U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-19-2018, 10:25 AM
 
11,970 posts, read 5,111,061 times
Reputation: 18709

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
NYS got crushed, surprising because Buffalo’s trend has turned around a bit so I wonder if NYC ground to a halt
That might explain Illinois as well if people are moving out of the mega cities and the states they are in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-19-2018, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,097 posts, read 13,480,618 times
Reputation: 5766
And ranked by population total on July 1, 2018.


1. California: 39,557,045
2. Texas: 28,701,845
3. Florida: 21,299,325
4. New York: 19,542,209
5. Pennsylvania: 12,807,060
6. Illinois: 12,741,080
7. Ohio: 11,689,442
8. Georgia: 10,519,475
9. North Carolina: 10,383,620
10. Michigan: 9,995,915
11. New Jersey: 8,908,520
12. Virginia: 8,517,685
13. Washington: 7,535,591
14. Arizona: 7,171,646
15. Massachusetts: 6,902,149
16. Tennessee: 6,770,010
17. Indiana: 6,691,878
18. Missouri: 6,126,452
19. Maryland: 6,042,718
20. Wisconsin: 5,813,568
21. Colorado: 5,695,564
22. Minnesota: 5,611,179
23. South Carolina: 5,084,127
24. Alabama: 4,887,871
25. Louisiana: 4,659,978
26. Kentucky: 4,468,402
27. Oregon: 4,190,713
28. Oklahoma: 3,943,079
29. Connecticut: 3,572,665
30. Utah: 3,161,105
31. Iowa: 3,156,145
32. Nevada: 3,034,392
33. Arkansas: 3,013,825
34. Mississippi: 2,986,530
35. Kansas: 2,911,505
36. New Mexico: 2,095,428
37. Nebraska: 1,929,268
38. West Virginia: 1,805,832
39. Idaho: 1,754,208
40. Hawaii: 1,420,491
41. New Hampshire: 1,356,458
42. Maine: 1,338,404
43. Montana: 1,062,305
44. Rhode Island: 1,057,315
45. Delaware: 967,171
46. South Dakota: 882,235
47. North Dakota: 760,077
48. Alaska: 737,438
49. Washington DC: 702,455
50. Vermont: 626,299
51. Wyoming: 577,737
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,097 posts, read 13,480,618 times
Reputation: 5766
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
That might explain Illinois as well if people are moving out of the mega cities and the states they are in.

Some states it's likely economic problems (Mississippi, Alaska), while in others like New York, it's probably cost of living. It shows that economy is the main factor in where people live rather than weather or anything else. Northern states with good economies can and do grow while Southern/Western states with crap economies can and do buck the growth of the regions. That is the main deciding factor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,561 posts, read 744,703 times
Reputation: 1668
If the 2018 estimates were used for reapportionment, the following states would gain or lose House seats:

Gains:
Colorado 7 -> 8
Florida 27 -> 29
North Carolina 13 -> 14
Oregon 5 -> 6
Texas 36 -> 38

Losses:
Illinois 18 -> 17
Michigan 14 -> 13
Minnesota 8 -> 7
New York 27 -> 26
Pennsylvania 18 -> 17
Rhode Island 2 -> 1
West Virginia 3 -> 2

This reapportionment outcome would marginally benefit Republicans in the electoral college, as the only solid red state to lose a seat is WV, and the only solid blue state to gain a seat is OR. But it wouldn't make a major difference unless an overall election is very close.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
712 posts, read 397,467 times
Reputation: 1207
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
NYS got crushed, surprising because Buffalo’s trend has turned around a bit so I wonder if NYC ground to a halt
If you look at components of change, net migration actually improved a bit since 2017. However, international migration fell from 130,000 to 70,000. Not good considering immigration numbers were driving upstate growth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 11:07 AM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,534,811 times
Reputation: 5786
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjoseph View Post
If you look at components of change, net migration actually improved a bit since 2017. However, international migration fell from 130,000 to 70,000. Not good considering immigration numbers were driving upstate growth.
Buffalo has also had the best job numbers in Upstate so it’s possible it’s a Rochester/Binghamton/Syracuse which are stable/losing jobs and losing retirees will see stark declines
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 11:32 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,829 posts, read 21,135,718 times
Reputation: 9418
States like NY and CA depend on international migration for population growth. Govt now reducing legal immigration quotas, could explain loss.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,631 posts, read 8,320,280 times
Reputation: 7587
I'm surprised that not a single person yet has reported on the census revisions to the 2017 numbers. The lot of it is extremely shocking. Each year when the census bureau releases their population estimates they also revise the previous year's population estimate either upward or downward if they find evidence that they have been over-counting or under-counting places.

