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Old 12-14-2018, 04:08 PM
 
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Affordable meaning overall cost of living at or below the national average. It seems like just about every 'affordable' US city resembles Wichita far more than NYC. The closest thing to a city that is both "urban" and afford is Cleveland, Oh and St Louis, Mo. And perhaps Detroit.
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Old 12-14-2018, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taggerung View Post
Affordable meaning overall cost of living at or below the national average. It seems like just about every 'affordable' US city resembles Wichita far more than NYC. The closest thing to a city that is both "urban" and afford is Cleveland, Oh and St Louis, Mo. And perhaps Detroit.
The Chicago Metro Area is not too expensive.

https://censusreporter.org/profiles/...wi-metro-area/
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Old 12-14-2018, 05:39 PM
 
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Pretty much anything "Rust Belt" or Interior Northeastern/Midwestern would fit.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:57 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Pretty much anything "Rust Belt" or Interior Northeastern/Midwestern would fit.
Including Pittsburgh.
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Old 12-14-2018, 09:57 PM
 
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Most of those places aren't that urban aside from Chicago. Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, etc., do have some fairly dense tracts but we're not talking top-order urbanity.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:06 PM
 
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Chicago and Philly are easily the top two most affordable urban cities.

Below that tier of urbanity comes Baltimore and Pittsburgh.

Then Harrisburgh PA and Richmond VA.

Then Cincinnati, Kansas City, and Milwaukee.

That's at least my order/groups. Anyone can feel free to disagree.
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Old 12-15-2018, 07:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Chicago and Philly are easily the top two most affordable urban cities.
It depends upon your definition of urban. If extending that descriptive to just a handful of cities, then yes they are based on relativity. For the more broader definition which includes many more options, they're no where close with one bedroom apartments averaging $1500 or more per month. Cities like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Louisville, St Louis, Kansas City, Milwaukee and Buffalo allow for urban downtown living under $1000 a month, and some well under that amount.
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Old 12-15-2018, 07:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
It depends upon your definition of urban. If extending that descriptive to just a handful of cities, then yes they are based on relativity. For the more broader definition which includes many more options, they're no where close with one bedroom apartments averaging $1500 or more per month. Cities like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Louisville, St Louis, Kansas City, Milwaukee and Buffalo allow for urban downtown living under $1000 a month, and some well under that amount.
This and they have other urban districts within the city as well.
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Old 12-15-2018, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Brookline
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
It depends upon your definition of urban. If extending that descriptive to just a handful of cities, then yes they are based on relativity. For the more broader definition which includes many more options, they're no where close with one bedroom apartments averaging $1500 or more per month. Cities like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Louisville, St Louis, Kansas City, Milwaukee and Buffalo allow for urban downtown living under $1000 a month, and some well under that amount.
I guess it depends on the definition of downtown. In Pittsburgh that means the Central Business District, and in that case the average rent is $1,351 a month for a one bedroom. The average rent in the city is $1,159 a month for a one bedroom. You can of course get apartments for much cheaper but they will be small, dated, and not in a very urban area of the city. Pittsburgh rentals are as varied as its neighborhoods so averages make it difficult to really understand what you are going to pay. All of this is made even more confusing by how the numbers are crunched in regards to do they mean within city limits or metro when they say Pittsburgh (and probably every city).
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Old 12-15-2018, 09:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
It depends upon your definition of urban. If extending that descriptive to just a handful of cities, then yes they are based on relativity. For the more broader definition which includes many more options, they're no where close with one bedroom apartments averaging $1500 or more per month. Cities like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Louisville, St Louis, Kansas City, Milwaukee and Buffalo allow for urban downtown living under $1000 a month, and some well under that amount.
Chicago and Philadelphia are two of a handful of American cities where a car is not required, and often a burden depending on the neighborhood you live in. Living without a car in Cleveland, Indy, Cincinnati, Louisville, STL, KCMO, and Milwaukee would be a poor quality of life IMO. You'd be stuck to your inner urban neighborhood, never able to easily experience anything away from downtown. I lived in Louisville. Downtown has some cool bars and restaurants, but there are not many nice places to live downtown yet, there are still major job centers in the outer neighborhoods and suburbs, the grocery shopping options in downtown are VERY limited, and the only good shopping is in the out neighborhoods of the city.

Pittsburgh is the only city you listed that I could see it being possible to live in without a car. Still not with the ease of Chicago or Philly though.
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