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Old 12-03-2018, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,081 posts, read 36,303,462 times
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All booms burst. Especially in oil and gas. Anyone in the industry would know that and be prepared for it.

Midland - get ready! LOL
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Old 12-11-2018, 03:57 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,178,263 times
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I keep coming back to this, but why is population growth celebrated in such an odd manner here? There's good, sustainable growth, which means the local economy must'n be half bad, but growth for growth's sake is silly.
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:13 AM
 
Location: New York City
5,738 posts, read 5,127,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
I keep coming back to this, but why is population growth celebrated in such an odd manner here? There's good, sustainable growth, which means the local economy must'n be half bad, but growth for growth's sake is silly.
Its a p**sing contest. Same thing for most populated cities. I remember when Phoenix passed Philadelphia for number 5, it was some kind of prize for Phoenix, when in reality Phoenix is a sprawling suburb with 5 times the land area of Philadelphia, and Philadelphia is easily a better city in every aspect.

I think growth whether large or small is a product of a healthy metro/ region/ state. The sunbelt cities are going through their growth spurt just like the Northeastern cities did during their growing time.

I think a major issue with the heavy growth in sunbelt cities like Dallas, Charlotte, Orlando, etc. is that it leads to poor urban planning, massive unappealing sprawl, adding little to no character to the respective regions.

The slower growing metros like Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago are very developed and aesthetically appealing from stricter zoning/ planning ordinances and feature actual towns / villages that aren't mass developed.

The result of most new development doesn't differentiate Charlotte from Dallas or Dallas from Orlando. Whereas, traveling through the Philadelphia or Chicago or Boston region you will know you are not in a sprawling area. My hope is that sunbelt cities begin to use infill tactics and take it easy on the 1000 home subdivisions.

If you make it through my longwinded answer, there are positives and negatives to fast growth.
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Old 12-14-2018, 05:37 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,178,263 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Its a p**sing contest. Same thing for most populated cities. I remember when Phoenix passed Philadelphia for number 5, it was some kind of prize for Phoenix, when in reality Phoenix is a sprawling suburb with 5 times the land area of Philadelphia, and Philadelphia is easily a better city in every aspect.

I think growth whether large or small is a product of a healthy metro/ region/ state. The sunbelt cities are going through their growth spurt just like the Northeastern cities did during their growing time.

I think a major issue with the heavy growth in sunbelt cities like Dallas, Charlotte, Orlando, etc. is that it leads to poor urban planning, massive unappealing sprawl, adding little to no character to the respective regions.

The slower growing metros like Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago are very developed and aesthetically appealing from stricter zoning/ planning ordinances and feature actual towns / villages that aren't mass developed.

The result of most new development doesn't differentiate Charlotte from Dallas or Dallas from Orlando. Whereas, traveling through the Philadelphia or Chicago or Boston region you will know you are not in a sprawling area. My hope is that sunbelt cities begin to use infill tactics and take it easy on the 1000 home subdivisions.

If you make it through my longwinded answer, there are positives and negatives to fast growth.
You're right. One must consider land area. Take my metro for example.
Minneapolis is a city of 415,000 people. Not extremely huge. Maybe in the top 50 most populated cities in the US. Then, there is St. Paul, 310,000 people.

They are the Twin Cities.. Yet, most people don't realize is that they share borders. They are adjacent to each other. With Minneapolis at 55 square miles of land, and St. Paul at 52 square miles, combined they make up 107 square miles and 725,000 people. If made into one incorporated city, Minneapolis-St. Paul would fall only behind San Francisco in population (885,000) and sq. miles (46.9).

That equates to a population density of 6,775 per square mile, behind big guys of NYC, LA, CHI, Philly, San Francisco, Boston, Seattle, DC and Baltimore.
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Old 12-14-2018, 05:39 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,178,263 times
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Phoenix makes up 517 square miles! That's absurd! nearly 10x the land size as Minneapolis. Another indicator that pop density is a true measure.
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Old 12-14-2018, 05:42 PM
 
3,588 posts, read 1,402,497 times
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US House Apportionment matters.
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Old 12-14-2018, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,075,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Phoenix makes up 517 square miles! That's absurd! nearly 10x the land size as Minneapolis. Another indicator that pop density is a true measure.
Jacksonville makes it 747 sq miles
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Old 12-14-2018, 10:53 PM
 
6,984 posts, read 14,115,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
I keep coming back to this, but why is population growth celebrated in such an odd manner here? There's good, sustainable growth, which means the local economy must'n be half bad, but growth for growth's sake is silly.
Because insecure Sunbelt cities like to flaunt their population growth to "prove" their "superiority" over northern/western cities. Just look at Austin and Nashville. They have experienced massive population growth, but their COL is skyrocketing, traffic is far worse than it should be for their size because urban planning is severely lacking, and they're losing their cultures in a way. Also, many people moving South don't realize that the lower COL often comes with lower salaries and/or lower quality of life/services. I'd much rather take healthy, smart growth like Minneapolis. The city is prospering, but is able to keep up with taking care of its citizens and expanding its public transit.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:02 PM
 
1,646 posts, read 1,569,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Phoenix makes up 517 square miles! That's absurd! nearly 10x the land size as Minneapolis. Another indicator that pop density is a true measure.
Yet the Phoenix urban area is much denser than the Minneapolis urban area.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:05 PM
 
1,646 posts, read 1,569,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Because insecure Sunbelt cities like to flaunt their population growth to "prove" their "superiority" over northern/western cities. Just look at Austin and Nashville. They have experienced massive population growth, but their COL is skyrocketing, traffic is far worse than it should be for their size because urban planning is severely lacking, and they're losing their cultures in a way. Also, many people moving South don't realize that the lower COL often comes with lower salaries and/or lower quality of life/services. I'd much rather take healthy, smart growth like Minneapolis. The city is prospering, but is able to keep up with taking care of its citizens and expanding its public transit.
Sounds like you should run for mayor of Minneapolis. Very innovative perspective.
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