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Old 01-03-2019, 10:25 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
I have never been to Denver; it may be 180 degrees from Salt Lake City, I don't know. But Salt Lake City is very similar to Santa Clarita, Riverside, or San Bernardino/Inland Empire; you'd agree, right?
I've never been to those places in CA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Yes! This is what I'm trying to say. The West (except for Alaska and Hawaii) is basically a giant extension of California.

California has all the major regions of the West: Pacific Northwest fog and redwoods (near Eureka), Mountain West skiing, with 300 inches of snow, mostly powder (near Tahoe and Mammoth Mountain), a mini-Yellowstone (Lassen National Park's geothermal activity), the Desert Southwest (Mojave and Sonoran deserts, including Victorville and Palm Springs).

And SLC totally is just Santa Clarita or the Inland Empire with more Mormons and snow! Let's not forget the large Mormon population in the Inland Empire, or the fact that the San Bernardino Mountains actually rival the Wasatch Range in height and ruggedness. It's not like Utah has its own special accent or special food different from California, unlike Louisiana, with its creole and cajun food and Southern accents.
LOL, SLC is the same but different! Too funny. Denver is not as arid as SLC, and the surrounding area is farmland to the east and mountain forests to the west. SLC is pretty desert-y.
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Old 01-03-2019, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,558 posts, read 3,709,954 times
Reputation: 4152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I've never been to those places in CA.



LOL, SLC is the same but different! Too funny. Denver is not as arid as SLC, and the surrounding area is farmland to the east and mountain forests to the west. SLC is pretty desert-y.
I agree that Salt Lake City is "pretty desert-y", but only to the west. The impressive Wasatch Front is right on the doorstep of SLC, and even moreso as you move south to Provo.
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Old 01-03-2019, 10:49 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,825 posts, read 12,338,063 times
Reputation: 4779
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
But isn't Texas a "Whole 'nother Country" .....
The interesting thing about Texas is that it feels like the essence of the "real America" but at the same time is somewhat unique in America. It does match many foreigners cowboy image of America as well as their images of suburban America as well. The Texas Panhandle has got to be one of the most authentically American places anywhere.
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Old 01-03-2019, 10:56 PM
 
482 posts, read 140,192 times
Reputation: 679
New York
Los Angeles
Boise
Birmingham
Cleveland

Almost all walks of life and all major American cultures can be found in these cities. NY and LA are melting pots. Boise represents white America. Birmingham has both southern culture and southern black culture. Cleveland is a working man's town. It represents the ultimate working class city IMO.
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Old 01-05-2019, 03:20 PM
 
0 posts, read 489 times
Reputation: 14
1. Los Angeles (Hollywood, show biz, skating, surfing, cultural exports, West Coast, soft power, movies, music, marijuana culture, Hispanic Immigration, the beach, mountains)
2. NYC (Urban, NE USA, American Jews, money, melting pot, multiculturalism, tv shows, subway, density, ivy league)
3. Dallas/Fort Worth (Sunbelt, Hispanic immigration, suburban, religious, sprawl/automobiles, economic boom, growth, pick up trucks, obesity, highways, low taxes, affordability, guns)
4. Detroit (Midwest, snow, 4 seasons, economic decline, segregation, gun violence, rust belt, population decline, urban decay, race relations, automobiles, poverty, blue collar)
5. San Francisco (Tech, big business, Asian immigration, facebook, google, high salaries, high cost of living, highly educated, homeless people, angel investors, venture capital, entrepreneurs, apps, hiking, nature)
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Old 01-06-2019, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,914 posts, read 6,549,966 times
Reputation: 5388
Home town guy, admittedly partisan (sometime rabidly partisan), but I can't imagine Chicago not being on the list.

Chicago is truly American in a way that cities near the coasts are not. Our coastal cities were the product of European exploration and settlement. Chicago, on the other hand, is a product of the USA and has been known as "the Great American city".

If the United States came of age in the 19th century, the city that stands out in how it grew and how it paralleled the expanding nation was Chicago, the fastest growing city on earth during this time.

The Metropolis of the Mid-Continent is iconically American.
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Old 01-06-2019, 09:36 AM
 
11,177 posts, read 22,388,331 times
Reputation: 10924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl AUS to USA View Post
1. Los Angeles (Hollywood, show biz, skating, surfing, cultural exports, West Coast, soft power, movies, music, marijuana culture, Hispanic Immigration, the beach, mountains)
2. NYC (Urban, NE USA, American Jews, money, melting pot, multiculturalism, tv shows, subway, density, ivy league)
3. Dallas/Fort Worth (Sunbelt, Hispanic immigration, suburban, religious, sprawl/automobiles, economic boom, growth, pick up trucks, obesity, highways, low taxes, affordability, guns)
4. Detroit (Midwest, snow, 4 seasons, economic decline, segregation, gun violence, rust belt, population decline, urban decay, race relations, automobiles, poverty, blue collar)
5. San Francisco (Tech, big business, Asian immigration, facebook, google, high salaries, high cost of living, highly educated, homeless people, angel investors, venture capital, entrepreneurs, apps, hiking, nature)
I feel like this overwhelming view on the city/metro, mostly from people who haven't been there, is why the city is such a breath of fresh air and surprise once you step foot on the ground.

