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Old 11-18-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
943 posts, read 414,687 times
Reputation: 460

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Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
I guess it depends on where you live in the desert. We lived in a suburb of Phoenix several years ago and having lived in the upper Midwest/Great Lakes region all of our lives the scenery at first seemed very exotic and the sunshine was glorious.

After a few months, we felt more and more like everything was basically some shade of tan or brown: most houses and commercial buildings were tan/brown, the land was tan/brown, the mountains were tan/brown...and we got tired of it. We also, believe it or not, got tired of the relentless sunshine. At first it is great but then after a few months it starts to feel like a continuous laser beam and it's like you're just kind of wishing for at least a partly cloudy day and on a day when it actually rains you just want to go outside and play in it.

Obviously, not everyone would agree and that's great, different strokes for different folks. But I can tell you that when we flew back into Michigan when we moved back home, I wanted to get out and kiss all of that "ugly/basic looking greenery". Even the weeds in the ditches looked beautiful to me!
Yeah, I am different than you. I definitely don't like dynamic weather like what you get back East. I'd prefer to have a constant of a good climate. Yeah, some of the architecture out in the desert West can be ugly.
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Old 11-18-2018, 02:13 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
943 posts, read 414,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Sounds like you need a halfway point, like Denver. Somewhat green, but brown for a good chunk of the year because it's not rainy. Denver is sunny, not hot, and rains a bit more than desert climates. It's plains, sure, but there's mountains nearby.

When you posted in the Arizona forum it's clear you wouldn't like it here. That's not going to change. What you want doesn't work here. Maybe Albuquerque since it's colder, but it still has the desert cons (minus the hot desert, because its cold desert).
I took a like into looking at New Mexico. I am not sure if having a 2 million population is too small for me or not. I did some research on living in small metro areas such as ABQ metro area. I heard New Mexico does have cold winters, but I heard it's beautiful compared to the East, because the air is dryer, so temperatures in the 30s are not going to feel intense like what I feel in NJ. The humid East winter coldness can be felt through your bones. Also, NM sounds like they don't get extreme snow like the East.
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Old 11-18-2018, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,644,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I took a like into looking at New Mexico. I am not sure if having a 2 million population is too small for me or not. I did some research on living in small metro areas such as ABQ metro area. I heard New Mexico does have cold winters, but I heard it's beautiful compared to the East, because the air is dryer, so temperatures in the 30s are not going to feel intense like what I feel in NJ. The humid East winter coldness can be felt through your bones. Also, NM sounds like they don't get extreme snow like the East.
Again, why not Denver?
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Old 11-18-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,561 posts, read 10,274,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Again, why not Denver?
Agreed. If OP can afford to live in Denver or Colorado Springs the Front Range has desert-like features with (dry) forests nearby. It's not technically a desert here, though.

Here's a picture of the Lone Tree area on the south side of Denver.


Here's a picture from Alderfer/Three Sisters Park near Evergeen.


Wildflower season in the high country is pretty awesome, too.
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Old 11-18-2018, 02:40 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,577 posts, read 3,667,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
Pros of living in deserts:
1. Less lawn work. Grass may not grow as fast, or you may not have grass at all. You can own a big piece of land do less to it.
2. Less dampness/humidity is better!
3. Something about the desert sounds like the scenery could be more dramatic!
4. Colorfulness in the scenery
5. More sunshine
6. Less chances of precipitation like snow, but it still does snow badly in some desert climates.

Cons of living in deserts:
1. Can't grow plants and crops!
2. Hot desert climates are dangerous and brutal.
3. Too Perfect desert climates like suburban parts of AZ (Sedona, Prescott, etc) attract too many retirees.
4. Sandstorms.
5. Lack of water.
6. Less woodsy areas to "hide" in.

In the West, is a desert better than the greenery? Deserts are making me excited and I am watching driving timelapse videos on the internet and I seem to gravitate towards deserts.
I moved to NM in 2013 from the midwest and love the high desert. What follows is about the high desert in New Mexico. Arizona and Nevada are mostly lower in elevation and have a different sort of desert climate. The Sonora desert is in Arizona while New Mexico has the more diverse Chihuahuan desert. New Mexico is sparsely populated (2 million) and a high level of positive diversity among the three different cultures.

