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Old 12-12-2018, 05:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droc31 View Post
Buffalo/Rochester I've always thought of as an interesting case especially since the two cities are only 75 miles apart. Route 98 would tend to be the natural fault line between the two regions, and I believe Wyoming, Orleans, and Genesee Counties can get media from both cities. Having lived in both regions, I've always thought that Orleans County skewed more toward Rochester, while Genesee County leaned more toward Buffalo (especially Pembroke, Darien Lake, Batavia) When I was younger, I always found it surprising for Buffalo's local news to cover stories in places in eastern Genesee County like Bergen and LeRoy when I lived due north of those towns in Western Monroe County and couldn't get 2,4, and 7.
Here is an interesting illustration related to this. This kid is in a town in the Rochester metro area, but the schools they play are primarily in the Buffalo area or “section”. This is the Buffalo CBS affiliate, by the way: https://www.wivb.com/news/local-news...all/1042814246
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:00 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,219 posts, read 17,954,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Youngstown seems to be pretty evenly split. Those who live to the north and west gravitate to Cleveland, and those who live to the south and east gravitate to Pittsburgh. One subtle advantage to Youngstown is that whether you go to Pittsburgh or Cleveland, you're very close to important employment centers and upscale shopping in both. Pittsburgh's northern suburbs and Cleveland's eastern suburbs have a lot of money and jobs. With that said, Youngstown does focus more on Pittsburgh than anywhere else in northeast Ohio.
I mistyped the highlighted sentence. What I meant to say was that Youngstown focuses more on Pittsburgh than any other city in northeast Ohio does, not necessarily that Youngstown focuses more on Pittsburgh than it does on any other city in Northeast Ohio. As my lengthy post illustrated, Youngstown seems to split its attention pretty evenly between Pittsburgh and Cleveland.
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Old 12-13-2018, 09:14 PM
 
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I've never lived in a suburb unless you consider Jersey City a suburb. Technically yes, but whatever lol. But I know people who have been in this situation.

Central Southeastern PA is a very weird location. I know people in York. Its region includes Lancaster and Harrisburg. Technically, Harrisburg would be the more major city between the three. But a lot of people from York go to Lancaster for many activities. On top of that, the three function pretty well together as lesser cities to Philly and Baltimore, and even DC to some extent. They kinda create their own MSA/CSA that is strangely very connected to others, rather than having its own identity/culture/economy. You'll see plenty of people that cheer for the Ravens or Orioles, and meet just as many who all support Philly teams. Sometimes you'll even see cars with Orioles stickers right next to Eagles stickers. People from the area will often go to Baltimore for a night out on the fly, but Philly and DC are possible with just a bit of planning. They'll head to DC for the more cultural stuff and shopping, Philly for the bigger events and sports games, and Baltimore for the quick restaurant/bar hop. It's a really weird situation going on there.

Also never lived in Frankfort, KY, but it's between Louisville and Lexington. It's geographically closer to Lexington. As the seat of government for Kentucky, most state agencies are there. The offices there are split pretty 50/50 between those commuting from Louisville MSA and Lexington MSA. But the people that live there are for more affiliated with Lexington in every way possible.

Someone summed up Philly/NYC very well. From my observations, those who live between the two generally come to NYC for the more cultural, big events and shopping. But for a more casual night out in the city with friends and family, Philly is more accessible and sometimes closer. People in the Poconos that commute to NYC for work are in some weird zone that really is not part of either MSA. Many people there commute to NYC, but would have more of a Philly personality/accent and be more affiliated with Philly sports. And they'd often go to both equally for all purposes.

Huntington, WV has some strange strong connection with Columbus, OH in my experience. It's connected somewhat with Cincinnati of course too though.
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Old 12-13-2018, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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In Seattle, there is Vancouver 2 hours North, and Portland 2 hours south. Then San Francisco which is a longer drive or short flight (and is very common and smooth to get between the two).
Vancouver offers a fun, cultural experience. It has a heavy international presence, great clubs, scenery, and food. Fun weekend getaway.

Portland is more laid back and down to earth. I have some friends who live there, and we'll just wander around the city. It feels more homey and the population seems genuinely happy. it has great parks and is close proximity to the Oregon coast, so definitely a great stopping point for that.

San Francisco is a farther drive, but it's so enjoyable and beautiful. It gives you an opportunity to see the great Pacific Northwest and the fun small cities/ nature all along the I-5 or 101 corridor.
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Old 12-24-2018, 07:54 AM
 
2,770 posts, read 5,357,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
I've never lived in a suburb unless you consider Jersey City a suburb. Technically yes, but whatever lol.
JC would be more considered a satellite city, but yes the overall idea is similar.
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Old 12-24-2018, 07:22 PM
 