Please pay close attention to the detail in the three lists below. I'll be posting three lists: the first will be the 2017 census estimates that were reported last year; the second will be the 2017 census estimates that were released today as upward and/or downward revisions; and the third will be the 2018 census estimates that came out today.

State population for 2017 (pre-revision/released 1 year ago):
01. California: 39,536,653
02. Texas: 28,304,596
03. Florida: 20,984,400
04. New York: 19,849,399
05. Pennsylvania: 12,805,537
06. Illinois: 12,802,023
07. Ohio: 11,658,609
08. Georgia:10,429,379
09. North Carolina: 10,273,419
10. Michigan: 9,962,311

State population for 2017 (post-revision/released today):
01. California: 39,399,349
02. Texas: 28,322,717
03. Florida: 20,976,812
04. New York: 19,590,719
05. Pennsylvania: 12,790,447
06. Illinois: 12,786,196
07. Ohio: 11,664,129
08. Georgia: 10,413,055
09. North Carolina: 10,270,800
10. Michigan: 9,976,447

State population for 2018 (released today):
01. California: 39,557,045
02. Texas: 28,701,845
03. Florida: 21,299,325
04. New York: 19,542,209
05. Pennsylvania: 12,807,060
06. Illinois: 12,741,080
07. Ohio: 11,689,442
08. Georgia: 10,519,475
09. North Carolina: 10,383,620
10. Michigan: 9,995,915

Take an extra careful look at California and New York on all three lists. California's 2017 numbers were revised downward by -137,000 people. In addition to that, California's + 157,000 from the newly released 2018 numbers is the lowest it has added in a year since the 1940s. The next lowest year for California was 2006 with + 193,259. It does not appear that California will be reaching 40 million by the 2020 census, it is way off course now. The state of New York's 2017 numbers were revised downward by nearly -260,000 people. On a brighter note, Michigan is doing pretty well now.

When the numbers for metropolitan areas come out in March of 2019, there will likely be population decline for the New York MSA, Los Angeles MSA, and Chicago MSA. If they avoid decline, then stagnation of barely any year-over-year growth.

Last edited by Trafalgar Law; 12-19-2018 at 12:15 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles-Houston-DFW
1,681 posts, read 836,988 times
Reputation: 1778
There's been less domestic migration into Texas than I thought. "Only" about 83,000 and the international migration at about 105,000. I was surprised to see Florida have the highest with both domestic/international migration. Seems the only reason why Texas outgrew it is because of natural increase. Basically the retirees skew Florida's death numbers into being so high.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,631 posts, read 8,320,280 times
Reputation: 7587
Quote:
Originally Posted by DabOnEm View Post
When are counties/metros released?

There's been less domestic migration into Texas than I thought. "Only" about 83,000 and the international migration at about 105,000. I was surprised to see Florida have the highest with both domestic/international migration. Seems the only reason why Texas outgrew it is because of natural increase. Basically the retirees skew Florida's death numbers into being so high.
These numbers for both Texas and Florida include all of 2017's devastating hurricanes; Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma, and Hurricane Maria.

Florida accelerated significantly because it absorbed population gains from Puerto Rico due to the devastation of Hurricane Maria and Hurricane Irma. Texas in contrast slowed down from July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018 because of Hurricane Harvey damaging Houston (when metropolitan area numbers come out, I expect Greater Houston to be + 55,000 or + 60,000 instead of its usual + 100,000 or more due to Harvey). In both cases this is a one year thing, meaning next year when the 2019 numbers come out Texas will be back to its regular + 400,000 people or more with Houston back to normal (as its job growth numbers imply) and Florida will be returning back to normal as well. It will not be absorbing growth from Puerto Rico's devastation in 2019, so Florida should be somewhere between the range of + 250,000 to + 300,000 people. Which is the normal range for Florida in an average to good year.

The bigger story to ponder over is why California has slowed to a crawl and why New York is now leading the United States in raw number population decline. From July 1, 2017 (post-revision numbers) to July 1, 2018 the state of New York declined -48,000 people.

Last edited by Trafalgar Law; 12-19-2018 at 11:53 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top