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Old 11-06-2018, 04:31 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,046 posts, read 1,998,541 times
Reputation: 1754

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Yes, Franklin and Marshfield are highly representative of suburban towns in the Boston metropolitan area. Both of those towns are fully situated within the Boston metropolitan area, which is very geographically expansive. Additionally, both of those towns are high-income and home to high percentages of Irish- and Italian-Americans, another hallmark of Boston area suburbs.
Eh. Musicfamly5 said “Boston” and I took that to mean “the city and towns right outside of it”, but sure.

I wasn’t talking about ethnic makeups when I said the two towns didn’t represent the metro area. Based on my own experience with people from Franklin, I wouldn’t be surprised if there were a lot of people there who fit musicfamly5’s stereotype of Boston: folks who might claim to be distantly related to Marky Mark. However, if you drive to neighboring Holliston, you’d find far fewer of those types (at least in my experience).

I’ve never met anyone from Mansfield, and the only time I’ve been there was for a concert at the Xfinity Cebter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
You are familiar with virtue signaling, correct?

Plenty of rich white people do all the above as virtue signaling, I don't see how that doesn't make them part of the "Good ol' Boys Club"
I’m interested to hear how you’d define the “Good ol’ Boys Club”.
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Old 11-06-2018, 04:43 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,811 posts, read 1,309,711 times
Reputation: 3211
Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
I’m interested to hear how you’d define the “Good ol’ Boys Club”.
The wealthy elite. Largely located on, but not exclusive to the coastal areas. Both conservative and liberal. The Bushes or the Kennedys, pick your poison.

Limousine liberal types often buy electric cars or make token gestures of solidarity. Plenty of kids at Harvard who got in under their Daddy's name and not because they are particularly brilliant fall under this category. Virtue signaling by being apart of this cause or that cause, yet fundamentally aren't any different from their conservative counterparts. I wasn't smart or rich enough to get into Harvard, mind you, but I know people who did so my opinion is largely based of their experiences.
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Old 11-06-2018, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,086 posts, read 1,108,407 times
Reputation: 1854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
The wealthy elite. Largely located on, but not exclusive to the coastal areas. Both conservative and liberal. The Bushes or the Kennedys, pick your poison.

Limousine liberal types often buy electric cars or make token gestures of solidarity. Plenty of kids at Harvard who got in under their Daddy's name and not because they are particularly brilliant fall under this category. Virtue signaling by being apart of this cause or that cause, yet fundamentally aren't any different from their conservative counterparts. I wasn't smart or rich enough to get into Harvard, mind you, but I know people who did so my opinion is largely based of their experiences.
You just sound bitter my man.

Based on the above, I’m curious to hear how you think Boston’s elite/affluence differs from NYC, Seattle, San Francisco, and LA in the 21st century. Sounds like anyone could be a part of the ol’ boys club via your definition .
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:00 PM
 
224 posts, read 114,511 times
Reputation: 437
Quote:
Originally Posted by FL_Watch View Post
Travel to Aroostook County, Maine from Minnesota and THEN tell me that you just experienced a "culture shock". Rural Northern Minnesota has more in common with this part of Maine than it does with, say, SoCal.
I'm from New England, lived in Maine and now I live in Minnesota. The two are not actually "so" alike, beyond their demeanors, which aren't quite the same either.

Yes, they are both reserved, less busy, people living in more rural areas. Yet NE are typically straightforward, MN people communicate verbally and physically in a very indirect manner. NE people tend to the more liberal with some traditional ways. Northern MN people tend to the more conservative with some liberal ways (I'm not so much talking about politics here). NE people can be a little fuzzy and grey, MN people are cut and dried in their thinking. There are a million and one differences in food, familial expectations, etc. These are not small differences; they permeate everything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FL_Watch View Post
The northernmost portions of Vermont, Maine and to a lesser extent, New Hampshire really don't have much common with their neighbors to the immediate south.

