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Old 11-26-2018, 09:28 AM
 
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Lake Michigan takes a bit to warm up, so you can swim comfortably from around July 1st to the end of September.
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Old 11-26-2018, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Swam in the ocean in NJ in early September but likely could have later in the month, too.
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Old 11-26-2018, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Over in much of coastal California, the answer is "almost never!" Even during the summer the ocean water seldom rises above 72 degrees--even down south in San Diego! 75 degrees is what most would call very marginal for swimming.

The local creeks dry completely up every summer, and most reservoirs don't allow swimming.
This completely surprised me. I have a friend who grew up with me in NJ but has lived in LA for most of her adult life. She came to visit her sister at in a NJ beach town and mentioned that she rarely swims in the Pacific because it's too cold and the Atlantic is much warmer.

That seemed to make no sense to me. It's hot most of the time in southern California--how can the ocean be too cold for swimming? Especially compared to the Atlantic in NJ?
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Old 11-26-2018, 10:14 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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I swim in the Chesapeake Bay near Annapolis until around mid-September.

After that, it's no longer warm enough.
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Old 11-26-2018, 03:12 PM
 
1,508 posts, read 527,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
This completely surprised me. I have a friend who grew up with me in NJ but has lived in LA for most of her adult life. She came to visit her sister at in a NJ beach town and mentioned that she rarely swims in the Pacific because it's too cold and the Atlantic is much warmer.

That seemed to make no sense to me. It's hot most of the time in southern California--how can the ocean be too cold for swimming? Especially compared to the Atlantic in NJ?
I'm not exactly a meteorologist or oceanographer, but here's how it is:

Coastal Southern California actually stays cool (average high temps around 75 or so) even during the summer. BUT Inland Southern California averages 20 degrees hotter, 95 degrees or so. Basically, the temperature increases very rapidly as you go inland. However, even during heat waves, when the coast can get up to 95 degrees, the water is still cold.

I suppose the cold current of the Pacific means that the moderating effect of the ocean on land temperatures is much weaker than it would be on the East or Gulf Coasts. It also means that nights in Coastal Southern California are downright chilly--55 degrees even during the summer. Also, even if it's been 95 degrees in Inland Southern California, it will still cool off to 55 degrees at night. It's certainly not fun to see such chilly temps in the summer.

Tourists come to Coastal SoCal (where all the tourist attractions are), and assume that all of SoCal has such mild summers. Then, when they actually move here, they find out how insanely expensive Coastal SoCal is and then they have no choice but to settle in brutally hot inland SoCal. It is definitely a bait-and-switch!
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Old 11-26-2018, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
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Last weekend
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Old 11-26-2018, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
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October in Rhode Island. Especially at the Narragansett Bay beaches.
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Old 11-26-2018, 06:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
This completely surprised me. I have a friend who grew up with me in NJ but has lived in LA for most of her adult life. She came to visit her sister at in a NJ beach town and mentioned that she rarely swims in the Pacific because it's too cold and the Atlantic is much warmer.

That seemed to make no sense to me. It's hot most of the time in southern California--how can the ocean be too cold for swimming? Especially compared to the Atlantic in NJ?
In California, you have a cold current always coming down from Alaska, so the ocean is too cold to swim in without a wet suit. Southern California has a mild climate, but the ocean is cold because of that current.
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Old 11-26-2018, 07:01 PM
 
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We can swim year round here in South Texas, whether it be in a pool or in the Gulf of Mexico.
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Old 11-27-2018, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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There used to be public swimming areas in the finger lakes of NY, but now since the land is pretty much all privately owned by snooty rich people and the parks have generally banned swimming, that's total history.

Granted, I live at the southern ends. It could be a different story way up north where the land is flatter and there are more large beaches.

And of course thanks to the "brilliance" of Cornell, Cayuga lake is always suffering some new invasion of something.
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