The metro has gained back over 300,000 jobs since the recession, unemployment is at 3.8%, lower than Seattle, Los Angeles, Houston, etc. The number of unemployed people has been reduced from 375,000 to 80,000.

New light rail opening downtown, more residential development than has been seen in ages, new arena with a large entertainment district, tallest building in Michigan going up, central station renovation, lots of investment in parks, etc.

https://detroit.curbed.com/maps/deve...roit-transform
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Old 01-06-2019, 11:34 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl AUS to USA View Post
1. Los Angeles (Hollywood, show biz, skating, surfing, cultural exports, West Coast, soft power, movies, music, marijuana culture, Hispanic Immigration, the beach, mountains)
2. NYC (Urban, NE USA, American Jews, money, melting pot, multiculturalism, tv shows, subway, density, ivy league)
3. Dallas/Fort Worth (Sunbelt, Hispanic immigration, suburban, religious, sprawl/automobiles, economic boom, growth, pick up trucks, obesity, highways, low taxes, affordability, guns)
4. Detroit (Midwest, snow, 4 seasons, economic decline, segregation, gun violence, rust belt, population decline, urban decay, race relations, automobiles, poverty, blue collar)
5. San Francisco (Tech, big business, Asian immigration, facebook, google, high salaries, high cost of living, highly educated, homeless people, angel investors, venture capital, entrepreneurs, apps, hiking, nature)
Lotta stereotypes there, Carl! Denver and all of Colorado is more known for marijuana than LA! American Jews only in NY? Seriously? Half the Ivy League schools are in New England (4), two are in NY and one each are in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Obesity and pick-up trucks are in a lot more places than Dallas. Most of the US has a 4 season climate, pretty much every place north of Interstate 40 except for the west coast, segregation/race relations are an issue in other places than Detroit and I don't know if Detroit is even the empitome of it. Lots of homeless in every big city, even in Minneapolis/St. Paul where it's pretty cold in the winter.

How about:
In place of one of the California cities:
Denver - (Very outdoorsy-skiing, mountain climbing, mountain biking, kayaking, camping all within an hour or so of the city), Libertarians, mountains, beer-both Coors and craft beers, techy city.
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Old 01-06-2019, 08:22 PM
 
1,021 posts, read 1,238,241 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl AUS to USA View Post
1. Los Angeles (Hollywood, show biz, skating, surfing, cultural exports, West Coast, soft power, movies, music, marijuana culture, Hispanic Immigration, the beach, mountains)
2. NYC (Urban, NE USA, American Jews, money, melting pot, multiculturalism, tv shows, subway, density, ivy league)
3. Dallas/Fort Worth (Sunbelt, Hispanic immigration, suburban, religious, sprawl/automobiles, economic boom, growth, pick up trucks, obesity, highways, low taxes, affordability, guns)
4. Detroit (Midwest, snow, 4 seasons, economic decline, segregation, gun violence, rust belt, population decline, urban decay, race relations, automobiles, poverty, blue collar)
5. San Francisco (Tech, big business, Asian immigration, facebook, google, high salaries, high cost of living, highly educated, homeless people, angel investors, venture capital, entrepreneurs, apps, hiking, nature)
Wow, where to begin on this stereotype of cities on your list of cities that frankly I don't think for the most part are the best examples of American culture.

As was pointed out earlier, Detroit has come along way from your idea of what Detroit is today. When I first travelled there for work early in my career in the mid 2000's, Detroit was a mess. Less than 15 years later, downtown Detroit has turned itself around and is now a completely different city in feel, and look. If someone would have told me the the buildings I saw on the modest people mover were to be transformed from vacant hulks with trees growing through their roofs to renovated hotels and office buildings, I would have told you you were crazy. I have no idea why you think that Detroit represents the Midwest; while I really like the city and the progress and momentum that it has, Chicago is truly the best example of the Midwest with almost 10 million in a metro area that includes some of the best architecture and urban settings and most varied suburbs with over 200 plus towns representing some of the wealthiest and poorest suburbs in America.

Two cities in CA? Why? I think if you were to put two cities on the west coast, LA and Seattle would be the ones to add. SF has so many extremes that it is an outlier in America at this point. Your stereotypes of LA are too funny; growing up there there was no "marijuana culture" to speak of, and the movie business was really restricted to a small portion of the vast LA and OC area. I think of entertainment like Disneyland, Universal Studios and Knott's Berry Farm and endless subdivisions and freeways as more of an intregal part of the culture there than the glitz you have in your head.

Dallas obese? You make Dallas sound like some fat yokels all in pickup trucks. Dallas has it going on as a sunbelt engine, and might be a good example on this list because of that. NYC and ivy league? No, that would be Boston and New England. American Jews are found in most American cities, and cities like Baltimore with Pikesville are just as good of examples.

I know that your screen name indicates you are not from here, but your stereotypes are so bad that they are worth mentioning. My list would be:

NYC
Chicago
Dallas
Los Angeles
Seattle
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Old 01-07-2019, 02:57 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,256,276 times
Reputation: 1823
I mean, no metro in a US state is majority obese, but DFW has the highest rate of obesity of them, or second highest if you consider Nashville to be a major city. That said, Detroit, another city on Carl's list, has a very similar obesity rate and, to be honest, all major US cities have a large obesity rate; the lowest, San Francisco's, is over three times that of South Korea's.

Obesity Rates for States, Metro Areas
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