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Old 12-13-2018, 01:52 PM
 
29,891 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
On a side note, all of Virginia and Marylands major cities are included in the Northeast Megaregion and in the Greater Washington Partnership. This is not a cultural division, but it definitely shows the relationship between those cities and their neighbor regions.
I wasn't aware that Richmond and Hampton Roads were part of the NEC. That most certainly is not a generally accepted consensus.

Virginia is generally accepted as a Southern state while its mid-Atlantic status is the one that tends to be somewhat questioned, not vice versa.
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
110 posts, read 40,722 times
Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I wasn't aware that Richmond and Hampton Roads were part of the NEC. That most certainly is not a generally accepted consensus.

Virginia is generally accepted as a Southern state while its mid-Atlantic status is the one that tends to be somewhat questioned, not vice versa.
Most people do not know, but both Richmond and Hampton Roads are apart of the Northeast Megaregion. It only makes since. Richmond and Washington are too close to each other for them not to have some sort of connection. The Greater Washington Partnership also includes Richmond in its focus region. Of Course, to most people, Richmond or Hampton Roads are not considered notable cities. I have talked to many people who have never heard of either place. They are both very overlooked and misunderstood. Especially Richmond.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megare..._United_States
Northeast - America 2050
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...l_Road_station
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...Street_Station
Northeast Corridor - The Fourth Regional Plan
Greater Washington Partnership – Fostering Unity Advancing Growth
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:28 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,728 posts, read 6,134,571 times
Reputation: 3585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
Most people do not know, but both Richmond and Hampton Roads are apart of the Northeast Megaregion. It only makes since. Richmond and Washington are too close to each other for them not to have some sort of connection. The Greater Washington Partnership also includes Richmond in its focus region. Of Course, to most people, Richmond or Hampton Roads are not considered notable cities. I have talked to many people who have never heard of either place. They are both very overlooked and misunderstood. Especially Richmond.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megare..._United_States
Northeast - America 2050
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...l_Road_station
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...Street_Station
Northeast Corridor - The Fourth Regional Plan
Greater Washington Partnership – Fostering Unity Advancing Growth
Why would Richmond endorse the greater WASHINGTON partnership? I asked the same of Baltimore as well since it appears to mainly benefit DC.
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:34 PM
 
1,702 posts, read 1,363,427 times
Reputation: 1743
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
Most people do not know, but both Richmond and Hampton Roads are apart of the Northeast Megaregion. It only makes since. Richmond and Washington are too close to each other for them not to have some sort of connection. The Greater Washington Partnership also includes Richmond in its focus region. Of Course, to most people, Richmond or Hampton Roads are not considered notable cities. I have talked to many people who have never heard of either place. They are both very overlooked and misunderstood. Especially Richmond.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megare..._United_States
Northeast - America 2050
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...l_Road_station
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...Street_Station
Northeast Corridor - The Fourth Regional Plan
Greater Washington Partnership – Fostering Unity Advancing Growth
I don't think Richmond is misunderstood -- I just don't get people constantly trying to conflate it with DC. They're very different cities imho and while there is the VA connection, Richmond isn't a place where government contractors are flocking or where lobbyists are looking to set up shop, I just don't get the constant comparisons. And that's not a hit on Richmond.
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
110 posts, read 40,722 times
Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
I don't think Richmond is misunderstood -- I just don't get people constantly trying to conflate it with DC. They're very different cities imho and while there is the VA connection, Richmond isn't a place where government contractors are flocking or where lobbyists are looking to set up shop, I just don't get the constant comparisons. And that's not a hit on Richmond.
Honestly, I don't think that Richmond and Washington have that much in common when it comes to culture. It is more of an economic connection. I think that Baltimore and Richmond are pretty similar in terms of culture though. In terms of architecture, Richmond and Washington are strikingly similar.
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Old 12-13-2018, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
561 posts, read 538,499 times
Reputation: 1061
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
I don't think Richmond is misunderstood -- I just don't get people constantly trying to conflate it with DC. They're very different cities imho and while there is the VA connection, Richmond isn't a place where government contractors are flocking or where lobbyists are looking to set up shop, I just don't get the constant comparisons. And that's not a hit on Richmond.
I would beg to differ, especially in terms of lobbyists (as that's the space I live in that space). Virginia's capital has always been a target for lobbyists and home to some very large global law outfits, all of which have big departments dedicated toward "consulting." Many a major entity or corporation with its major satellite office, regional headquarters or even headquarters in Northern VA, has lobbyists in Richmond via these firms for patently obvious reasons. And it's part of the reason my job takes me to the DC area at least twice weekly or on a week like this one, almost every day. Of course, Richmond is different from DC/NoVA at scale, but people make much more ado about the differences than they really are. The whole Eastern part of the state has been converging for at least two decades and it's impossible to look at the relationship the same as it was in the 90s.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
Honestly, I don't think that Richmond and Washington have that much in common when it comes to culture. It is more of an economic connection. I think that Baltimore and Richmond are pretty similar in terms of culture though. In terms of architecture, Richmond and Washington are strikingly similar.
While I do agree that apart from layout and architecture more similar to DC (or rather DC's architecture is more similar to Richmond's), Richmond is culturally more along the lines of Baltimore, there is still a real cultural tie between the three cities that has been discussed at length in another thread. People are mistaken if they believe DC doesn't have a base culture because once you identify it, it fits in well with the rest of the region. Now, this Greater Washington Partnership thing is a logical extension of the economic ties between the Chesapeake Bay cities. It; however, is a veiled device for major CEOs throughout the region to wield influence over local and state governments, and it has gotten push back from some corners. I wish they'd called it the Chesapeake Bay Regional Partnership or something along those lines. Impressions and buy-in matters.
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Old 12-13-2018, 05:05 PM
 
