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Old 11-03-2018, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,508 posts, read 700,817 times
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I have noticed, as the OP suggests, that international travel and travel within the US surprisingly aren't that correlated. I've known educated people from the East Coast who have only ever been to other East Coast states (and see no reason to expand their horizons into flyover backwaters like Chicago, Denver, St. Louis, or Minneapolis) but then have also been to several European, Asian, and/or Latin American countries.
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Old 11-03-2018, 07:17 AM
 
29,873 posts, read 27,324,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
Having lived in the western US most of my life (Colorado/Arizona), I've never stepped foot in Georgia, Carolinas, Louisiana, some of the Northeast such as Vermont, New York, Rhode Island, Delaware and North Dakota. I have no interest in those parts of the US, the people or the culture.
That's very telling.
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Old 11-03-2018, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
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I'll tell you what's crazy and at least I know it about myself. I have lived in Texas for 27 years. I have never been to Mexico. For that matter, I've also never been to Canada. However, I've been all over Europe and in fact, have lived in both Germany and Japan - and I've traveled to Europe on vacation since moving from there several times.

Just never have gotten around to visiting the two other countries that border my own! LOL

That being said, I've lived in about 12 states and visited about 35. And for the record, I don't know a single person anywhere who has never been out of the state of Texas. In fact, most of the people I know aren't even native to Texas though they live here now.
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Old 11-03-2018, 08:59 AM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,027 posts, read 1,987,034 times
Reputation: 1719
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
Having lived in the western US most of my life (Colorado/Arizona), I've never stepped foot in Georgia, Carolinas, Louisiana, some of the Northeast such as Vermont, New York, Rhode Island, Delaware and North Dakota. I have no interest in those parts of the US, the people or the culture.
Why?
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Old 11-03-2018, 10:13 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,716,813 times
Reputation: 30786
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
I've known educated people from the East Coast who have only ever been to other East Coast states (and see no reason to expand their horizons into flyover backwaters like Chicago, Denver, St. Louis, or Minneapolis) but then have also been to several European, Asian, and/or Latin American countries.
Believe it or not, it can often be cheaper to fly from NYC to Europe than to many western US cities. I am often finding flights from JFK to Brussels, Bergen, and Munich for about $300-350 dollars, while getting to Albuquerque actually costs about $50-100 more.
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Old 11-03-2018, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,213 posts, read 2,499,142 times
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In my experience, rural inhabitants travel to different regions less than urban residents. I understand this is anecdotal but the people I knew in Montana rarely traveled and if they did it was to Las Vegas, Arizona, or Alaska. When I was in the U.P. people seemed to go to Wisconsin and Florida. While in Toledo people went all over the US. In Milwaukee it seems to be all over the US (for vacation and to visit relatives) and quite often overseas. Almost half my daughter's hockey team will be out of the country for Thanksgiving, including us.
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Old 11-03-2018, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,558 posts, read 743,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
In my experience, rural inhabitants travel to different regions less than urban residents. I understand this is anecdotal but the people I knew in Montana rarely traveled and if they did it was to Las Vegas, Arizona, or Alaska. When I was in the U.P. people seemed to go to Wisconsin and Florida. While in Toledo people went all over the US. In Milwaukee it seems to be all over the US (for vacation and to visit relatives) and quite often overseas. Almost half my daughter's hockey team will be out of the country for Thanksgiving, including us.
I think traveling to distant locations is correlated with educational attainment and income, with the exception of migrants who would tend to visit their place of origin. Metropolitan areas in general have a more educated and affluent population than rural areas (although there are exceptions like Vermont and resort areas of Colorado), and also more transplants from faraway places.

Many people whom I know here in the very diverse and mobile northern Atlanta suburbs visit different regions regularly - the national parks and Las Vegas out west are popular, as are Orlando and the Smoky Mountains in this part of the country. Others tend to visit their hometowns in any number of domestic and foreign locations.
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Old 11-03-2018, 12:48 PM
 
1,504 posts, read 521,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You seem to fail to consider the fact that mant residents of CO, CA, TX, FL, etc. are originally from other parts of the country. It would be next to impossible to determine how many natives of those states have not visited other regions of the country. Overall I think your premise doesn't seem to hold much water anyway and although those folks may not visit other regions of the country frequently, I think many have done so at least once or twice in their lifetimes.
Well, over here in California I've met people who have never been outside California, not even to Nevada or Arizona or Oregon or Baja California, not once in their lifetime. I've met other people who have been to Asia but never been to other U.S. states. I've met people who've been to other U.S. states but none of them are East of the Rockies.

I guess here in California, yes, alot of people are transplants. But you see, alot of the transplants are foreign transplants, meaning that they go abroad when the visit family, and may not have family in other U.S. states at all. Because California has hat a net negative domestic migration (more Californians move to other states than people from other states moving to California), so the population growth in California is mostly fueled by births and immigration from foreign countries.
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Old 11-03-2018, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,558 posts, read 743,256 times
Reputation: 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Well, over here in California I've met people who have never been outside California, not even to Nevada or Arizona or Oregon or Baja California, not once in their lifetime. I've met other people who have been to Asia but never been to other U.S. states. I've met people who've been to other U.S. states but none of them are East of the Rockies.

I guess here in California, yes, alot of people are transplants. But you see, alot of the transplants are foreign transplants, meaning that they go abroad when the visit family, and may not have family in other U.S. states at all. Because California has hat a net negative domestic migration (more Californians move to other states than people from other states moving to California), so the population growth in California is mostly fueled by births and immigration from foreign countries.
Some immigrant population groups that are well established in California are starting to form a critical mass in a variety of other states in recent years. As this occurs, less "assimilated" foreign transplants in California should become more inclined to venture elsewhere in the US. Stepping outside of one's comfort zone can be challenging, for Americans and immigrants alike. Also with California's high cost of living, some residents don't have the time and money to prioritize non-essential travel.
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Old 11-03-2018, 02:32 PM
 
751 posts, read 1,058,504 times
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I've lived in 5 different states. I don't think I ever met anyone who has NEVER been to another state.
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