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Old 12-08-2018, 02:48 PM
 
4,478 posts, read 2,659,202 times
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It works very well. Even in a car-oriented city, a lot of people don't have cars. How many would like to pay less for housing by deleting the cost of a parking space they don't use? In any reasonably transit-served district it's probably a good bet for a developer to build no-parking or low-parking buildings on a moderate scale at least.

In quite a few cities it's already common of course.

I love what this does for the cityscape and density. Sites that might never be developed if parking is included (due to the potential for curb cuts, site geometries, adjacencies, etc.), or might at most be something small, can instead fit in large numbers of units. Many of those added units tilt toward lower prices at least by local standards...a huge benefit on a bunch of levels.
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Old 12-08-2018, 10:11 PM
 
1,819 posts, read 528,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
It works very well. Even in a car-oriented city, a lot of people don't have cars. How many would like to pay less for housing by deleting the cost of a parking space they don't use? In any reasonably transit-served district it's probably a good bet for a developer to build no-parking or low-parking buildings on a moderate scale at least.

In quite a few cities it's already common of course.

I love what this does for the cityscape and density. Sites that might never be developed if parking is included (due to the potential for curb cuts, site geometries, adjacencies, etc.), or might at most be something small, can instead fit in large numbers of units. Many of those added units tilt toward lower prices at least by local standards...a huge benefit on a bunch of levels.
I agree! It really makes the cityscape feel more urban (which I like).
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:30 AM
 
311 posts, read 218,253 times
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This form is typical of South Philadelphia, which has a population of 180,000 or so in under 10 sq mi.
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Old 12-09-2018, 06:23 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,219 posts, read 19,525,937 times
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This is an example in DC:

https://goo.gl/maps/2z9VLur8KFs
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