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Old 11-09-2018, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Killeen, Tx
220 posts, read 125,136 times
Reputation: 145

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Quote:
Originally Posted by westsaeed View Post
As a resident of Sacramento, I can concur the city is booming with new development in every nook and cranny of the city center which is both a gift and a curse. The growth is great, not sure if the infrastructure is quite ready for the boom with traffic being at an all time worse at most hours of the work day. New restaurants, hotels and retail stores are popping up everywhere and this looks like just the tip of the ice burg.
Is the growth mostly from people leaving the Bay Area or is it also from people from other regions?
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Old 11-09-2018, 10:58 PM
 
4,492 posts, read 2,686,554 times
Reputation: 4104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TacoSoup View Post
No kidding. I never understood why people on this site are always bragging about growth and getting into pi***ng matches about whose city is growing faster. Yeah maybe if you own large parcels of land and/or multiple properties itís nice, but for the average citizen itís not worth it. At least I donít think so as Iíve seen my county (San Diego) basically double in size since I was a kid. Be careful what you wish for when it comes to growth.
I freaking love my city growing like crazy. (This was long before I started working for a general contractor!) In my area a large percentage of growth is infill...this gained steam in the 1980s and has hit a fever pitch in this decade. Every year things are denser, more international, more transit-oriented...I love every minute of it. Well not the damn dogs on every street corner, but everything else.
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Old 11-09-2018, 11:33 PM
 
772 posts, read 714,818 times
Reputation: 1048
Several of those cities aren't really "secondary" cities IMO - especially Atlanta, Dallas, and Austin.

All of these cities are booming because all of the "first tier" cities (i.e - all the major west coast and northeast metros) have simply become too unaffordable for those not in highly lucrative careers, and/or because of people looking to flee from the other problems of first tier metros.

It's very well possible that some of these boomtowns may begin to suffer from some of the same problems as the places that people are fleeing from, but I think the magnitude of such depends on how well poised a city is to handle growth, as well as how much growth there is. Here in Seattle for example (where COL has gone from "above average" to one of the most expensive cities in the US in the past 5-10 years), natural geography (and to some extent, local opposition to development) has made it a challenge to build more housing without razing existing structures, and also to expand transit infrastructure - at least in a way that serves private automobiles (development of a rail system that is decades overdue has began in recent years).

I think many of the "tier two" cities have a fair bit of room for growth before they start seeing big city problems as bad as the majority of the coastal metros - but that's likely why they're experiencing big influxes of growth without too negative of consequences just yet.
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Old 11-10-2018, 10:05 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,626 posts, read 3,693,281 times
Reputation: 12453
The label "secondary" seems odd in some cases and being a boomtown is not something to wish for. Regardless, people will move where they can afford to live...boomtown or not.

A quote from the article: "In the third quarter of 2018, the ability to afford a home was down to its lowest level in a decade, according to an analysis by ATTOM Data Solutions, an Irvine, Calif.-based property database. In 78 percent of markets, home prices were less affordable than their historic averages." People are being priced out of the housing market in places because (a) affordable homes are not being built where they are needed or are so undesirable that (aspiring) middle class families will relocate instead, and (b) the burden of student loans is so great that many couples can't afford to buy or can't qualify for a loan in desirable markets.
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Old 11-11-2018, 08:35 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,786 posts, read 2,572,427 times
Reputation: 3021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flightoficarus87 View Post
Several of those cities aren't really "secondary" cities IMO - especially Atlanta, Dallas, and Austin.

All of these cities are booming because all of the "first tier" cities (i.e - all the major west coast and northeast metros) have simply become too unaffordable for those not in highly lucrative careers, and/or because of people looking to flee from the other problems of first tier metros.

It's very well possible that some of these boomtowns may begin to suffer from some of the same problems as the places that people are fleeing from, but I think the magnitude of such depends on how well poised a city is to handle growth, as well as how much growth there is. Here in Seattle for example (where COL has gone from "above average" to one of the most expensive cities in the US in the past 5-10 years), natural geography (and to some extent, local opposition to development) has made it a challenge to build more housing without razing existing structures, and also to expand transit infrastructure - at least in a way that serves private automobiles (development of a rail system that is decades overdue has began in recent years).