1,702 posts, read 1,363,427 times
Reputation: 1743
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquest1 View Post
I would beg to differ, especially in terms of lobbyists (as that's the space I live in that space). Virginia's capital has always been a target for lobbyists and home to some very large global law outfits, all of which have big departments dedicated toward "consulting." Many a major entity or corporation with its major satellite office, regional headquarters or even headquarters in Northern VA, has lobbyists in Richmond via these firms for patently obvious reasons. And it's part of the reason my job takes me to the DC area at least twice weekly or on a week like this one, almost every day. Of course, Richmond is different from DC/NoVA at scale, but people make much more ado about the differences than they really are. The whole Eastern part of the state has been converging for at least two decades and it's impossible to look at the relationship the same as it was in the 90s.
It's the state capital, of course there are lobbyists there but it's not part of the culture the way it is in DC. Same with consulting, government contracting, etc. I'm sure there are firms down there but it's not an integral part of the culture the way it is here. And that's not a bad thing, but to me, it's a stretch to say they're similar cities but that's jmo.

When I lived in Richmond, most of the people I knew worked in the medical field since that's the industry there (VCU Medical Center). The government contracting/consulting world is pretty small down there, maybe it's changed since I came back to NoVa though.
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Old 12-13-2018, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
561 posts, read 538,499 times
Reputation: 1061
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
It's the state capital, of course there are lobbyists there but it's not part of the culture the way it is in DC. Same with consulting, government contracting, etc. I'm sure there are firms down there but it's not an integral part of the culture the way it is here. And that's not a bad thing, but to me, it's a stretch to say they're similar cities but that's jmo.

When I lived in Richmond, most of the people I knew worked in the medical field since that's the industry there (VCU Medical Center). The government contracting/consulting world is pretty small down there, maybe it's changed since I came back to NoVa though.
Ehhh, Richmond's primary industries are legal, finance and government. I mean, yes medical, energy and cyber security, etc. are here, but the bread and butter is legal/finance. Richmond is the headquarters for several leading int'l law firms, pretty unusual for a city/market its size. The two most important firms would be McGuireWoods and Hunton Andrews Kurth (Hunton & Williams), which are both top 50 firms with large tentacles in the lobbying arena. That said, there are also a number of other smaller lobbying outfits and large nat'l and regional law firms headquarters in Richmond with consulting arms. If you were to pick apart what remains of the old school culture of Richmond, it would be rooted in these good ol' boy industries.
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Old 12-13-2018, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,209 posts, read 2,823,898 times
Reputation: 4497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I wasn't aware that Richmond and Hampton Roads were part of the NEC. That most certainly is not a generally accepted consensus.

Virginia is generally accepted as a Southern state while its mid-Atlantic status is the one that tends to be somewhat questioned, not vice versa.
You know as well as anyone else that sometimes it takes perception a minute to catch up to reality. While I partially agree with you, we're still within that "minute", more than anything...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
Most people do not know, but both Richmond and Hampton Roads are apart of the Northeast Megaregion. It only makes since. Richmond and Washington are too close to each other for them not to have some sort of connection. The Greater Washington Partnership also includes Richmond in its focus region. Of Course, to most people, Richmond or Hampton Roads are not considered notable cities. I have talked to many people who have never heard of either place. They are both very overlooked and misunderstood. Especially Richmond.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megare..._United_States
Northeast - America 2050
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...l_Road_station
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmo...Street_Station
Northeast Corridor - The Fourth Regional Plan
Greater Washington Partnership – Fostering Unity Advancing Growth
I wouldn't advocate Hampton Roads as part of the Northeast Corridor, though I would (and have) advocate for Richmond. Economically, politically, culturally, Hampton Roads is not quite dissociated from DC and Baltimore, but definitely disjointed. The opposite dynamic is at work when comparing Richmond to DC/Baltimore...

