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View Poll Results: Which offers a better quality of life?
The US 102 45.74%
Canada 100 44.84%
It's a tie 21 9.42%
Voters: 223. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-21-2019, 06:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Without a doubt USA

if Canada's climates were better they could give us a run for our money
I CAN tell you that Canada's mildest metropolis makes Boston feel like an arctic wasteland in the winter.
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Old 02-21-2019, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abcxyz423 View Post
OH, I don't know about that! It depends where in Canada you are speaking of. The mildest suburbs of Greater Victoria, Canada historically (normally) enjoy warmer winters than some of the suburbs of the Dallas-Ft. Worth (Texas) Metroplex (the most populated urban area in the Deep South!). It seems as though some winter climates in Canada are mild beyond your wildest imagination.

Data Source: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (US Government)
I wish you'd provide an actual link for that information because I can't find it on the NOAA site. Thanks.

I did find this though, which shows that Victoria's historical monthly averages are not as mild as the historic monthly averages of Dallas - which is not surprising to me.

https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...th-average.php
https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...th-average.php
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Old 02-21-2019, 06:43 AM
 
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Default Discrimination

Quote:
Originally Posted by krosser100 View Post
I do agree that minorities in the US may face more social hostility in some ways but yet have a greater chance to break glass ceiling than Canada (or other Anglophone countries for that matter).

I think minorities in the US are also just more vocal (and have more history) about making their mark, so even though Latino, African-American and also Asians often face questionable treatment in the US, they also are able to achieve many things- have many solid role models, etc..-more than would be the case as a minority in the other Anglophone countries.

Personal story, I am Asian-American, I have relatives in Canada and a few of them (born there) mention systemic discrimination, for instance- they have trouble becoming police officers up there, for whatever reason- hiring practices. In San Francisco, there is no shortage of Asian-American police officers of various levels.

The US has just more "extremes" in every angle of the meaning, and I do think as a country, the US still is "land of opportunity" in that regard.
You're absolutely, positively correct. The systemic discrimination is worse in Canada than it is in the USA. There's no doubt about that!
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Old 02-21-2019, 08:31 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 4,069,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abcxyz423 View Post
I CAN tell you that Canada's mildest metropolis makes Boston feel like an arctic wasteland in the winter.
What's the point of comparing Victoria to Boston? Those are two random cities on opposite sides of the continent. What about everything else?

If all of the US was Boston and all of Canada was Victoria, then we could talk.

By the way, do Canadian snowbirds go to Victoria for the winter?
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:10 AM
 
72 posts, read 34,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I wish you'd provide an actual link for that information because I can't find it on the NOAA site. Thanks.

I did find this though, which shows that Victoria's historical monthly averages are not as mild as the historic monthly averages of Dallas - which is not surprising to me.

https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...th-average.php
https://www.currentresults.com/Weath...th-average.php
Thanks for engaging. This is fun for me! Describing the links below, Alvord, Texas is one of many suburbs officially part of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex (no doubt I could have used many other examples). For reference - meteorologists define a winter season as (December 1 - February 28). When you average all 3 months (day AND night!), you will see that ALVORD, TEXAS winters are historically a fraction of a degree warmer than the CITY of Victoria, Canada itself.

However, Victoria's mild suburb - just a few miles to the east (Discovery Island) is a fraction-of-a-degree warmer than Alvord, Texas. Hence, by definition, the winters in Discovery Island, Canada - a suburb of the Greater Victoria(Canada) region - are historically warmer than the winters in Alvord, Texas (an official suburb of the DFW Metroplex). If you dig a little deeper, you'll see the source of those links are NOAA.

ALVORD, TEXAS

https://www.google.com/search?safe=a...30.tsLpUO2uB8U

VICTORIA, CANADA

https://www.google.com/search?safe=a...39.4D85lqpS4N0

DISCOVERY ISLAND, CANADA

https://www.google.com/search?safe=a...39.DUbv0wHElAM
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:16 AM
 
72 posts, read 34,695 times
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Default Weather

Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
What's the point of comparing Victoria to Boston? Those are two random cities on opposite sides of the continent. What about everything else?

If all of the US was Boston and all of Canada was Victoria, then we could talk.

By the way, do Canadian snowbirds go to Victoria for the winter?
Thanks for engaging and...point conceded! The vast majority of Canadians feel colder than Boston in the winter - many Canadians MUCH colder than Boston.

And to answer your question...YES, DEFINITELY. Canadian snowbirds go to Victoria to golf in the winter. But most significantly, it is Canada's premier retirement community. Surprisingly enough, many AMERICANS retire in Victoria, too!
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:34 AM
 
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Trump = fat, old & orange
Trudeau = hot, young & not orange
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:37 AM
 
2,001 posts, read 1,015,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abcxyz423 View Post
Thanks for engaging and...point conceded! The vast majority of Canadians feel colder than Boston in the winter - many Canadians MUCH colder than Boston.

And to answer your question...YES, DEFINITELY. Canadian snowbirds go to Victoria to golf in the winter. But most significantly, it is Canada's premier retirement community. Surprisingly enough, many AMERICANS retire in Victoria, too!
Americans can't live there year around, unless they establish permanent residency. It's not just one day you decide to retire in Canada....it's, definitely, not that easy. And, to answer the question of the thread, I don't believe that Canada has a better quality of life. Health care alone, would be a reason for not moving there. I've mentioned this in previous posts, but I know a couple of MDs who practice in the US, because the Canadian health care system is just not feasible for everyone. They've moved here (permanently), and would never consider practicing in Canada. These are MDs who were born and raised in Canada. Way too many issues, according to them.
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:38 AM
 
72 posts, read 34,695 times
Reputation: 41
Default Boston

Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
What's the point of comparing Victoria to Boston? Those are two random cities on opposite sides of the continent. What about everything else?

If all of the US was Boston and all of Canada was Victoria, then we could talk.

By the way, do Canadian snowbirds go to Victoria for the winter?
By-the-way...I originally made the Boston comparison because I THINK the guy I replied to is from Boston (but I can't be 100% on that one). So there was some rationale to the whole comparison. Being from Boston would provide him with a gauge, so it wasn't that random a comparison.
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:46 AM
 
72 posts, read 34,695 times
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Default Retirement

Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Americans can't live there year around, unless they establish permanent residency. It's not just one day you decide to retire in Canada....it's, definitely, not that easy. And, to answer the question of the thread, I don't believe that Canada has a better quality of life. Health care alone, would be a reason for not moving there. I've mentioned this in previous posts, but I know a couple of MDs who practice in the US, because the Canadian health care system is just not feasible for everyone. They've moved here (permanently), and would never consider practicing in Canada. These are MDs who were born and raised in Canada. Way too many issues, according to them.
I am fully aware Americans can't just decide to up-and-retire in Canada. I understand all the permanent residency issues, and such. I was merely stating a fact that many of the people that are in the retirement communities of the Greater Victoria area are, in fact, American. Their exact path to retirement is an altogether different issue (who knows the story behind it?). Maybe many of them worked in Canada for sometime before retiring in Victoria. I don't know?

Insofar as the doctors are concerned, yes! They have been moving to the USA for decades. It's no surprise since with privatized medicine, doctors in the USA have traditionally been the highest paid in the world. However, I suspect the move from Canada to the USA is becoming more tame over the years as the USA has gradually moved towards slightly more of a managed healthcare model than has traditionally been the case (still very much privatized compared to the rest of the world, of course).
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