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Old 12-22-2018, 07:36 AM
 
56,758 posts, read 81,102,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
And work where?? Most of those areas have nothing but WalMart and a couple of fast food chain restaurants for job opportunities.
That is for the OP to find, but I’m just answering the general question asked...

In terms of NOVA_guy’s post, I can vouch for Holmes County MS, as that is where my father is from originally. I have been there before and it unfortunately fits economically.
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Old 12-22-2018, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,661 posts, read 9,639,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrovich View Post
I am making a list of "poorest of the poor" areas in US i don't mean a trailer park or ghetto neighborhood in large metro area.


I mean the whole county or large part of the state that lives below poverty level like worst of the worst economic conditions where 80% of total residents are poor.


1. It should be somewhat dense not a total cabin in the woods or tiny town.
2. Reason for economic hardship should not be use of hard drugs.


Please don't guess or use some articles from internet, do you have personal experience?


P.S. I am asking because i want to move there.
Why would you want to move to the poorest area?
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Old 12-22-2018, 09:17 AM
 
5,471 posts, read 2,856,170 times
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Some Indian reservations have meth and other “hard drug” infestations. Others have high rates of alcoholism, or of both drinking AND drugging.

Weird query. Wonder if the poster plans to freeload in a setting where he or she blends in. Even in such places, individuals do stand out, so there is no easy freeloading.
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Old 12-22-2018, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,108 posts, read 23,994,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
Well the Census Bureau released some new data recently about the wealthiest and poorest counties in the country -- the poorest: McCreary County, Ky.; Holmes County, Miss.; Sumter County, Ala.; Bell County, Ky.; and Harlan County, Ky.,

Good luck.
Eastern Kentucky doesn't look good on that poverty rate map.
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Old 12-22-2018, 10:59 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
822 posts, read 1,256,504 times
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For that 80% poverty rate, you probably would have to look at individual census tracts. Looking around on other sites, I did not see many places themselves with that high of a rate.

In Pennsylvania, Reading has the distinction of the highest poverty rate of a city over 50,000 at 41%. Nearby cities of York and Lancaster also have above average poverty rates. At least these cities more favorable employment opportunities nearby than rural eastern Kentucky or the Mississippi Delta.
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Old 12-22-2018, 02:12 PM
 
795 posts, read 1,056,470 times
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I'd look at the Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan.

Also, please be specific areas about what areas of Detroit you talking about because - yes - in some areas, Detroit is very poor, but in some areas "luxury apartments" are really a thing and people want to live in them and be part of the action in Detroit. So, you can't just say Detroit and leave that as the only and final word on the topic.

It's not like 10 years ago when people couldn't move out of there fast enough. If you've been to Detroit previously, but not within the past 3-5 years, then you really have no idea how much the city has changed in just a short amount of time. It is really night and day different.

https://www.realtor.com/apartments/Detroit_MI/luxury

/end rant

/sorry
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Old 12-22-2018, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,748,924 times
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NY is weird, and things like poverty maps do not tell the whole story.

NY is one of the states where the wealth disparity is at its most visually obvious. The obscenely wealthy live very near the most poor, leading to a very blended up map of income averages.

One road will be all run down farm houses, old trailers and abandoned cars, the very next will have three McMansions and an old well kept Victorian home on it.

That said, some towns around here in the southern tier are pulled straight out of central Appalachia. They are just less visible statistically.
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Old 12-22-2018, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,108 posts, read 23,994,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
I'd look at the Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan.

Also, please be specific areas about what areas of Detroit you talking about because - yes - in some areas, Detroit is very poor, but in some areas "luxury apartments" are really a thing and people want to live in them and be part of the action in Detroit. So, you can't just say Detroit and leave that as the only and final word on the topic.

It's not like 10 years ago when people couldn't move out of there fast enough. If you've been to Detroit previously, but not within the past 3-5 years, then you really have no idea how much the city has changed in just a short amount of time. It is really night and day different.

https://www.realtor.com/apartments/Detroit_MI/luxury

/end rant

/sorry
I love those house for rent listings where there's no house.

We can just say Detroit if we want to. I've never been to Detroit, but I know there are nice areas with lovely homes. There are also areas that I wouldn't want to drive through. I don't have any personal knowledge, so I wouldn't dare recommend anything to anyone.
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Old 12-22-2018, 04:12 PM
 
21,220 posts, read 30,443,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
That is for the OP to find, but Im just answering the general question asked...

In terms of NOVA_guys post, I can vouch for Holmes County MS, as that is where my father is from originally. I have been there before and it unfortunately fits economically.
I get why you were answering but thought it would be good to have the OP reconsider their methodology as finding the poorest areas to live in doesn't account for how one is supposed to survive there. The Rust Belt at the very least has the economic infrastructure in place for employment options that pay a decent enough wage versus some of these places in the South which have never had anything and where getting by only exists largely through federal assistance.
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Old 12-22-2018, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,241 posts, read 24,463,501 times
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This is going to be hard to answer from personal experience.

I grew up here, pop 12K:
Home Gardens, CA
^But it's a barrio in a large urban area. Most residents have been there forever, or are fairly recent immigrants. Day laborers line the main drag every morning, and most businesses along it cater to the Latino population. 90% of kids at the local school are poor and Latino (and free lunch), and about 1/2 of them speak exclusively in Spanish at home. Crime is high, there are gangs, graffiti, bars on the windows, wrought iron fences, beer cans and bottles everywhere, loud music, gunshots, strange characters, etc. As horrible as it sounds, it wasn't that bad of a place to grow up, though I do wish I had grown up in a better place.

There are other neighborhoods like it strewn across the Inland Empire.

I've lived here: pop 29K:
Ridgecrest, CA
This place is nice on the surface, but there is a HUGE underclass of just plain poor/up to no good people. People that grew up too fast, drink too much, have kids spread all over town, go to jail often, don't work, get involved in drugs (whether they do them or not). (If you want to read more)

The surrounding area is pretty good for poverty too (Trona, Inyokern, California City, Mojave, Lake Isabella, etc).

This one has large swaths of poverty (probably the kind you're looking for, to be honest). It's a city though.
Spokane, WA

There are towns in New York (Kaser, Kiryas Joel, New Square) that are populated by Hasidic Jews, and are very poor statistically.

Native American Reservations too: Pine Ridge (SD), Navajo (AZ), Rosebud (SD). NOTE: The poorest county in the United States is Todd County, SD, and it only has a poverty rate of 52%.

Poor urban/suburban cities like: Hamtramck, MI; Highland Park, MI; Opa-Locka, FL; East St. Louis, IL; Centreville, IL, Pontiac, MI

Poor farming towns like: Mendota, CA; Earlimart, CA; Cutler, CA; Orange Cove, CA; any Colonia in South Texas

Or others: Yazoo City, MS; Benton Harbor, MI

Or this area: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Belt_(U.S._region)

Or the usual suspects:
-Bronx County, NY (The Bronx)
-Hidalgo County, TX (Edinburg-McAllen)
-Detroit, MI
-Cameron County, TX (Brownsville)
-Cleveland, OH
-Webb County, TX (Laredo)
-Buffalo, NY
-San Bernardino, CA
-Rochester, NY
-Syracuse, NY
-Dayton, OH
-Hartford, CT
-Flint, MI
-Albany, GA
-Reading, PA
-Merced, CA
-Gary, IN
-Camden, NJ
-Bulloch County, GA (Statesboro)
-Canton, OH
-Youngstown, OH

and so on.
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