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Old 11-20-2018, 05:57 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 413,204 times
Reputation: 460

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Quote:
Originally Posted by new2colo View Post
Any desert environment can be green with just a little bit of water. I think people who donít live in desert environments or those who havenít been to the desert have this idea that there are hundreds of miles of just treeless, brown landscape. Many desert locations in the West are interspersed with mountains that receive considerably more rain, and, in some cases, snow, than the desert floor. Also, areas along rivers can support large, leafy trees like cottonwoods. If a person is ever sick of the lack of natural greenery in a particular spot, it doesnít usually take that much travel time to get to a place thatís much greener.

Our water situation here in AZ is dire. As others have said, the desert was never meant to support 7 million people.

The intensity of the sunlight is extreme regardless of the time of year. Sure, pictures of sunny Phoenix make many jealous, especially during the winter. However, what you canít see is how the sun can be so intense that itís not uncommon to break out in a sweat, even this time of year. The difference in apparent temperature between shady areas and areas that are in direct sunlight is enormous. The moment the sun sets, especially during the cooler months, it can feel as though the temperature has dropped 10-20 degrees over the course of an hour.

The Sonoran Desert is home to a much greater number of venomous wildlife species. We do have spiders (black widows and brown recluses), snakes (rattlesnakes), scorpions, javelina, Africanized bees, and wasps that can all cause serious issues if a person is in the wrong place at the wrong time. Most of our native trees, bushes and cacti have thorns that can very easily cause a person to bleed if they are touched.

The lack of humidity and precipitation helps to prevent many things from developing rust. In Phoenix, itís not uncommon to see 30+ year old cars on the road that are completely free of rust. I see cars from the 60s and 70s almost daily on my commute.

The dry air can be irritating. Some people find the lack of humidity to be comfortable. However, it can easily dry out skin and cause chapped lips. I slather on lotion and lip balm several times a day to avoid feeling itchy and like my skin is cracking.

Traveling to a location with dense vegetation can be claustrophobia inducing after having lived in the desert. I can see mountains that are almost 80 miles away from my house daily from my living room. To leave that environment to one thatís boxed in by trees and vines can be unsettling.
I totally agree with you. People here in the East are obsessed with just the East and whenever I bring up conversations about the West, they seem so disinterested. People from the East only value greenery and they think the desert is completely ugly and completely uninhabitable. Here in America, we are blessed that our deserts are interspersed with mountains and many plants, which add to the scenery and habitability, while in some countries, the desert can be really blank with absolutely nothing.

Guess, what the benefit of intense sunlight means I can wear sunglasses, and sunglasses make me look hot as hell.

I am actually shocked that there are cars in the desert that are completely free of rust. Whenever I hear about desert stereotypes in the media or in video games, I always see rusty old cars with hippies.

I like the lack of humidity, but there are occasional days where I want a bit of humidity where it feels exotic.

I actually don't mind being boxed in with trees. Best part about having the woods back East is that I can hide and go seek in the woods. I enjoyed playing man hunt is areas with trees. At least the deserts in America can have some of that.
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Old 11-21-2018, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,192 posts, read 2,641,712 times
Reputation: 2226
A big thing is your body, and where you feel balanced. As a person with drier fair skin, I don't like the aridity of Colorado. I'm constantly thirsty and I have to run a humidifier or my skin dries out and cracks. My eyes feel dry often. I don't sweat a lot.

Other people sweat a whole lot and have different skin so the dry weather is much more comfortable for them. I don't have allergies, other people do, so the arid environment has less allergens for them.

People love sunshine, but that's because people in general aren't outside a whole lot. Sunshine gets old when you have to put sunscreen on every time you plan to be outside for more than 1 hour and multiple times a day if your outside all day. If I tanned instead of burned, this wouldn't be as big of an issue.

Also, it seems like the people that like arid scenery like big picture views while those who like lusher scenery like looking at details of plants and animals up close. For me, I don't like it when every plant is covered in thorns. It detracts from the wander around outside experience.
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Old 11-29-2018, 12:31 AM
 
17,662 posts, read 4,062,179 times
Reputation: 5587
I prefer the desert over greenery,OP.
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Old 11-29-2018, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
The East Coast has generic looking trees. If you asked a child to draw a picture of a "tree", they would just draw an ordinary tree, which is what you find back East. Personally, I think ordinary trees are ugly. The only thing that makes them beautiful is the colors in Autumn. There are some places in the East that are so beautiful that I won't even see it as ugly. There are places in Vermont I have visited (in August) that have ordinary trees and exotic looking trees and I think all of that was beautiful.
Have you ever considered that "ordinary" is subjective? You're used to the trees of your area because you grew up around them.

