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Old 10-31-2018, 08:04 PM
 
4,504 posts, read 2,691,410 times
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Most of what ilovelondon said would be a good start.

No city in the US is even remotely a candidate for "gold standard."
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Texas
43,600 posts, read 52,784,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovelondon View Post
The gold standard of cities should have the following qualities below. Anything less will not impress.

(1) It should be human-scaled and built for people, rather than for cars. Less wide streets and highways, and more narrower streets and quaint alleyways. For roads that require cars to pass through, "shared streets" where people and cars intermingle can be explored. Or for those where cars are a priority, pedestrian islands to help people "jaywalk" safely.

(2) There must be great public spaces that is safe and accessible to all.

(3) Safe with low levels of crime, especially violent crime.

(4) Beautiful parks and woodlands with wildlife.

(5) Neighborhoods outside the city center (such as those in the suburbs) should be self-contained with vibrant main streets that are within a 5-minute walk for most of its residents.

(6) Diversity of neighborhoods in atmosphere and personality where each corner of the city looks and feels different from one another. From posh to scruffy but trendy. From industrial-chic to small-town chic. From the Old world to the Modern world. It must NOT feel homogenous.

(7) It has beautiful architecture that lifts the spirit

(8) It has amazing nightlife with a vibrant street life throughout the day.

(9) Extensive public transport network where terminal train stations become destinations themselves (just like Grand Central station in New York and Union Station in Toronto after a lengthy redevelopment).


New York City probably comes the closest in satisfying these requirements, and therefore, should be the gold standard for cities in the US.
Gag.
Overcrowded is not my idea of awesome standard.
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:49 PM
 
3,245 posts, read 1,572,187 times
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Most Americans

- DO NOT want super-density.
- clearly want homes with some privacy and not all narrow-connected row-homes or tenement-style full blocks.
- green-frontage yes and trees, a yard even small one is preferred.
- most still will have vehicles and don't want extra-narrow streets and fighting for a parking spot and parallel-parking each other in at times as a norm.

Most Americans are fine with main streets filled with businesses. But still want the neighborhood blocks between them to be more quite to go home to.

Tight streets lined with parked vehicles and all connected homes might be considered highly walkable. But looses points if cars are everywhere and homes have narrow sidewalks that might have obstacles even. Not much left then for a pleasant walk. Especially if green is limited too.

As long as Americans want .... or need their vehicles and bigger ones then most of the worlds common ones. A more moderate to a medium density over extra-high NYC super-densities of Manhattan. Car friendly it certainly is not.

Many cities clearly could have done better planning their city better. Our fast-growing cities today especially. Transit for sure and much more then most have ..... and being one of our biggest failures. We had it thru ww2 then it gradually then quickly we lost sight of it and long commuting times are part of the cost of it on expressways and such.

Our best cities that do it better are more silver-standard with areas of gold generally most costly too. Far too many not even silver.
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,829 posts, read 3,327,962 times
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I think multiple cities have multiple gold standards.

It’s hard to say which would be the standard though. I’ve never heard of anything being something for everyone.
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Old 10-31-2018, 09:25 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 1,130,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Well-run? In what way?
Parks. Public spaces. Decent transportation for a city itís size. Civic events.
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Old 10-31-2018, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,045 posts, read 102,757,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Parks. Public spaces. Decent transportation for a city itís size. Civic events.
This may come as some surprise to you, but most cities have those attributes.
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Old 10-31-2018, 09:30 PM
 
1,292 posts, read 1,130,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
This may come as some surprise to you, but most cities have those attributes.
I mean your condescending tone aside, no, it doesnít. I travel quite extensively actually.
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Old 10-31-2018, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Metrowest Boston
146 posts, read 120,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
Do you feel that Boston should be the golden standard for America?
100%. If the country was as well run as Massachusetts, we'd all be a hell of a lot better off. If the cities were more like Boston, we'd all be much better off. It's not perfect, but it's just about as good as it gets in the US. I say this as a *very* well traveled person domestically, and globally.

#flamesuiton
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Old 10-31-2018, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,575 posts, read 731,336 times
Reputation: 2028
I think Chicago does a good job providing abundant cultural offerings and job opportunities of all types in a setting that's easy to navigate with or without a vehicle, all without breaking the bank. Objectively, it's a good place for a single person or a couple without kids to set up camp. The lower rents that come from being unafraid to build huge numbers of units should definitely be looked at by other cities.

But as long as half of the city is a borderline war zone and the government insists on wasting taxpayer dollars on eye candy that doesn't improve people's lives, I can't plaster too many positive adjectives on my hometown.
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Old 10-31-2018, 11:32 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,788 posts, read 2,575,963 times
Reputation: 3023
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Parks. Public spaces. Decent transportation for a city itís size. Civic events.
Parks are a super must with tons of them that allow one to get away from the hustle and bustle without leaving the city.
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