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Old 12-11-2018, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Alabama
38 posts, read 12,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
I agree with murksiderock that what restaurant chains a city has is no longer associated with its regional classification. They have all of those stores, except Piggly Wiggly, throughout Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina. Piggly Wiggly is only in North Carolina and areas further south though.
It's a few Piggly Wiggly stores in the midwest.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,651,021 times
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If you go by the soda name maps, NJ, NY and the eastern half of PA all belong with the NE. The DMV is where you see the striking change in colors, and is clearly the Mid-Atlantic. NC has enough mixed soda names that it could arguably be included with either the Mid-Atlantic or the Southern States.


Not that I think soda names is the best way to split up states, but it's interesting never the less.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:52 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,131 posts, read 9,903,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I think it's ridiculous to use Bojangles as an example of what's Southern. Bojangles is clearly geared towards the African American Community considering almost all of them are in PG county with none in Montgomery or Fairfax. If we're using food options which I admit is a bit entertaining, we can look at Pret A Manger as well as they only have locations in mostly what's considered the NE/Mid-Atlantic (New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Delaware, DC + Chicago) and there are 10 locations in DC alone or perhaps a place like La Colombe which are only found in the same locations as Pret A Manger + California and - Delaware.

With that said, is it plausible to say that the African American population in the DC area showcases "Southerness" more so then the other population groups? I don't see it within the White/Asian/Hispanic population at all.

I always enjoyed the Pop vs Coke vs Soda maps.

https://www.vox.com/a/explain-food-america

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/soda-vs-pop_n_2103764
Although it is just one category, I do like the soda - pop - coke maps. I especially like New York City apparently has something more in common with most of New England and the Northeast in general than Boston.

Regarding Virginia and especially North Carolina, are there any other states that so divided culturally within themselves as they on this map? They looks like a map of medieval Europe when Germany and Italy were divided into dozens of different smaller countries.
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Old 12-11-2018, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Alabama
38 posts, read 12,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Slang usage? Seriously? You think all "northeast" cities share a common slang?
"Yo"!
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Old 12-11-2018, 10:01 AM
 
29,905 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Although it is just one category, I do like the soda - pop - coke maps. I especially like New York City apparently has something more in common with most of New England and the Northeast in general than Boston.

Regarding Virginia and especially North Carolina, are there any other states that so divided culturally within themselves as they on this map? They looks like a map of medieval Europe when Germany and Italy were divided into dozens of different smaller countries.
SC isn't too far behind them and I can believe it. It wasn't until I first viewed this map several years ago that I discovered that some people refer to all soft drinks as coke. Growing up in rural SC (between Columbia and Charleston), I never heard of such; we call them sodas.
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Old 12-11-2018, 10:46 AM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,268,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
That is so interesting. These maps illustrate just how mixed Virginia is throughout its entirety. I have never heard any one call soda anything but Soda but it is interesting how some people also say pop in Virginia. I have heard people on TV using coke to describe all Soda but Virginia does not have many people who say that, as this map shows. Coke is more of a deep southern thing.

It would interesting to know what accounts for these differences. I am guessing that Coke is more popular further South because Coca-cola started in Georgia. Whereas Soda is the default for Eastern Locations outside of the Deep South. I am not sure about Pop though. It is popular across a huge portion of the United States.
here's another fun one that's all over the net.

https://bigthink.com/strange-maps/31...th-litmus-test
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Old 12-11-2018, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
110 posts, read 40,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
here's another fun one that's all over the net.

https://bigthink.com/strange-maps/31...th-litmus-test
Yes. I have seen this map before. I think sweet tea is available all over the country today. However, I do remember when it was hard to get Sweet Tea at certain restaurants in Richmond. My aunt from Charlotte has tried to order Sweet Tea at restaurants in Richmond many times and they always looked at her like she was crazy and said that they don't have sweet tea. This used to be true for most areas north of the James River. Unlike Richmond, Southern Virginia has always had very syrupy and traditional Sweet Tea.
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Old 12-11-2018, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,286 posts, read 3,505,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I think it's ridiculous to use Bojangles as an example of what's Southern. Bojangles is clearly geared towards the African American Community considering almost all of them are in PG county with none in Montgomery or Fairfax.

Perhaps in D.C., but not down here. The new one around the corner from us is patronized by a white and latino crowd. They have very broad appeal here, everyone seems to like them.
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Old 12-11-2018, 12:27 PM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,268,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Perhaps in D.C., but not down here. The new one around the corner from us is patronized by a white and latino crowd. They have very broad appeal here, everyone seems to like them.
Which could perhaps go back to the Mid-Atlantic vs South thing. Bojangles does not have a broad appeal here and situated mostly in predominantly African American areas with 0 in the two most populous counties surrounding DC. I assume the lack of blue collar Whites in the DC metro also plays a part. For sure fast food is more popular in the South & Midwest in general.


https://datafiniti.co/fast-food-restaurants-america/

Last edited by Ebck120; 12-11-2018 at 12:42 PM..
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Old 12-11-2018, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
110 posts, read 40,818 times
Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Which could perhaps go back to the Mid-Atlantic vs South thing. Bojangles does not have a broad appeal here and situated mostly in predominantly African American areas with 0 in the two most populous counties surrounding DC. I assume the lack of blue collar Whites in the DC metro also plays a part. For sure fast food is more popular in the South & Midwest in general.


https://datafiniti.co/fast-food-restaurants-america/
That is interesting. According to the website you provided, every southern state except Mississippi and Florida are in the top 20 for Fast Food Restaurants Per Capita.
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