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Old 12-15-2018, 03:11 AM
 
1,829 posts, read 1,251,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Because insecure Sunbelt cities like to flaunt their population growth to "prove" their "superiority" over northern/western cities. Just look at Austin and Nashville. They have experienced massive population growth, but their COL is skyrocketing, traffic is far worse than it should be for their size because urban planning is severely lacking, and they're losing their cultures in a way. Also, many people moving South don't realize that the lower COL often comes with lower salaries and/or lower quality of life/services. I'd much rather take healthy, smart growth like Minneapolis. The city is prospering, but is able to keep up with taking care of its citizens and expanding its public transit.
You livein another world. I'm no fan of Austin boosters, but they are in no way insecure.they 100% truly do think their city ison top of the world.in comparison to both rust belt cities and their peers in Texas.

That said, salaries after adjusting for COL is still high in Austin, and that city, along with Houston and DFW, do just as well as the Midwest and Rust Belt when it comes to income after COL.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,052,094 times
Reputation: 5008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
You livein another world. I'm no fan of Austin boosters, but they are in no way insecure.they 100% truly do think their city ison top of the world.in comparison to both rust belt cities and their peers in Texas.

That said, salaries after adjusting for COL is still high in Austin, and that city, along with Houston and DFW, do just as well as the Midwest and Rust Belt when it comes to income after COL.
There are a lot of variables involved in that. One of the biggest ones is land value and home prices which are skyrocketing, $450k for a house that would go for $200k in most Midwest states. It's becoming very unbalanced and is starting to go the way of Seattle and some California cities
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,643 posts, read 7,446,834 times
Reputation: 4317
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Its a p**sing contest. Same thing for most populated cities. I remember when Phoenix passed Philadelphia for number 5, it was some kind of prize for Phoenix, when in reality Phoenix is a sprawling suburb with 5 times the land area of Philadelphia, and Philadelphia is easily a better city in every aspect.

I think growth whether large or small is a product of a healthy metro/ region/ state. The sunbelt cities are going through their growth spurt just like the Northeastern cities did during their growing time.

I think a major issue with the heavy growth in sunbelt cities like Dallas, Charlotte, Orlando, etc. is that it leads to poor urban planning, massive unappealing sprawl, adding little to no character to the respective regions.

The slower growing metros like Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago are very developed and aesthetically appealing from stricter zoning/ planning ordinances and feature actual towns / villages that aren't mass developed.

The result of most new development doesn't differentiate Charlotte from Dallas or Dallas from Orlando. Whereas, traveling through the Philadelphia or Chicago or Boston region you will know you are not in a sprawling area. My hope is that sunbelt cities begin to use infill tactics and take it easy on the 1000 home subdivisions.

If you make it through my longwinded answer, there are positives and negatives to fast growth.
Great. Another New Yorker who believes he/she knows better than the people of Phoenix how Phoenicians think, believe, and (should) live their lives. Most people in both of these cities couldn't care less about the fabricated pissing contest between which P city has the larger population, but there's always someone in NY who does and feels the need to chime in.
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Old 12-15-2018, 11:26 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,768 posts, read 2,556,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdaelectro View Post
Yet the Phoenix urban area is much denser than the Minneapolis urban area.
Right! Not a good comparison Phoenix however sunbelt it may be is attracting people in droves no matter how much people on CD praise urban living truth is majority of americans do not want urban living this is a fact. Population growth is a sign of desirability no one would move there if they didn't think it was better than the places they are leaving i.e. rust belt. What has made any of these cities desirable is the population growth they had in past centuries.

Last edited by sean1the1; 12-15-2018 at 11:52 AM..
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Old 12-15-2018, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,525 posts, read 706,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
Right! Not a good comparison Phoenix however sunbelt it may be is attracting people in droves no matter how much people on CD praise urban living truth is majority of americans do not want urban living this is a fact. Population growth is a sign of desirability no one would move there if they didn't think it was better than the places they are leaving i.e. rust belt. What has made any of these cities desirable is the population growth they had in past centuries.
You have a point, but I'd say it's more that the majority of new jobs are in states that generally lack dense urban centers (i.e. states with a lot of sprawl) - because the lower population density and less liberal cultural atmospheres cause taxes to be lower, so companies move there. I don't know that most people *prefer* sprawl; they just don't mind it enough to keep them from relocating to sprawly areas for work.

/guy from Chicago who moved to Nevada for work
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Old 12-18-2018, 01:35 PM
 
295 posts, read 106,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
You have a point, but I'd say it's more that the majority of new jobs are in states that generally lack dense urban centers (i.e. states with a lot of sprawl) - because the lower population density and less liberal cultural atmospheres cause taxes to be lower, so companies move there. I don't know that most people *prefer* sprawl; they just don't mind it enough to keep them from relocating to sprawly areas for work.

/guy from Chicago who moved to Nevada for work
I can definitely see this. When I lived in Nashville, it seemed like most people who complained about the traffic were more than ok living an hour away from their jobs. Peoples love for the town and social environment outweighed any hatred of sprawl. I appreciate that different cities exist for different people.

Taxes, weather, and the perceived opportunities (many of which are legitimate) are why people relocate to the south.
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Old 12-18-2018, 01:41 PM
 
2,001 posts, read 1,017,298 times
Reputation: 2667
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
Right! Not a good comparison Phoenix however sunbelt it may be is attracting people in droves no matter how much people on CD praise urban living truth is majority of americans do not want urban living this is a fact. Population growth is a sign of desirability no one would move there if they didn't think it was better than the places they are leaving i.e. rust belt. What has made any of these cities desirable is the population growth they had in past centuries.
I know lots of people relocating to Phoenix for the winter....they're all retired. They all have purchased property...hence contributing to the population growth. BUT, they kept their homes in the Rust Belt for the rest of the year. I love Phoenix, but it's not sustainable, and that will be a big deal in the future.
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Old 12-18-2018, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,631 posts, read 8,322,265 times
Reputation: 7587
Default Population change release for National, States, territories, and federal districts, 2018

Population change release for National, States, territories, and federal districts, 2018

I'm making this thread a few hours early so that way some people can utilize this thread for predictions and/or stating expectations prior to the official release.

The national, states, territories, and federal districts population estimates for 2018 come out within 15 hours from the making of this thread according to the census bureau's release schedule for today December 19, 2018 (tomorrow for the United States):

Calendar: December 2018
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Old 12-18-2018, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,052,687 times
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Estimates are just that, estimates. But they are fun to look at for us nerds. I wonder how close California gets to the 40 million mark.
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Old 12-19-2018, 05:12 AM
 
3,960 posts, read 3,490,733 times
Reputation: 6361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Estimates are just that, estimates. But they are fun to look at for us nerds. I wonder how close California gets to the 40 million mark.
Your wording makes it sound like they take a shot in the dark. They are a bit more scientifically calculated than "just that". They are based of income tax returns and other factors. The last two decades of paying attention to these estimates has shown they are pretty darn accurate when the census is released. I've been watching for news releases on these numbers for a week now and haven't seen any movement on the CB website. Perhaps they have changed how they announce them.
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