I think many of the "tier two" cities have a fair bit of room for growth before they start seeing big city problems as bad as the majority of the coastal metros - but that's likely why they're experiencing big influxes of growth without too negative of consequences just yet.
Austin is definitely secondary. Atlanta, and Dallas however are not.
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Old 11-11-2018, 09:39 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
1,233 posts, read 513,445 times
Reputation: 1771
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I freaking love my city growing like crazy. (This was long before I started working for a general contractor!) In my area a large percentage of growth is infill...this gained steam in the 1980s and has hit a fever pitch in this decade. Every year things are denser, more international, more transit-oriented...I love every minute of it. Well not the damn dogs on every street corner, but everything else.
I shouldíve of added those in real estate and the construction business to people that like growth. May I ask what city youíre referring to? Also while you claim things are more transit oriented now, howís the traffic for those that cannot rely on public transportation? What about housing costs? What has happened with the homeless population during this growth too? Iíll go out on a limb and say all of these have dramatically increased.

I will say growth can be nice if you live there and donít leave your little bubble or just visit the city. All the things you mentioned can definitely be a positive, but I stand by my statement that it sucks for the average citizen, especially those whoíve been living there a long time and are used to a certain quality of life. Thatís just my opinion though with my city and those Iím really familiar with and/or I have family in.
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Old 11-11-2018, 09:49 AM
 
4,492 posts, read 2,686,554 times
Reputation: 4104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TacoSoup View Post
I shouldíve of added those in real estate and the construction business to people that like growth. May I ask what city youíre referring to? Also while you claim things are more transit oriented now, howís the traffic for those that cannot rely on public transportation? What about housing costs? What has happened with the homeless population during this growth too? Iíll go out on a limb and say all of these have dramatically increased.

I will say growth can be nice if you live there and donít leave your little bubble or just visit the city. All the things you mentioned can definitely be a positive, but I stand by my statement that it sucks for the average citizen, especially those whoíve been living there a long time and are used to a certain quality of life. Thatís just my opinion though with my city and those Iím really familiar with and/or I have family in.
My point was I was a nerd for my city's growth long before I worked for a construction company...starting as a kid actually. (If only the netwebs were around back then!)

Seattle.

Traffic? Both transit and traffic are bursting at the seams. We focus capacity expansions on the transit side. I don't deal with this though, other than tapping some fenders when idiots' cars are in crosswalks against the light. For transit riders, most of our rail and much of our bus system is in transit/hov lanes, so that's often faster.

Housing costs are high, but still maybe 60% of the San Francisco area's. We're building way more than they are. In 2018 apartment rents are close to flat vs. 2017 for this reason.
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Old 11-11-2018, 11:10 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
1,233 posts, read 513,445 times
Reputation: 1771
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
My point was I was a nerd for my city's growth long before I worked for a construction company...starting as a kid actually. (If only the netwebs were around back then!)

Seattle.

Traffic? Both transit and traffic are bursting at the seams. We focus capacity expansions on the transit side. I don't deal with this though, other than tapping some fenders when idiots' cars are in crosswalks against the light. For transit riders, most of our rail and much of our bus system is in transit/hov lanes, so that's often faster.

Housing costs are high, but still maybe 60% of the San Francisco area's. We're building way more than they are. In 2018 apartment rents are close to flat vs. 2017 for this reason.
You couldnít of picked a better city for me to comment on. Some of my earliest and fondest memories from childhood are from Seattle as I lived there from age 3-6 in the late 70ís / early 80ís. Iíve been there more times than I can remember over the last 36 years and spent good chunks of my summers there up to age 18. I still have aunts, uncles, and cousins with their kids living there. And I still go at least once every year or two as well.

While it may not apply to you traffic is horrible there. You say itís 60% of San Francisco prices, but California is a bargain compared to Seattle when you factor in the lousy weather. While my Uncles were able to buy cheaply in the 70ís & 80ís, I have cousins that arenít able to afford to where they grew up, even with their good salaries and two incomes in some cases. I notice you didnít comment on the homeless population, howís that doing? You really donít need to answer that.

Iím glad you like the growth, but I have a dozen family members that donít. I donít know how old you are, but my cousins liked the growth too when they were younger but despise it now. To each their own I guess.
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Old 11-11-2018, 04:05 PM
 
4,492 posts, read 2,686,554 times
Reputation: 4104
After your introductory paragraph, what I'm getting is:
--You don't want to live in Seattle. (Yes we need to crack down on homeless behavior.)
--Other people have different opinions. (Surprise!)

PS, since you wonder, I'm a little older than you are.
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Old 11-11-2018, 04:36 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,739 posts, read 5,129,231 times
Reputation: 2847
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
Austin is definitely secondary. Atlanta, and Dallas however are not.
Agreed, people get butt hurt over the "secondary" line.

Austin, Charlotte, Raleigh, Orlando, Tampa, and a bunch more are 100% secondary.

Atlanta and Dallas are large cities and metros. They are not the most attractive, but they are major regions like Chicago, Philadelphia, DC, etc.
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