Don't for a minute pretend the east is uniform in its forestry either. My home state alone has five distinct varieties of forestry.

It's fine if you personally think the east is ugly, but do not sell it as objective fact, thank you.
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Old 11-29-2018, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
296 posts, read 137,919 times
Reputation: 480
I like green grass and trees over desert sand and dried grass. I like the change the seasons have with the trees from bare in the winter, to flowers and buds in the spring, to full leaves in the summer, and the change of colors in the fall.
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Old 11-29-2018, 04:53 PM
 
6,479 posts, read 4,069,179 times
Reputation: 16726
I don't live either in the desert or in lush greenery, but I can appreciate both. One thing about the desert that I really love is the clean, wide open, unobstructed view. I like seeing a wide expanse of land with mountains in the background. And the desert is austere, in a good way. It is a harsh environment, but uncluttered.

Where I live (coastal Southern California) isn't desert, but it's more like the desert in this regard, so that's probably why I feel this way. It is nice to see lots of green plants and grass and trees, but when I've spent more than a short time in a heavily forested area, it started to feel a little oppressive. I felt this way in the Seattle area, for instance: too many tall trees, not enough sky and no real views; I felt like I couldn't really see what was around me.
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Old 11-30-2018, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,047,623 times
Reputation: 9577
I need trees. I need greenery. Whether it be on the east coast or the pacific northwest. The wide open brown spaces are great to visit but to live, give me the sultry damp feel of greenery.
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Old 11-30-2018, 11:30 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 413,204 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
A big thing is your body, and where you feel balanced. As a person with drier fair skin, I don't like the aridity of Colorado. I'm constantly thirsty and I have to run a humidifier or my skin dries out and cracks. My eyes feel dry often. I don't sweat a lot.

Other people sweat a whole lot and have different skin so the dry weather is much more comfortable for them. I don't have allergies, other people do, so the arid environment has less allergens for them.

People love sunshine, but that's because people in general aren't outside a whole lot. Sunshine gets old when you have to put sunscreen on every time you plan to be outside for more than 1 hour and multiple times a day if your outside all day. If I tanned instead of burned, this wouldn't be as big of an issue.

Also, it seems like the people that like arid scenery like big picture views while those who like lusher scenery like looking at details of plants and animals up close. For me, I don't like it when every plant is covered in thorns. It detracts from the wander around outside experience.
The best part of the PNW is that no sunshine = less damage to the eyes! I have dark skin, but I'd still not want extreme sunshine, because sunshine speeds up aging and I still wear sunscreen no matter what. I ike the desert scenery. I can watch Youtube videos of desert scenery for many days and not get bored of it.
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Old 11-30-2018, 11:34 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 413,204 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Have you ever considered that "ordinary" is subjective? You're used to the trees of your area because you grew up around them.

Don't for a minute pretend the east is uniform in its forestry either. My home state alone has five distinct varieties of forestry.

It's fine if you personally think the east is ugly, but do not sell it as objective fact, thank you.
That's not true. NJ is a state where scenery is hard to find, but personally I think our trees are the most generic trees. I prefer the trees very up north such as in Vermont, New Hampshire, or Maine.
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Old 11-30-2018, 11:37 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 413,204 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bailey340 View Post
I like green grass and trees over desert sand and dried grass. I like the change the seasons have with the trees from bare in the winter, to flowers and buds in the spring, to full leaves in the summer, and the change of colors in the fall.
It is all matter of opinion for each person, but I like the stagnant weather and would miss the four seasons at the same time. Stagnant weather is better for me. Less snowstorms, less hurricanes, and less chances of weather destroying your home, and less chances of flooding land (however desert weather can encourage wildfires). Of course the West "Coast" has earthquakes, so nowhere is perfect and free from natural disasters of all kinds. I would miss four seasons mainly because of the way plants look in Autumn and Spring.
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