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Old 11-13-2018, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,412,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
I say Raleigh/Durham, NC. One of the best metros in the nation for IT and healthcare, especially for its size. Cost of living is reasonable.
I know nothing about it, but my data pull said about the same thing.
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Old 11-14-2018, 05:34 AM
 
376 posts, read 157,276 times
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If you don't mind me asking..do you use some online tool or is there something on the CD website that helps with this?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Count David View Post
I know nothing about it, but my data pull said about the same thing.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,412,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamanewuser View Post
If you don't mind me asking..do you use some online tool or is there something on the CD website that helps with this?
https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...es/index.xhtml
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:17 AM
 
1,036 posts, read 519,760 times
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Think outside the box - for healthcare, metros like Cincinnati, Columbus, St Louis, and even the Twin Cities are great options with good cost of living, and all would have IT work available if you couldn’t continue to work remotely. One doesn’t really need to be in a hub, per se, especially since there is a move to decentralize tech a bit to where there is more space and lower costs.
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Old 11-14-2018, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,554 posts, read 10,261,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamanewuser View Post
There's no free ride apparently. Is there a way to search places to live based on cost of living and other factors? How can I learn about various regions in US? So there's East Coast, West Coast, South, Mid West? Which is the overall best place/region to move to for long term?

How should I use this forum effectively to narrow down the choices?
Don't get wrapped up in the income tax vs. no income tax aspect. Tax Burden is is a better statistic.

Last edited by bluescreen73; 11-14-2018 at 09:28 AM..
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Old 11-14-2018, 11:25 AM
 
213 posts, read 77,435 times
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We were in a similar situation with the wife in medical and me in remote IT. Coming from the Bay Area we wanted to buy a house in a nice neighborhood and save money for early retirement. Wasn't possible out there. We've also lived in Chicago, Minneapolis, Madison, WI. Ultimately, we chose Shaker Heights in Cleveland. We bought an amazing house in an amazing neighborhood nearly outright, have an RTA station two blocks from us, we're ten minutes to all the cultural institutions at University Circle and some wonderful food in Little Italy, nearby great shopping, and the wife get's to work at the Cleveland Clinic - which she loves!

Minneapolis, Philly, Baltimore, Houston... are also good choices (each with their own respective pros/cons). Actually, we're planning on visiting Raleigh this winter because we've heard so much good about it.
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Old 11-14-2018, 12:09 PM
 
1,267 posts, read 747,613 times
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OP just forget about CA. I am in the tech field as well (work from home) and my girlfriend is a nurse. We are choosing to move to either Raleigh or Charlotte down in NC. Much better winters than where we are from in NY. The economies of Raleigh and Charlotte are booming compared to upstate NY. Lots of northeastern transplants to NC as well which is nice I suppose.

Newer housing stock in Charlotte with very good pricing. Raleigh is more expensive but it's the state capital and I'm sure it's a bit more recession-proof than anywhere else in the state because of that.

I have lived in Raleigh for the past year and a half. Don't want to live anywhere else for the time being. I've lived in Atlanta, Austin, Sarasota, Albany (NY), and out of everywhere my favorite state is NC. If you like mountainous areas, go to Asheville. If you like big urban cities, go to Charlotte. If you like a less stressful, more suburban feel, with a tech vibe, go to Raleigh. If you like the beach, go to Wilmington.

NC is the best bang for your buck in my opinion.
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Old 11-15-2018, 01:29 PM
 
376 posts, read 157,276 times
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Thank you for the link, great link for researching various things on locations.
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Originally Posted by Count David View Post
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Old 11-15-2018, 01:31 PM
 
376 posts, read 157,276 times
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Great suggestion! I'm not tying the IT work with location so much as the type of work I do, programming can be done from anywhere. Of course the trick is to find full time employment that would allow you to work fully remotely from day one. In my case, the location serves two purposes: opportunities for healthcare and great schools for kids.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmooky View Post
Think outside the box - for healthcare, metros like Cincinnati, Columbus, St Louis, and even the Twin Cities are great options with good cost of living, and all would have IT work available if you couldn’t continue to work remotely. One doesn’t really need to be in a hub, per se, especially since there is a move to decentralize tech a bit to where there is more space and lower costs.
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Old 11-15-2018, 01:33 PM
 
376 posts, read 157,276 times
Reputation: 56
Agree! that's a better measure. Would you say, property tax plus sales tax is a good way to start for evaluating that?
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Don't get wrapped up in the income tax vs. no income tax aspect. Tax Burden is is a better statistic.
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