 posts, read 6,093,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Yeah it's weird. I know Atlanta was one of the first large cities he became familiar with before visiting more traditionally urban cities, but geesh...
Hi Mutiny,
Hi biscuit head,

Yes it is. Atlanta was one of the first large cities outside of Chicago that I visited. Chicago was dirty, nasty and cold back then. In the 80s and 90s, Atlanta was cool. It was suburban but suburban was good and urban was bad. Also Blacks where doing big things in Atlanta especially in the construction business that I didn't see in the rust belt. When we visited cousins in Cascade Heights, I was very impressed with what I saw.

I use to see the south as being friendly, more prosperous and sophisticated than the midwest. This was due to my limited experience. When I moved south I quickly learned different. It was all an act.

I am currently on a work assignment in Vegas. It isn't half bad. You don't see the conservatism or the fake prosperous and religious bs that you experience in the south. I am looking forward to my next move though. Not a permanent place for me.

Now in 2018 I see Atlanta as a place with a lot to offer. Beautiful skyline especially rolling into the city from Birmingham. When I get off the freeway the streets are not appealing at all. Especially south of DT. I've made comparisons before to Hattiesburg Mississippi. Too spread out.

I just dont like the culture of Atlanta now. You may but I don't. I would take Minneapolis, Chicago, St. Louis, Cleveland, Boston, DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and many other cities over anything in the south outside of Miami and Ft. Lauderdale.

I hope this helps to understand why I don't feel the same way about Atlanta now as I once did.
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Old 11-14-2018, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
311 posts, read 742,353 times
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Princeton, NJ - I visited there several times for my job. First impression: Cool, a college town with an elite university, within train distance of NYC. Seemed like a nice place.

Then I was relocated there. I discovered that the town and the uni were like a divorced couple not on speaking terms. Each stuck to its own sphere, and the town, while still pretty and civilized-looking, was dull as dirt and expensive to boot. The things you expect from college towns, like used bookstores, funky shops, good cheap eats, and an overall atmosphere of arty fun, were notably absent.

Washington, DC - This dates back to the early 90s, so my impressions are probably out of date. I hear things have improved since then. But here goes.

First impression: dignified, attractive city with monuments and museums. Just what a national capital is supposed to look like.

Later impression, after spending a couple of months there: a cultural wasteland, full of politicians and their attendant hangers-on. An occasional good bookstore, but the restaurants and entertainment venues seemed very ordinary. Not what you would expect for the capital of such a large and rich country. Also, around this time it had one of the worst murder rates in the whole country; areas in walking distance of the White House and Capitol Hill were plagued with gang violence. Granted, some of the surrounding suburbs were nice. But on the whole I did not find it an attractive place to live at the time.
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Old 11-14-2018, 04:13 PM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josef K. View Post
Washington, DC - This dates back to the early 90s, so my impressions are probably out of date. I hear things have improved since then. But here goes.

First impression: dignified, attractive city with monuments and museums. Just what a national capital is supposed to look like.

Later impression, after spending a couple of months there: a cultural wasteland, full of politicians and their attendant hangers-on. An occasional good bookstore, but the restaurants and entertainment venues seemed very ordinary. Not what you would expect for the capital of such a large and rich country. Also, around this time it had one of the worst murder rates in the whole country; areas in walking distance of the White House and Capitol Hill were plagued with gang violence. Granted, some of the surrounding suburbs were nice. But on the whole I did not find it an attractive place to live at the time.
You are definitely overdue another visit to DC.
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Old 11-14-2018, 04:25 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,943 posts, read 7,598,673 times
Reputation: 9263
^^^
Yep!
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Old 11-15-2018, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,006 posts, read 16,065,047 times
Reputation: 9360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You are definitely overdue another visit to DC.
Yep! As a former DC resident and still frequent visitor, I would very much disagree with that sentiment. It's a cultural hub, not wasteland. It has an amazing restaurant scene, a lot more people living in the city center in addition to just visiting or working which makes it more far more vibrant, etc. Visit again.
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Old 11-15-2018, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
311 posts, read 742,353 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You are definitely overdue another visit to DC.
I did go back briefly, in 2012. Didn't have much time to look around, but it seemed a lot livelier than the rather dull, one-horse political town that I remembered.
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