I think any sensible person, however, can admit some of yjr characteristic similarities that Hampton Roads shares with the entire region, as Hampton Roads is arguable the originator of a lot of the culture, overall. But because, as you mentioned, there is no major city within Virginia, very little is attributed to Virginia's credit...

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Why would Richmond endorse the greater WASHINGTON partnership? I asked the same of Baltimore as well since it appears to mainly benefit DC.
Just from a ground level speaking on Richmond locals, not from the political perspective: Richmonders embrace DC (and Maryland) for our kinship and similarities; there is no tit-for-tat, one upsmanship, envious relationship that Baltimoreans seem to prefer. All three areas are more alike than different; I think it's a wonderful thing that at least some political entities have begun to accept and embrace and attempt to unify the Baltimore-to-Richmond corridor...

Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
I don't think Richmond is misunderstood -- I just don't get people constantly trying to conflate it with DC. They're very different cities imho and while there is the VA connection, Richmond isn't a place where government contractors are flocking or where lobbyists are looking to set up shop, I just don't get the constant comparisons. And that's not a hit on Richmond.
No one in Richmond "conflates" it with DC, and you're intentionally misleading people by saying that's what anyone tries to do. All these years later, it's amazing and pitiful at the same time that you have this rigid image of Richmond that you refuse to shake and acknowledge what the city is today, and how most Washingtonians and Richmonders relate the two; this idea that nobody recognizes the kinship and commonalities between the two, an idea you've perpetuated for years, is not reflective of what people who know both cities would say...

Quote:
Originally Posted by aquest1 View Post
I would beg to differ, especially in terms of lobbyists (as that's the space I live in that space). Virginia's capital has always been a target for lobbyists and home to some very large global law outfits, all of which have big departments dedicated toward "consulting." Many a major entity or corporation with its major satellite office, regional headquarters or even headquarters in Northern VA, has lobbyists in Richmond via these firms for patently obvious reasons. And it's part of the reason my job takes me to the DC area at least twice weekly or on a week like this one, almost every day. Of course, Richmond is different from DC/NoVA at scale, but people make much more ado about the differences than they really are. The whole Eastern part of the state has been converging for at least two decades and it's impossible to look at the relationship the same as it was in the 90s.



While I do agree that apart from layout and architecture more similar to DC (or rather DC's architecture is more similar to Richmond's), Richmond is culturally more along the lines of Baltimore, there is still a real cultural tie between the three cities that has been discussed at length in another thread. People are mistaken if they believe DC doesn't have a base culture because once you identify it, it fits in well with the rest of the region. Now, this Greater Washington Partnership thing is a logical extension of the economic ties between the Chesapeake Bay cities. It; however, is a veiled device for major CEOs throughout the region to wield influence over local and state governments, and it has gotten push back from some corners. I wish they'd called it the Chesapeake Bay Regional Partnership or something along those lines. Impressions and buy-in matters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquest1 View Post
Ehhh, Richmond's primary industries are legal, finance and government. I mean, yes medical, energy and cyber security, etc. are here, but the bread and butter is legal/finance. Richmond is the headquarters for several leading int'l law firms, pretty unusual for a city/market its size. The two most important firms would be McGuireWoods and Hunton Andrews Kurth (Hunton & Williams), which are both top 50 firms with large tentacles in the lobbying arena. That said, there are also a number of other smaller lobbying outfits and large nat'l and regional law firms headquarters in Richmond with consulting arms. If you were to pick apart what remains of the old school culture of Richmond, it would be rooted in these good ol' boy industries.
Nova Guy is clueless, it really is beating a dead horse with that one, regardless of what examples you can present. There's always the same rebuttal...
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Old 12-14-2018, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Alabama
38 posts, read 12,017 times
Reputation: 73
I believe Virginia and North Carolina are economically thriving just like the other Mid-Atlantic/Northeastern states with wealthy, diverse, and highly educated populations.

Can people please stop calling N.C. and Virginia “Mid-Atlantic” states?-maxresdefault.jpg
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