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View Poll Results: Which offers a better quality of life?
The US 102 45.74%
Canada 100 44.84%
It's a tie 21 9.42%
Voters: 223. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-08-2018, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
It also explains why millions of Americans choose to live in states where the weather is the same as where most people live in Canada.
The highest concentration of uber-rich people in the U.S. (and in the world in fact) is in New York City, which is a (fairly) cold-winter city in the northern tier of the country.


Presumably these multi-billionaires can choose to live wherever they want in the world.


Also a significant proportion of America's non-billionaire movers, shakers and celebrities choose to live in the NYC area as well. (In terms of home base, this class of people tends to be divided between the NYC area and Mediterranean SoCal.)
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Old 11-08-2018, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Oh, come now. Weather has nothing to do with the majority of Canadians living as far south as possible?

Better farmland may have been a major incentive at one time, but not so much today. With modern technology, it doesn't take millions of Canadian farmers to produce food. Why is everyone still clustered near the border; why haven't more people moved farther north? Could it be, I don't know, that the farther north you go the colder and more inclement the weather gets?
.

Actually, the population line has moved a bit farther north in Canada since the era when agriculture dominated. Following the development of other economic activities, non-agricultural areas with colder climates like northern Ontario (Sudbury, Timmins) or northern Alberta (Fort McMurray) got settled.


These areas are starting to get close to the borderline of the tolerance levels I was talking about, but are still within them IMO, with real summers (even if a bit short) averaging highs around 24C or 75F, but of course winter highs are around 15F or -10C.


But summers in Fort McMurray or Sudbury are still arguably nicer than in most of the UK, for example.
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Old 11-08-2018, 08:05 AM
 
6,497 posts, read 4,076,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The highest concentration of uber-rich people in the U.S. (and in the world in fact) is in New York City, which is a (fairly) cold-winter city in the northern tier of the country.


Presumably these multi-billionaires can choose to live wherever they want in the world.


Also a significant proportion of America's non-billionaire movers, shakers and celebrities choose to live in the NYC area as well. (In terms of home base, this class of people tends to be divided between the NYC area and Mediterranean SoCal.)
Big cities are, I think, always an exception. People will put up with a great deal in order to take advantage of their opportunities and amenities, particularly if it is a top world city like New York City or London.

However, travel inland and north from New York City and the population drops off remarkably. Upstate New York is sparsely populated, as are Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. In fact, the combined population of those last three states is less than that of Toronto. And they are known to be very cold.
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Old 11-08-2018, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,946 posts, read 27,343,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Big cities are, I think, always an exception. People will put up with a great deal in order to take advantage of their opportunities and amenities, particularly if it is a top world city like New York City or London.

However, travel inland and north from New York City and the population drops off remarkably. Upstate New York is sparsely populated, as are Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. In fact, the combined population of those last three states is less than that of Toronto. And they are known to be very cold.
New York State outside of the Greater NYC area has about the same population as New Jersey, Michigan and Virginia. It would be almost knocking on the door of the top 10 most populated states out of 50 if it were its own state.
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Old 11-08-2018, 08:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
New York State outside of the Greater NYC area has about the same population as New Jersey, Michigan and Virginia. It would be almost knocking on the door of the top 10 most populated states out of 50 if it were its own state.
Yes, there are a few other population clusters mainly near the Great Lakes, an area which has attracted economic development on both sides of the border for obvious reasons.
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Old 11-08-2018, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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The economy drives population growth a lot more than the weather does. That's why the fastest-growing counties in the U.S. these days are in the Bakken oilfields region of the northern Great Plains.


Of course, in some places like Florida the weather has been a driver for economic growth, but warm(er) weather doesn't always drive economic growth as evidenced by much of the U.S. South.


In the case of Bakken of course, it's cold in winter but still well within the climactic tolerance range I've alluded to above.


In regions with economic potential but that are too far outside the climactic tolerance range and therefore would not normally favour more permanent settlement and the establishment of full-fledged communities, you often have the fly-in/fly-out worker movements these days. This is common in far northern region of Canada, in parts of Alaska and even in certain areas of Australia that are actually deemed too hot for permanent communities to take root.
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Old 11-08-2018, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Be Proud View Post
??
This is simply not true.For over 40 years at least,the South and West Coast have been the fastest growing regions.The South is now the most populated region in the US
I said millions choose to live in northern states. Are you saying this isn't true?
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Old 11-08-2018, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Oh, come now. Weather has nothing to do with the majority of Canadians living as far south as possible?

Better farmland may have been a major incentive at one time, but not so much today. With modern technology, it doesn't take millions of Canadian farmers to produce food. Why is everyone still clustered near the border; why haven't more people moved farther north? Could it be, I don't know, that the farther north you go the colder and more inclement the weather gets?

People have different ideas about ideal weather, sure. Having options to suit as many people as possible surely adds to a country's QOL. If you're in the US, you have lots of options. In Canada? If you want or need warmer winters, you can leave your country, which is surely not as optimal as being able to stay IN your country, or, oh yeah, you can crowd into "mild" Vancouver.

"Canadians really like their climate!" sounds to Americans like "Americans really like their health care!" does to Canadians. Sure, you can find people on either side who do.
People migrated to Canada east to west like in the US. This started before there was even BEFORE there was a border. The migration patterns followed where the best farmlands were and best hunting etc.

Why are they still there? Do you honestly think people in Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver are going to abandon their cities and just move north? Are people abanonding NYC? Are they leaving Minneapolis?

https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-...lation-growth/

Humans live in all kinds of climates. Climate does dictate where that is, but it doesn't dictate QOL overall.

Last edited by Natnasci; 11-08-2018 at 10:29 AM..
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Old 11-08-2018, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,628 posts, read 4,222,778 times
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Really too vague a question but IMO, climate plays a huge part in where would have a better qualify of life. I just couldn't stand the COLD for 6 months a year in Canada where some likely couldn't stand the heat for 6 months a year down in the South where i live..
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Old 11-08-2018, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,056 posts, read 54,552,165 times
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I hop back and forth between both. Better pizza in NJ, better chips (french fries) in ON.
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