3,596 posts, read 1,523,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
Polk County (which includes Lakeland, Winter Haven, and numerous other places) is virtually guaranteed to be a major long term growth center for Florida. The topography in many sections is rather hilly by Florida standards, with scores of natural lakes both large and small, and this inland area doesn't have the same level of storm surge and flooding threats as the coast. Western Polk around Lakeland seems more connected to Tampa, and eastern Polk, particularly Haines City and Davenport, to Orlando.
Great assessment. I agree on all points!
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Old 12-24-2018, 10:53 PM
 
384 posts, read 123,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Here is an interesting illustration related to this. This kid is in a town in the Rochester metro area, but the schools they play are primarily in the Buffalo area or “section”. This is the Buffalo CBS affiliate, by the way: https://www.wivb.com/news/local-news...all/1042814246

It's strange because Medina and Albion both play in Section VI (which covers greater Buffalo). Which means Albion plays schools like Wilson (Wilson in Niagara County not Wilson Magnet in Rochester), Iroquois, and Starpoint, (all >30 miles distance from Albion), yet doesn't compete against Holley, which is 7 miles east on Route 31. Albion and Holley districts actually border each other near the old Camp Fancher and Hickory Ridge Golf Course.
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Old 12-25-2018, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,609 posts, read 1,107,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Agreed. The residential/commercial growth between Dayton and Cincinnati is so prevalent that the two cities may soon become one CSA, and possibly, later on, one MSA. The stretch of I-75 from Warsaw, KY to Tipp City, OH is often referred to as CIN-DAY. This tie-in between the two cities is easily visible in recent nighttime satellite photographs, such as the 2012 pix below:

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/f...635d38a1_o.jpg
Why do people keep saying this? OMB just re-drew MSA/CSA boundaries and no changes were made to Cincinnati or Dayton to link them together. So where is the evidence that they "may soon be" one MSA?
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Old 12-25-2018, 01:14 AM
 
Location: Western Asia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Count David View Post
I grew up in the Inland Empire of CA. If we had to leave the area to do something (event, beach, etc), it was most likely to Orange County (25 miles). Los Angeles is 50 miles away (through Orange County in many cases), and that is much more of a "day trip" than OC is, and would most likely be to do something that can't be done in OC (LA is generally viewed as being "gross" by many IE residents as well, and the vast majority would be living in OC if they could ). San Diego serves almost no purpose beyond Tijuana, Sea World, or the zoo, and I myself had probably gone there only 5 or so times in life in 20 years prior to moving away (and I myself still have little use for it, to be honest ).


I lived in Ridgecrest, CA, a town of 25K in the Mojave Desert. The relationship with other cities was unique IMO. For shopping that wasn't in Ridgecrest (anything beyond Wal-Mart/K-Mart honestly), one has the choice of traveling to Lancaster (86 miles) or Bakersfield (103 miles). Lancaster is the quicker/safer trip, but is generally viewed to be less glamorous overall (if you're viewed as less glamorous than Bakersfield, you've got problems ). Bakersfield is in the same county as Ridgecrest, and serves some public-type use as well (whereas Lancaster isn't). Ironically, Ridgecrest gets Los Angeles TV stations, but Bakersfield's newspaper (Bakersfield has its own TV stations that Ridgecrest doesn't get).

Alternatively, Ridgecrest residents could go to Victorville for shopping (88 miles), but people from Ridgecrest absolutely AVOID doing so because US 395 between the two cities has claimed many lives, so people avoid it altogether for that reason.

Ironically (IMO), Ridgecresters have nearly no use for Los Angeles (156 miles), but have this strange fascination with San Diego (225 miles). All the kids want to move to San Diego after high school, and it's where many of the adults want to spend the weekend. LA may as well not even be there to them, which I always found strange.
I experienced something a bit similar I think on a smaller scale. I grew up 45 minutes from Baton Rouge and 1 hour from New Orleans which was significantly larger. We went to Baton Rouge all the time and rarely went to New Orleans because of the crime, more expensive, more traffic concerns, etc.


New Orleans is popular with people right around it and tourists from around the nation and Baton Rouge is popular through out the state except New Orleans....it was like New Orleans was just its own thing.
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Old 12-25-2018, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,609 posts, read 1,107,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Interesting question. I don't have experience living between cities like this, although when I lived in the DMV I had friends who were about halfway between Baltimore and Washington but seemed to orient very clearly around DC.



Just thought i'd add a few more pairs that you might agree with. They're all over a million MSA (OK Tulsa should be cracking that any day now) and it's 2 hrs or less from city center to city center.

San Antonio, Austin
Buffalo, Rochester
Birmingham, Atlanta
Indy-Cincy-Louisville (any combination of two or maybe somewhere between all three!)
Tulsa, OKC
Phoenix, Tucson
I used to live in Stillwater, OK. While the city is economically tied to OKC, and is part of OKC's CSA, OSU has a much stronger connection with Tulsa.

Because of OSU-Tulsa, there's a frequent bus that takes you between Tulsa and Stillwater, whereas getting to OKC required a car or a very expensive shuttle/taxi.

I also think a disproportionate share of OKC residents go to OU, while Tulsa/Green Country sends more to OSU.

In terms of distance, Stillwater is closer to OKC.
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