1. Grass? What is grass? I have not heard a lawnmower in five years. There is still some yard work but not drudgery if you adopt natural landscaping. You can have grass in the city but most people consider it a waste of water and effort.
2. The humidity here is so low that I figured I would die when I saw it was 8%...I didn't. I've seen it at 4% and I love it. It takes a little bit, a few weeks, to adjust.
3. In the desert, you see the muscle and bones of the landscape. You see how the earth is put together. I love that it isn't shrouded in trees.
4. There is a lot of colors, even various shades of green, but much of the green is muted. The fall Aspen and Cottonwood colors rival anything back east. The minerals and ages of the rocks add to the color.
5. Sunshine? Lordy...we got sunshine and the high elevation makes it pretty intense. Traditional houses have shaded outdoor living spaces. There is a good reason for that.
6. Precipitation is concentrated in the summer monsoons and some winter snow and a little rain in the spring. I think we get maybe 10 inches a year. Snow is usually gone in hours, not days or weeks.
7. One can grow crops with proper irrigation. Some communities have acequia irrigation systems that go back several hundred years to water farm plots. I have become a master of container gardening but I have several trees and shrubs that tolerate dry conditions.
8. The common perception of the hot desert tends to be the lower elevation desert, like in parts of Arizona. The High desert is seldom very hot. We might see 100 degrees one or two days a year and most people do not have AC but use a swamp cooler instead.
9. I'm a retiree...what's wrong with that (sniff). They spend money but don't compete for jobs.
10. Sandstorms? I have never encountered a sandstorm. We do have a windy season in the spring and sometimes it kicks up some dust but no sandstorms.
11. Lack of water? This is the desert. I have a well that works fine but there are some issues with water in places.
12. Access to woodsy-ness? I see mountains and forests all around but I live in the desert. I can be in a pine forest in 30 minutes. Our bosque forest (Cottonwoods along the river) offers hiking and fitness trails and is maybe ten minutes away.
13. The low humidity and clarity of the sky produce a different quality of light in the day and the night sky is a sight to behold. As a photographer, I notice the light and it is different.
14. We don't have hurricanes or tornados. We caught a little rain from a tropical storm this year that came up from Mexico. We don't have earthquakes (lately, anyway). We do have forest fires.

Cimarron River


Valles Caldera


Sierra Ladrones


Jemez Mountains


Guadalupe Canyon


Near Cabezon

Last edited by SunGrins; 11-18-2018 at 03:03 PM..
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Old 11-18-2018, 03:07 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,020,568 times
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As I mentioned, I was in Scottsdale, and loved it. Don't think, though, that the two (or so) variety of trees won't get boring, if you're bored by all the trees in the east. I love trees, and the dark green. Everything in Phoenix was light green, and, as I said, you see more cactus, than trees. I loved it, but give me green trees, houses that aren't stucco, and water. I live in WI, and we have lots of water here, to enjoy. Boating, water-skiing, nights around a campfire next to the water...I couldn't give that up.
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Old 11-18-2018, 04:06 PM
 
21,195 posts, read 30,379,606 times
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[quote=potanta;53675744]The East Coast has generic looking trees. If you asked a child to draw a picture of a "tree", they would just draw an ordinary tree, which is what you find back East. Personally, I think ordinary trees are ugly. /QUOTE]

Is this Donald Trump? I mean, this reads like one of his tweets. Generic-looking trees drawn by children are what's representative of east coast trees??? I just can't...
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Old 11-18-2018, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,347 posts, read 7,426,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
As I mentioned, I was in Scottsdale, and loved it. Don't think, though, that the two (or so) variety of trees won't get boring, if you're bored by all the trees in the east. I love trees, and the dark green. Everything in Phoenix was light green, and, as I said, you see more cactus, than trees. I loved it, but give me green trees, houses that aren't stucco, and water. I live in WI, and we have lots of water here, to enjoy. Boating, water-skiing, nights around a campfire next to the water...I couldn't give that up.
Ditto. This is exactly what I grew to miss about the Midwest when we lived in a suburb of Phoenix. Again, different strokes for different folks, but to me, a big, old maple tree against a blue sky with puffy clouds and a cornfield in the background is a beautiful sight, as is a crystal blue lake surrounded by big, leafy, deciduous trees. Moving to Arizona made me really appreciate what we have here.
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Old 11-18-2018, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,866 posts, read 1,259,798 times
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It has to be greenery for me. While I find individual species of cacti and succulents interesting, I can enjoy them quite well in my home and in the summer, set them outside

I notice the various shades of green in the forest and the various forms/species of trees and plants. Generally where there is green, there is water and that is a must for me.

I've spent time traveling in the desert SW for work and while the people were nice enough and I liked the amenities well enough, I found the scenery outright unattractive. Brown upon brown, a lack of trees, plants and water. It just wasn't appealing to me.







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Old 11-18-2018, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,477 posts, read 2,370,744 times
Reputation: 1809
Different strokes for different folks, but there is one inconsistency that I've never understood. If you live in the green eastern part of the country, the vegetation is cold-dormant (down to the gulf coast). You've got 3 to 5 months where there is virtually no greenery. In contrast, the subtropical arid and semi-arid deserts (which are far less green then the eastern areas in the growing season) are much more alive-looking in the winter-time. If greenery is so important than it seems like you wouldn't be able to stand the brown of an eastern winter. Florida or the PNW would probably be the best places for you.
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