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Old 11-11-2018, 08:35 PM
 
4,477 posts, read 2,659,202 times
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What does Christmas have to do with religion? It's only slightly more religious than New Year's. For example it's the biggest holiday of the year to me. I don't care if people say merry Christmas, though happy holidays is obviously easier.

This is a great thread...the defenders of the South are arguing against each other. It's not different! It's ok to be different!

As for that assumption of christianity, it's not true in my blue Northwest city. And that's what I'm talking about.
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Old 11-11-2018, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,580 posts, read 3,992,169 times
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I don't get the impression you have ever lived in the south. It appears you live in Seattle.

You claimed that there is an expectation that people go to church in the south but you can't specify any person who has this expectation or specify any consequences for not attending church.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 11-11-2018 at 09:08 PM..
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Old 11-11-2018, 09:32 PM
 
4,477 posts, read 2,659,202 times
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Did you honestly not read this thread?
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:22 AM
 
540 posts, read 259,802 times
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what all is this religion thingy?
we all stay put or move because we have a job there.
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:43 AM
 
904 posts, read 911,562 times
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I prefer the Southeast and not even close.
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:58 AM
 
Location: US
555 posts, read 456,915 times
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Climate wise I'm not sure either region wins. Much of the PNW is overcast and drizzle for 6 months vs the Southeast's 6 months of hot and humid weather.

Also the COL argument is starting to not hold up anymore. Good areas in Nashville and Atlanta are getting becoming nearly the same price as good areas in the PNW (excluding Seattle Proper). Also much of the South's housing stock is cheap tract homes or older decrepit homes; many of which are in either bad crime and school districts. That just brings the median cost of homes way down.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:49 AM
 
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I mean, I get a bunch of atheists, agnostics, muslims, and some buddhists who ask what church I go to. I somehow doubt they are pushing me to convert to Christianity.

You know how making eye contact is respectful in the US and how making eye contact is very disrespectful in Korea? Well, asking about religion, at least surface level like churches, is considered fine in the South while, apparently according to mhays25, taboo in the PNW, although my experience in suburban Seattle is different.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:50 AM
 
1,826 posts, read 1,248,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harrishawke View Post
Climate wise I'm not sure either region wins. Much of the PNW is overcast and drizzle for 6 months vs the Southeast's 6 months of hot and humid weather.

Also the COL argument is starting to not hold up anymore. Good areas in Nashville and Atlanta are getting becoming nearly the same price as good areas in the PNW (excluding Seattle Proper). Also much of the South's housing stock is cheap tract homes or older decrepit homes; many of which are in either bad crime and school districts. That just brings the median cost of homes way down.
I'd like proof that the good areas in Atlanta, Orlando, Tampa, Nashville, and Memphis are jearly the same as in Seattle and Portland, which I believe are the only metros in the region with similar populations.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:56 AM
 
5,611 posts, read 6,084,198 times
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PNW

I am not a fan of conservativism and the sacreligous people of the bible belt. I don't like the way southern cities function. It is so much easier to live and get a long with the people in the PNW.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 638,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Count David View Post
Because it presumes that the invited is Christian, and/or because it presumes the invited is interested in sharing their religion (or even lack thereof) with the inviter.

In the South, no bones are made about how Christian the place is. I went to a public high school graduation in Lewis County, TN and they reminded us that they were a Christian school in a Christian town about every five minutes on average, with no less than four breaks to pray during the ceremony.....at a PUBLIC school.

I'm sorry, but as a lifelong Westerner, I found this to be pretty odd, because we are taught the complete opposite of ^that from a pretty early age; and our public schools are decidedly secular across the board. A Northwesterner would likely consider it pretty appalling, because it leaves no place (or at least a considerably less marked place) for those who are not Christian (or any religion at all).

Keep in mind, the Northwest is likely the most apathetic place towards religion in the country.
Until relatively recently, public schools throughout America, including the vast majority of state-funded colleges and universities, had a generally Protestant tone. Remember, the United States is a country that was settled by Protestants and founded under Protestant principles (e.g., hard work, prudence, tolerance, frugality, etc.). Therefore, Roman Catholic immigrants who arrived in the mid-19th century, in particular the Irish, developed a network of primary and secondary schools to circumvent American public schools, which mostly served and, of course, catered to Protestant children. Later on, as public schools secularized to varying degrees, the Roman Catholic schools solidified their faith-based curriculum and, as a result, were further differentiated from American public schools.

Since Tennessee received virtually no Roman Catholic immigration and has a small-to-non-existent liberal Episcopalian and/or Congregationalist contingent advocating for secularization, I presume the public school curriculum and the general approach of educators in rural parts of the state are not radically different from what they were 100 years ago.

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 11-12-2018 at 11:11 AM..
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