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Old 12-29-2018, 05:44 PM
 
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Bushwick, Brooklyn is the hipster capital of New York and I'm very familiar with it. But I haven't been to hipster neighborhoods in other cities yet, so I'm curious as to how they compare. . In other cities, I've heard of the hipster capitals being places like Wicker Park in Chicago or Echo Park in LA.

Although I have been to Philly a few times, I haven't checked out their hipster neighborhoods like Fishtown and Northern Liberties.

As for what makes a hipster neighborhood, well it's one of those things you just know if you're in one. But I guess I can give specific criteria such as being the process of gentrification, having a lot of bars and coffee shops, being left leaning, being home to artsy people, embracing street art, etc.
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Old 12-29-2018, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
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I've been to Fishtown/Kensington in Philly and can certainly appreciate it's level of hipsterness.


But as for places I've lived, I have always been a fan of the low key hipster hoods in mid-sized or smaller cities. South Wedge in Rochester NY and Del Ray in Alexandria VA stand out in my experience.
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Old 12-29-2018, 09:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mryan13 View Post
I've been to Fishtown/Kensington in Philly and can certainly appreciate it's level of hipsterness.


But as for places I've lived, I have always been a fan of the low key hipster hoods in mid-sized or smaller cities. South Wedge in Rochester NY and Del Ray in Alexandria VA stand out in my experience.
Interestingly I think I have been to Kensington a few years ago and the part I saw looked like a wasteland without much gentrification.

It was by the Fairhill border, though.
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Old 12-29-2018, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Brookline
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Fishtown in Philly would be one of my favorites.

In Pittsburgh, a lot of people would tell you it is Lawrenceville, but the that neighborhood has rounded the corner from being hipster. I am by no means part of that crowd, but I would say Garfield is probably the new hipster neighborhood in Pittsburgh.
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Old 12-29-2018, 09:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PghYinzer View Post
Fishtown in Philly would be one of my favorites.

In Pittsburgh, a lot of people would tell you it is Lawrenceville, but the that neighborhood has rounded the corner from being hipster. I am by no means part of that crowd, but I would say Garfield is probably the new hipster neighborhood in Pittsburgh.
There's a similar situation in New York. Williamsburg is stereotyped as the hipster mecca (most people not in the know would probably pick that as New York's hipster capital), but it's so gentrified now that it really hasn't been for at least a few years. The current hipster capital is Bushwick, even though plenty of hipsters still live in and especially hang out in Williamsburg.
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Old 12-30-2018, 05:13 AM
 
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West Asheville is my favorite and while under gentrification for awhile still hasn't reached that level of "done" yet. It's very left leaning, artsy, has lots of restaurants/bars and coffee shops and a bit less uniform than most hipster neighborhoods I have run across (i.e. all men must have a beard).
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Old 12-30-2018, 12:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
West Asheville is my favorite and while under gentrification for awhile still hasn't reached that level of "done" yet. It's very left leaning, artsy, has lots of restaurants/bars and coffee shops and a bit less uniform than most hipster neighborhoods I have run across (i.e. all men must have a beard).
I went to Asheville back in 2010 and liked it (can't remember what part I stayed at), I thought it was cool but it was a little too suburban for my liking as a place to live year round.

As for the beard thing, that's funny because most hipsters I know in New York don't have the stereotypical hipster look (huge beards or mustaches) but you can still tell they're hipsters much of the time just by looking at them. If not looking at them, then talking to them.
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Old 12-30-2018, 01:19 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
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Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
There's a similar situation in New York. Williamsburg is stereotyped as the hipster mecca (most people not in the know would probably pick that as New York's hipster capital), but it's so gentrified now that it really hasn't been for at least a few years. The current hipster capital is Bushwick, even though plenty of hipsters still live in and especially hang out in Williamsburg.
Yeah, exactly. When a neighborhood like Williamsburg now has an Apple, a JCrew, an Urban Outfitters, a Whole Foods and a few Starbucks, it has moved well beyond "hipster phase."
Williamsburg is now a yuppie neighborhood, sitting amongst the ranks of nicer and expensive neighborhoods in NYC such as the West Village, Tribeca, Upper West Side, etc.

The "hipsters" hanging out in Williamsburg are those either masquerading as hipsters when not working in their $100k jobs, or still living off mommy and daddy's bankroll, or those few legitimate artists/hipsters who managed to secure a living situation deal somehow in Williamsburg, but hang in Bushwick.

Personally, I've never liked Bushwick, aesthetically. It fell to such low, tough time "ghetto" ranks in the 1970s/80s, and was fueled by drugs, gangs and rats in the 90s, that the early 2000s slow revitalization and continuing today, feels less hipster and more developer-pushed.
But I suppose that is true with all hipster neighborhoods. Ultimately they become more and more developed until rent is too high for the hipster/artist population, then the "new" hipster neighborhood is ushered in.
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Old 12-30-2018, 02:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Yeah, exactly. When a neighborhood like Williamsburg now has an Apple, a JCrew, an Urban Outfitters, a Whole Foods and a few Starbucks, it has moved well beyond "hipster phase."
Williamsburg is now a yuppie neighborhood, sitting amongst the ranks of nicer and expensive neighborhoods in NYC such as the West Village, Tribeca, Upper West Side, etc.

The "hipsters" hanging out in Williamsburg are those either masquerading as hipsters when not working in their $100k jobs, or still living off mommy and daddy's bankroll, or those few legitimate artists/hipsters who managed to secure a living situation deal somehow in Williamsburg, but hang in Bushwick.

Personally, I've never liked Bushwick, aesthetically. It fell to such low, tough time "ghetto" ranks in the 1970s/80s, and was fueled by drugs, gangs and rats in the 90s, that the early 2000s slow revitalization and continuing today, feels less hipster and more developer-pushed.
But I suppose that is true with all hipster neighborhoods. Ultimately they become more and more developed until rent is too high for the hipster/artist population, then the "new" hipster neighborhood is ushered in.
Agreed. Williamsburg is now a yuppie neighborhood like one you'd find in Lower Manhattan, although South Williamsburg isn't as yuppie-ish.

Well a lot of people come to Williamsburg to hang out from other neighborhoods, like Bushwick. Bushwick has a lot of good dive bars, but doesn't have nearly as many clubs as Williamsburg yet. Williamsburg also has more music venues.

I personally like Bushwick a lot, I think it's at a good point where there are a lot of gentry related amenities, but the neighborhood is still overwhelmingly working class.

I also disagree that it's developer pushed, because most of the hipsters are living in the old buildings. I think the development is driven by the gentrification much more than the other way around.

Last edited by Foamposite; 12-30-2018 at 02:18 PM..
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Old 12-30-2018, 10:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I went to Asheville back in 2010 and liked it (can't remember what part I stayed at), I thought it was cool but it was a little too suburban for my liking as a place to live year round.

As for the beard thing, that's funny because most hipsters I know in New York don't have the stereotypical hipster look (huge beards or mustaches) but you can still tell they're hipsters much of the time just by looking at them. If not looking at them, then talking to them.
Asheville is hardly suburban, but ok. Also while perhaps hard to believe for ypu but NYC doesn't set the definition for everything given in hipsterdom in most cities, the "beard bro" look is in fact a thing.
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