U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-06-2018, 09:56 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 2,262,328 times
Reputation: 1820

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Usrname View Post
I'm talking about mean price statewide and regionwide.
There's drastic East-West price gap.
And for the same price, I can get a house on than 25 times larger parcel in Eastern states, in the Northeast (New England), Midwest, or the South (and better quality house at the same time). Not focusing on few very expensive spots like SF or NYC, these are special cases.

Of course there'll be expensive cities everywhere, even in 3rd world countries. I live in CA, had lived in most major US cities including NYC and various rural areas, a few states, both West and East, mostly West.
At the end of the day it's purely supply and demand. Demand is higher in the West then supply can, well supply. Theres geographical constraints that play a part but its minute since anyone can choose to move to another location. The West especially with Tech being such a generator of high paying jobs and innovation plus gifted geographical beauty and weather makes it very desirable and attracts alot of capable folks which also attracts alot of hopefuls and dreamers I've lived in every region in the country and can understand the draw.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-06-2018, 10:01 PM
 
367 posts, read 268,965 times
Reputation: 425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
At the end of the day it's purely supply and demand. Demand is higher in the West then supply can, well supply. Theres geographical constraints that play a part but its minute since anyone can choose to move to another location. The West especially with Tech being such a generator of high paying jobs and innovation plus gifted geographical beauty and weather makes it very desirable.
So, back to the question of demand - the reason for this recent high demand.
Tech definitely is a part of it, aside from situation in big cities, where tech has obvious impact on housing , tech employees buy 2nd homes out in scenic areas, driving the prices up.
I can see it directly impacting CA, WA, even OR prices. I guess another factor is retirees with money/such as cashed out in CA, migrating from CA to other, cheaper, Western states, pushing the prices up...
Seems like tech industry is the main driving force?
I mean people didn't just start to love Western scenery out of the blue to the point of mass migration from the East, after the last recession.
Then, there's Airbnb in scenic parts and all the "investors" who run them.

But I think there's Tulip mania in place. Homes in crappy places get cash offers over asking here, after a day on the market.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2018, 10:03 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 2,262,328 times
Reputation: 1820
Quote:
Originally Posted by Usrname View Post
So, back to the question of demand - the reason for this recent high demand.
Tech definitely is a part of it, aside from situation in big cities, where tech has obvious impact on housing , tech employees buy 2nd homes out in scenic areas, driving the prices up.
I can see it directly impacting CA, WA, even OR prices. I guess another factor is retirees with money/such as cashed out in CA, migrating from CA to other Western states, pushing the prices up...
Seems like tech industry is the main driving force?
Then, there's Airbnb in scenic parts and all the "investors" who run them.
I think Tech plays a huge part.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2018, 10:22 PM
 
367 posts, read 268,965 times
Reputation: 425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I think Tech plays a huge part.
I think so too.
I do think there's real Dutch Tulip craze going as well....I watched some very modest (to put it mildly) homes in small middle-of-nowhere mountain town go up 7 times since recession ended, a lot of stuff like that had happened since 2012...insanity. Bringing Tesla to very depressed Reno, NV had produced a housing tsunami within 60 mile radius, for example. But will things last... who knows.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2018, 10:34 PM
 
367 posts, read 268,965 times
Reputation: 425
Forgot to mention weed money...growers had been another real estate force in some of the Western states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2018, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Between amicable and ornery
1,097 posts, read 1,450,486 times
Reputation: 1468
I grew up on the west coast and got to spend some time on the east coast and with my limited experience, the west is best. People have been moving out west for centuries. Along with that move is the hope of new opportunities. The midwest is nicknamed flyover country for a reason. I think the east coast's harsh weather is a deciding factor for people from the northeast. The south's perception is borderline pathetic in that southerners lean on the confederate flag and still haven't dealt with losing the civil war and their political processes reflect that. The west is diverse and tolerant of others. Kind of like major crowded cities; everyone complains but still want to be there.

My spouse is from NC and I wanted to move over there for the experience. He didn't want to move back. A good read is https://www.amazon.com/American-Nati...ional+cultures
It deals with historical migration patterns. The job creators are on the coasts which is probably the most relevant reason for people to move out west.

