U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-01-2019, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
368 posts, read 399,153 times
Reputation: 461

Advertisements

Despite being a hop, skip, and a jump from Houston, the Beaumont-Port Arthur area has not benefited from the growth going on in the big Texas cities.

It's basically like the rust belt of East Texas. And to think that is where oil was first discovered in Texas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-02-2019, 09:11 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,719,667 times
Reputation: 3788
PA is not all Rust Belt, but there are major inconsistencies. It's a hard state to characterize based on the interstate drive-through, where stupid 1950's-60's decisions continue to haunt the road network. (The entire community of Breezewood is oft cited here. )

Generally, the areas south and east of Blue Mountain (i.e. along the I-81/78 corridors, and south and east; greater Philadelphia, and the Northeast Corridor penumbra) are growing economically. The hyper-division of PA local governments with small city limits does reveal some municipalities in this area, such as the City of Reading, pointing out as Flint-level distressed. These are localized inconsistencies in a growing region.

Past Blue Mountain (which may need to move slightly to embrace Monroe County, the more intensely developed/redeveloped "Pocono" area), decline is more uniform other than in core Pittsburgh, and around State College. PA's population center keeps moving east, and ever so slightly north. Some more rural areas beyond Blue Mountain are holding their own better than others. The old coal towns east and west continue to empty out, though some in the east see some cost of living migration (Hazleton, the odd place where industrial parks actually fill up, is now full of new immigrants instead of children of old). Scranton/Wilkes-Barre sees some new building as churning, the combined urban area population is still falling. A few isolated rural areas see stable farms and gas fracking, or as the base of an isolated growing enterprise (Sheetz employs many more Altoonans than the railroad now). In some areas, the promise of gas has fizzled and dairy farming has crashed, so there's even the possibility of new rust.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2019, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,933,106 times
Reputation: 10542
Breaking it down more, there are fundamentally three different kind of built landscapes in the U.S. Every region is a patchwork of these three.

Well-kept historic areas: Basically anywhere which was a built up area prior to World War II, from big-city residential neighborhoods to small towns. While there is scattered infill from more recent times, the overall feel of these areas is finely-grained and "historic." This is neither strongly associated with the Rust Belt or the Sun Belt, since it's more of a Northeastern typology, but it's a bit more common in gentrified Rust Belt areas than in the Sun Belt (outside of oddball areas like New Orleans, Charleston, and Savannah).

Run-down older areas: Anywhere where most of the housing stock is older (though not always prewar) and there has little in the way of new investment for decades. In some cases localized decline can be so advanced that structures are outright abandoned and vacant lots proliferate. This is the prototypical "Rust Belt" typology, but can be found in pockets (particularly in white-flight and/or slow-growth metros) throughout the Sun Belt as well.

New construction areas: Basically anywhere where just about everything seems relatively new. Often this means suburban sprawl - miles of McMansion tract housing interspersed with commercial strips. However, there are semi-walkable/urban forms of new construction as well, where entire "new urbanist" districts have sprouted in areas which formerly had little in the way of development. This typology is dominant in areas which have seen rapid growth over the last two generations - which mostly means the Sun Belt. However, it can be found in high-growth parts of the "Rust Belt" as well, such as Indy and Columbus.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2019, 12:07 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,825 posts, read 12,333,377 times
Reputation: 4779
Quote:
Originally Posted by SK115 View Post
Despite being a hop, skip, and a jump from Houston, the Beaumont-Port Arthur area has not benefited from the growth going on in the big Texas cities.

It's basically like the rust belt of East Texas. And to think that is where oil was first discovered in Texas.
I agree that its not quite as booming as Houston, DFW, or Austin but I wouldn't compare it to the Rust Belt since the oil industry is still in very good shape and those refineries and plants are humming along great, not being shuttered. In that way its comparable to Lake Charles, Louisiana (not too far down the highway) and a lot of the Baton Rouge area where the plants have brought a lot of new job growth, just not the typical Sunbelt levels.

Both Texas and Louisiana still have a lot of manufacturing jobs. While manufacturing has declined preciptously on a national level ,the factory jobs that remain are mostly in the South.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2019, 12:11 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,825 posts, read 12,333,377 times
Reputation: 4779
Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
PA is not all Rust Belt, but there are major inconsistencies. It's a hard state to characterize based on the interstate drive-through, where stupid 1950's-60's decisions continue to haunt the road network. (The entire community of Breezewood is oft cited here. )

Generally, the areas south and east of Blue Mountain (i.e. along the I-81/78 corridors, and south and east; greater Philadelphia, and the Northeast Corridor penumbra) are growing economically. The hyper-division of PA local governments with small city limits does reveal some municipalities in this area, such as the City of Reading, pointing out as Flint-level distressed. These are localized inconsistencies in a growing region.

Past Blue Mountain (which may need to move slightly to embrace Monroe County, the more intensely developed/redeveloped "Pocono" area), decline is more uniform other than in core Pittsburgh, and around State College. PA's population center keeps moving east, and ever so slightly north. Some more rural areas beyond Blue Mountain are holding their own better than others. The old coal towns east and west continue to empty out, though some in the east see some cost of living migration (Hazleton, the odd place where industrial parks actually fill up, is now full of new immigrants instead of children of old). Scranton/Wilkes-Barre sees some new building as churning, the combined urban area population is still falling. A few isolated rural areas see stable farms and gas fracking, or as the base of an isolated growing enterprise (Sheetz employs many more Altoonans than the railroad now). In some areas, the promise of gas has fizzled and dairy farming has crashed, so there's even the possibility of new rust.
Yes I don't know how big the shale boom is in Western Pennsylvania but a LOT of Pennsylvania cities/towns are the essence of the Rust Belt including Pittsburgh, Scranton, Bethlehem, Wilkes-Barre, Johnstown, Erie and Altoona. Philadelphia also felt VERY economically depressed though I'm not sure how much of that is due to de-industrialization and how much is simply due to generational poverty that's always been there.

The Rust Belt is a unique kind of American poverty in that its a region that's fallen from grace, that used to be prosperous but is now in dire straits with people losing hope in the future. This is different than an area like the Mississippi Delta or urban ghettos where people have been poor altogether, due to a homegrown kind of American poverty. Then you have areas like Miami, Los Angeles, South Texas, the Rio Grande Valley etc where you have Third World type poverty imported by immigrants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top