Ancestry, politics, culture, friendliness, you name it. One thing I've noticed in far northern New England is that their attitudes and personalities are much less like the brashness of Boston or (especially) NYC, and more like the "soft-spoken and polite, but reserved and stoic" attitude of the Upper Midwest.
I've met people from VT, NH and ME here in the Upper Midwest. They all have stories about the differences between the cultures that they had to adjust to. According to this, since I'm from southern New England, they should have more in common with the locals here than they do with me. Yet we automatically "get" each other and they gravitate to me as a New Englander who can understand their perspective.

There are plenty of reserved, calm, quiet people in southern New England and Wisconsiners, for example, are nowhere near as reserved and soft-spoken as you're trying to portray.

Last edited by LeTraveler; 11-06-2018 at 05:26 PM..
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:01 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,046 posts, read 1,998,541 times
Reputation: 1754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
The wealthy elite. Largely located on, but not exclusive to the coastal areas. Both conservative and liberal. The Bushes or the Kennedys, pick your poison.
If that’s you’re definition, then it definitely isn’t something unique to Boston.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason345 View Post
I don't like the Northeast because the people there are usually pompous and provincial. I like almost everything else about it though.
This post makes you sound pompous and provincial.
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:48 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,811 posts, read 1,309,711 times
Reputation: 3211
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
You just sound bitter my man.

Based on the above, I’m curious to hear how you think Boston’s elite/affluence differs from NYC, Seattle, San Francisco, and LA in the 21st century. Sounds like anyone could be a part of the ol’ boys club via your definition .
Lol I'm sorry, what?

Yeah, of course the elite in any city can be part of the o'l boys club, some cities just have more elite than others. How does that make me bitter?

I just said people who virtue signal can be part of the elite. Activism doesn't make one not elite.
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Old 11-06-2018, 05:49 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,811 posts, read 1,309,711 times
Reputation: 3211
Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
If that’s you’re definition, then it definitely isn’t something unique to Boston.
Yeah, never said it was. Boston has more of those type of people per capita, but certainly isn't unique to Boston.
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Old 11-06-2018, 06:02 PM
 
3,613 posts, read 1,538,253 times
Reputation: 3039
Quote:
Originally Posted by FL_Watch View Post
Have you ever been to this part of the country? Are you aware that there is more to the NE than just Boston, NYC and Philly?

No, I am not a fan of the fast-paced, crowded, hostile atmosphere that can be found in Boston, NYC and Philly. But if you think that all of, say, Pennsylvania or Maine is one big concrete jungle with rabid left-wing hipsters and yuppies, then you would be blatantly wrong. Go up to, say, Central Pennsylvania from Eastern Tennessee and, aside from the accent and climate, you won't see any tremendous differences. Travel to Aroostook County, Maine from Minnesota and THEN tell me that you just experienced a "culture shock". Rural Northern Minnesota has more in common with this part of Maine than it does with, say, SoCal.

I feel like the Northeast gets an unfair rep because folks tend to associate all of it with pretentious Ivy League snobs from southern New England. This is simply not true. And for everyone who claims that the Northeast is too frigid for their liking, I have some news for you: North Dakota gets snow too.
I agree. There are a lot of generalizations and untrue stereotypes of the different regions of the U.S., especially the Northeast, South, and to some extent CA (SoCA is sooo different from NoCA in my experience). Each part of the different regions can be very different, even from county to county. For the most part, the differences are great. It's why I love traveling so much. Now, there are a couple of areas in the nation I have no desire to visit again anytime soon. But for the most part, there is something I like about every region of the country
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Old 11-06-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,086 posts, read 1,108,407 times
Reputation: 1854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Lol I'm sorry, what?

Yeah, of course the elite in any city can be part of the o'l boys club, some cities just have more elite than others. How does that make me bitter?

I just said people who virtue signal can be part of the elite. Activism doesn't make one not elite.
So Boston has a lot of elite activitists. Fair enough.
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Old 11-06-2018, 06:31 PM
 
Location: USA
17,846 posts, read 8,903,412 times
Reputation: 13365
Not all Ivy League grads are snobs. Not all Northeasterners are urbanized jerks either.
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