Last edited by MAXIALE02; 12-07-2018 at 12:00 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2018, 07:28 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,544 posts, read 3,650,165 times
Reputation: 12301
$100k is not realistic. They aren't manufacturing new land and much of what exists is already owned. Accessible land with the hope of being usable will cost. Add to that the availability of water and then other utilities. It would cost $90k to bring city water to my half acre and a well would run about $10k if we found water easily --- more if we had to search. We could haul water -- some do. Then there's septic systems $$$. To build you might need engineered dirt if in a sandy area for stability. Then you get to build your house. The cost of wood for stick-built is amazingly high. Maybe you could add utilities and septic to park a mobile home on it if allowed. Then build when you could scrape the money together.

The cost of me being a pioneer in my half acre was going to probably exceed $350k. Screw that. I found a house on 1+ acre for a lot less when house prices were depressed but $100k still won't cut it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2018, 10:35 AM
 
367 posts, read 268,965 times
Reputation: 425
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
$100k is not realistic. They aren't manufacturing new land and much of what exists is already owned. Accessible land with the hope of being usable will cost. Add to that the availability of water and then other utilities. It would cost $90k to bring city water to my half acre and a well would run about $10k if we found water easily --- more if we had to search. We could haul water -- some do. Then there's septic systems $$$. To build you might need engineered dirt if in a sandy area for stability. Then you get to build your house. The cost of wood for stick-built is amazingly high. Maybe you could add utilities and septic to park a mobile home on it if allowed. Then build when you could scrape the money together.

The cost of me being a pioneer in my half acre was going to probably exceed $350k. Screw that. I found a house on 1+ acre for a lot less when house prices were depressed but $100k still won't cut it.
You mean the Western states, I assume...out East plenty of nice opportunities for < 100K.
Regarding new land not being manufactured: ironically, out West, there's a lot more undeveloped, unused land (and I don't include protected one), than in the East....People would move West for "open spaces" and "wilderness", frontier-ishness but end up in very high population density.

On real estate site, I've seen a beat up RV on 0.5 acre in the middle of the barren desert in AZ, being sold as "single family home" for 84K....LOL. The stream of fools doesn't dry out, I guess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2018, 10:46 AM
 
367 posts, read 268,965 times
Reputation: 425
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAXIALE02 View Post
I grew up on the west coast and got to spend some time on the east coast and with my limited experience, the west is best. People have been moving out west for centuries. Along with that move is the hope of new opportunities. The midwest is nicknamed flyover country for a reason. I think the east coast's harsh weather is a deciding factor for people from the northeast. The south's perception is borderline pathetic in that southerners lean on the confederate flag and still haven't dealt with losing the civil war and their political processes reflect that. The west is diverse and tolerant of others. Kind of like major crowded cities; everyone complains but still want to be there.

My spouse is from NC and I wanted to move over there for the experience. He didn't want to move back. A good read is https://www.amazon.com/American-Nati...ional+cultures
It deals with historical migration patterns. The job creators are on the coasts which is probably the most relevant reason for people to move out west.
Thanks for the book recommendation, sounds like a good read.
I think the current migration pattern should be East, not West, because of non-sense prices in the West...
I had lived in the East too, in different places from North to Deep South...harsh weather in the East: not sure... most of the West got plenty of harsh weather in my book. Horrible heat in the Southern parts of the West, very miserable, rainy/overcast PNW climate, and plenty of cold/snowy winters in other places (I'd lived all over the West)...
Regarding big cities...most assuredly, not everyone lives or ever wants to be in them.
"The west is diverse and tolerant of others"... don't know about that either...rural West mentality is very different from big cities (most of it votes republican) neither you'll see any "diversity" in most of it, while East got live-and-let-live regions like New England, for example. Also, I thought that Northern Midwest was pretty let-live kind of place....and Great Lakes rural regions of Midwest...no a flyover country by any means, very beautiful places.

Last edited by Usrname; 12-07-2018 at 11:22 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
9,013 posts, read 2,726,253 times
Reputation: 6945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Usrname View Post
Most of the the homes in the West aren't going to be right near outstanding scenery....but quite a drive away, often in traffic. Mass attraction to mountains...why now?
All that is necessary is to be able to look at them.

If you think about it, there really aren't any major cities in the West that don't have a mountain backdrop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top