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Old 11-03-2018, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
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Charlottesville, Richmond, and Hampton Roads are all in the same region? Those are three very different places.
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Old 11-03-2018, 07:36 PM
 
619 posts, read 442,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
Charlottesville, Richmond, and Hampton Roads are all in the same region? Those are three very different places.
So are Long Island, Manhattan and the Bronx.
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Old 11-03-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atadytic19 View Post
So are Long Island, Manhattan and the Bronx.

But those are at least reasonably near each other, have similar geography, and the people who live in all three identify to some degree as being in the NY metro area.


Charlottesville and Virginia Beach are several hours apart. There are huge rural spaces between them. One is in the mountains, the other is a beach town. People who live in Charlottesville do not in any way think they live in the same metro area as Hampton Roads, and vice versa. And the same goes for the people of Richmond. You might be able to make an argument that Richmond and Charlottesville could be seen as one metro area, but even that seems like a stretch
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Old 11-03-2018, 09:19 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,061,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
But those are at least reasonably near each other, have similar geography, and the people who live in all three identify to some degree as being in the NY metro area.


Charlottesville and Virginia Beach are several hours apart. There are huge rural spaces between them. One is in the mountains, the other is a beach town. People who live in Charlottesville do not in any way think they live in the same metro area as Hampton Roads, and vice versa. And the same goes for the people of Richmond. You might be able to make an argument that Richmond and Charlottesville could be seen as one metro area, but even that seems like a stretch
Remember, this map is based on commuting patterns. The whole model is driven strictly by where people in a given area commute for their work. Geography, "identity", and proximity are not factored in.
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Old 11-03-2018, 09:20 PM
 
5,302 posts, read 3,333,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
But those are at least reasonably near each other, have similar geography, and the people who live in all three identify to some degree as being in the NY metro area.


Charlottesville and Virginia Beach are several hours apart. There are huge rural spaces between them. One is in the mountains, the other is a beach town. People who live in Charlottesville do not in any way think they live in the same metro area as Hampton Roads, and vice versa. And the same goes for the people of Richmond. You might be able to make an argument that Richmond and Charlottesville could be seen as one metro area, but even that seems like a stretch
If you read the link and how they came up with their megaregions, it's easily explained why Charlottesville and Virginia Beach are grouped together, it's Richmond and people commuting from both extremes (Charlottesville and Hampton Roads) to the capital city:

My colleague Alasdair Rae and I published a paper in the journal PLoS One last fall where we turned to a variable which offers a good proxy for both the spatial patterns of how people live and how areas are economically connected: commuting data. Using a data set from the US Census Bureau, we mapped more than 4 million commuter connections between communities in the United States. We then subjected this data to a community-detection algorithm. That’s a high-powered piece of computer software that groups data points together in a way which keeps highly-related points in the same category and splits weakly-related points into different categories.
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Old 11-03-2018, 09:50 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,786 posts, read 2,567,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chimérique View Post
Silicon Valley is very wealthy and so is the OC, hence their similarity, but the Silicon Valley does blow out all of California for wealth including the OC. Silicon Valley is south of SF, similarly the OC is south of LA.

The IE is east of LA and the far East Bay and Stockton-Modesto are east of SF. When I say the "far East Bay" I'm not really including the Bay side of the East Bay(Oakland/Berk/Hayward-all the way down 880). The far East Bay is on the other side of the Oakland/Berkeley Hills. Wealth levels of the IE match more with Stockton-Modesto than with SJ-Silicon Valley.
I wasn't going off of wealth, but the fact that SJ can stand on it's own as a metro, but OC is dependant on LA, and is essentially LA suburbs.

Silicon Valley is very rich, and what amazes me is how it almost feels like it's own city, and a good size, but when you think about it tiny suburban OC has it beat by a million people literally the 6th most populous county in the country. OC on its own has more people than NOVA, and it's literally a small suburban county of 3.2 million. That's part of the reason why I said East Bay as well it has similar population to OC I think OC even has the entire East Bay beat as well.
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Old 11-03-2018, 10:03 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,610 posts, read 3,687,027 times
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First glance...Des Moines stretches to Indiana?
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Old 11-04-2018, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,663,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Remember, this map is based on commuting patterns. The whole model is driven strictly by where people in a given area commute for their work. Geography, "identity", and proximity are not factored in.

Exactly, and I should have added that to my points above. The idea that people in Norfolk would commute to Richmond or Charlottesville is ridiculous. Which makes me think a lot of the rest of this map is probably ridiculous, too.
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Old 11-04-2018, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,214 posts, read 2,840,021 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
Exactly, and I should have added that to my points above. The idea that people in Norfolk would commute to Richmond or Charlottesville is ridiculous. Which makes me think a lot of the rest of this map is probably ridiculous, too.
I don't know how you wouldn't be aware of this living in Williamsburg, but...

There are in fact people loving on the Peninsula who commute into the capital. So given the purpose of said map, this isn't far fetched. Sure it's hard to imagine why anyone would want to commute from the Southside into Richmond, but given that the Peninsula is considered part of the same metro area as the Southside, it us the link from Richmond to Hampton Roads, Richmond in turn being linked to Charlottesville...

You can get from Charlottesville to Newport News in just two hours. Richmond can get to either city in an hour tops. This is not crazy. If anything you should celebrate how you can geographically take activity in three regions of Virginia within a day...
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Old 11-04-2018, 09:20 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,825,755 times
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This aligns with the joke that Charlotte is the largest city in South Carolina, even though it's in North Carolina.
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