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Old 11-26-2018, 10:27 AM
 
1 posts, read 825 times
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Anyone know of any new growing cities or cities that have boomed within the past 10 years and as a result seem very new, updated, well planned, and clean?

For example, places like Reno NV in the 1990s - everyone was moving there and just about every business and building felt new and exciting, now days though most of the city is starting to have that depressing early 1999 aging look and feel. The schools are aging and so are the communities. It's just not an exciting place to live anymore. The same can be said for many smaller cities across the west and mid-west - most seem to have peaked..I'm looking for cities that are building shopping malls, not ones where they are going out of business (so to speak)..

The new and booming cities that I would like to live in like silicon valley or portland are grossly unaffordable.

I know most of the cities in Texas are booming and new, but Texas stays way to hot and I prefer seasons and light traffic.
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Old 11-26-2018, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the lower 48.
274 posts, read 235,355 times
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Huntsville, Alabama
Fayetteville, Arkansas
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Old 11-26-2018, 02:25 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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Raleigh, and Charlotte NC.
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Old 11-26-2018, 02:54 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Peachtree City, GA (founded 1959)
Seaside, FL (founded 1985)
The Woodlands, TX (founded 1974)
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Old 11-26-2018, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,519 posts, read 702,434 times
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It's funny that you mention Reno as your prime counterexample, because I just moved here a month ago, and to me, most of the city has that sleazy, '60s/'70s, neon, retro look - besides the genuinely old and nice Old Southwest neighborhood - but then you get outside the McCarran loop and immediately everything is super modern. The sort of sketchy but now-gentrifying areas just west and south of downtown also have a lot of new buildings and young people. I sure wasn't here in the '90s, though.

Word on the street is, SLC is the place to be (and surprisingly progressive/vegan-friendly/gay-friendly these days).
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Old 11-26-2018, 08:28 PM
 
3,542 posts, read 1,355,757 times
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"The new and booming cities that I would like to live in like silicon valley or portland are grossly unaffordable.
I know most of the cities in Texas are booming and new, but Texas stays way to hot and I prefer seasons and light traffic.'

1. light traffic ain't a-gonna be found in a boom-town.
2. hot is not nothing to be ashamed of with modern a/c.
3. seasons are just climate seasonings. add your own.
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Old 11-30-2018, 10:15 PM
 
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Definitely Irvine, California.

Not cheap though.
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Old 12-01-2018, 12:22 PM
 
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You may find that after a while every city that doesn't have much a mix of old and new, becomes kind of boring and lacks excitement or variety. Old cities being old, doesn't mean they're poorly planned or dirty. Most also have a decent amount of new development always going on. And they also provide lots of great urban character and classic architecture and history, that so many newer cities lack.
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Old 12-01-2018, 02:53 PM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Old cities being old, doesn't mean they're poorly planned or dirty.
Precisely...suburban sprawl is the exact opposite, whereas older cities tend to be laid out on a grid.
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Old 12-01-2018, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Little Rock, AR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuffaloHome View Post
Huntsville, Alabama
Fayetteville, Arkansas
This!
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