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Old 01-11-2019, 10:46 AM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,462,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
Technically true, but I still say that most people in the US use subway/metro/rapid transit interchangeably in addition to local terminology. Chicago calls it the “L” but to me it qualifies as an example of a subway system even though it’s not called that and it’s mostly above ground.

I don't think its true that most people use subway in the US to refer to their rail system, regardless of whether its a subway, outside of NYC and to a lesser extent Philly. I think far more often they use the name or nickname of the local system, such as Metro, BART, the El, the T, etc.


Although if you know of a completely above ground rail system that anybody regularly calls 'the subway', it would be interesting to hear it, because I would find that to be very odd.
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Old 01-11-2019, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
I don't think its true that most people use subway in the US to refer to their rail system, regardless of whether its a subway, outside of NYC and to a lesser extent Philly. I think far more often they use the name or nickname of the local system, such as Metro, BART, the El, the T, etc.


Although if you know of a completely above ground rail system that anybody regularly calls 'the subway', it would be interesting to hear it, because I would find that to be very odd.
I think that you misunderstood. The topic isn’t whether people in US cities call their metro the “subway”. The topic was whether or not they have a subway. I know that people in DC call their subway “the metro” and people in Chicago say the “L”. Just as people in London call it the Underground and in Paris the Metro. My point is that if you ask people in DC if the have a subway, they would say yes.

I guess I’m saying that there’s the “Subway” as a proper noun in NYC, but there’s also subway as a noun used to describe a mode of transit and I think for most people that it’s synonymous with metro and rapid transit. This is just my experience. YMMV.

I agree that it doesn’t make sense to refer to a completely above ground metro as a subway. The only one that I know of is Miami.
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Old 01-11-2019, 01:20 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,462,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
I think that you misunderstood. The topic isn’t whether people in US cities call their metro the “subway”. The topic was whether or not they have a subway. I know that people in DC call their subway “the metro” and people in Chicago say the “L”. Just as people in London call it the Underground and in Paris the Metro. My point is that if you ask people in DC if the have a subway, they would say yes.

I guess I’m saying that there’s the “Subway” as a proper noun in NYC, but there’s also subway as a noun used to describe a mode of transit and I think for most people that it’s synonymous with metro and rapid transit. This is just my experience. YMMV.

I agree that it doesn’t make sense to refer to a completely above ground metro as a subway. The only one that I know of is Miami.

I know what the thread topic is - I didn't misunderstand. I was responding specifically to your quote that people use the terms subway and metro and rapit transit completely interchangeably. and I'm saying I don't think that's true. I don't think anyone calls a completely above ground rapid transit system a subway, but I'm open to hearing about it if you have an example.
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Old 01-11-2019, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,918 posts, read 3,635,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
I know what the thread topic is - I didn't misunderstand. I was responding specifically to your quote that people use the terms subway and metro and rapit transit completely interchangeably. and I'm saying I don't think that's true. I don't think anyone calls a completely above ground rapid transit system a subway, but I'm open to hearing about it if you have an example.
You said that you didnít think that most people in the US use the word subway to refer to their rail system. No one said that they did, including me.

As for your question regarding whether people refer to a completely above ground system as a subway, I already answered that. You quoted my answer. I agree with you. There arenít many examples of completely above ground rapid transit (Miami is one), but where they exist it wouldnít make sense to call that system a subway. Im speaking in general terms. If you asked someone from most cities that have rapid transit if their city has a subway, I think that they would say yes. Maybe Iím wrong. Itís not a big deal if we disagree.
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Old 01-11-2019, 03:10 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,462,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
You said that you didn’t think that most people in the US use the word subway to refer to their rail system. No one said that they did, including me.

As for your question regarding whether people refer to a completely above ground system as a subway, I already answered that. You quoted my answer. I agree with you. There aren’t many examples of completely above ground rapid transit (Miami is one), but where they exist it wouldn’t make sense to call that system a subway. Im speaking in general terms. If you asked someone from most cities that have rapid transit if their city has a subway, I think that they would say yes. Maybe I’m wrong. It’s not a big deal if we disagree.

Right not a big deal. but you did say people use the word subway interchangeably with metro or rapid transit. Which is true in some cities that really do have a subway - but not for above ground systems. Some people who've posted in this thread and another one, really didn't know the difference. That's why I wanted to clarify it. I guess they don't realize the sub in subway means underground, or just never thought about it.
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Old 01-12-2019, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
1,506 posts, read 2,170,560 times
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Exhaustive list and descriptions of rail transit systems across America:
https://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/United_States
Every one that operates underground has been mentioned here. I guess there are others within large complexes, like the US Capitol or large airports (ATL, DEN, IAD, IAH, MSP).

Quote:
Originally Posted by vter View Post
Does Cincinnati count? Subway was partially built but never opened.
Same with Rochester.

Last edited by paytonc; 01-12-2019 at 04:58 PM..
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,293 posts, read 3,508,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
DC def has many; it seems MARTA comes above ground mostly outside the DT, as does a lot of Boston subways
MARTA has several underground suburban segments and stations, most notably Decatur and Sandy Springs. Lindbergh Center, Buckhead and Lenox Stations are below street level and topped with development, but not totally underground.
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Old 01-13-2019, 03:39 AM
 
94 posts, read 31,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Seattle is building most of its light rail underground. The center city connections are underground and have been for two decades. The downtown Seattle to University of Washington segment, (completed) is underground, and the extension to Northgate will also be below ground. Compare to Portland, where there are few underground lines.
Only 1 underground station in Portland at the zoo.

Portland's light rail is agonizingly slow through downtown and the Lloyd District but the first line was opened 23 years before Seattle's first line. Portland also has 97 stations and 60 miles of track versus 16 stations and 20 miles for Seattle.

Portland will build the SW corridor first and then with all sectors of the metro area will undoubtedly put the central city portions of all lines into a subway.

Different approaches for different needs, funding and geographies. I imagine that in 30 years the systems will be fairly similar but Seattle, being a bigger, richer city with very constrained geography will have a larger subterranean component.
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Old 01-13-2019, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,609 posts, read 1,107,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
I don't think its true that most people use subway in the US to refer to their rail system, regardless of whether its a subway, outside of NYC and to a lesser extent Philly. I think far more often they use the name or nickname of the local system, such as Metro, BART, the El, the T, etc.


Although if you know of a completely above ground rail system that anybody regularly calls 'the subway', it would be interesting to hear it, because I would find that to be very odd.
Definitely not true in D.C. I was in Dupont Circle and some tourists came up to me and asked me to point them towards the subway.

I told them there was a Subway about 15 minutes away.

It only dawned on me as I was walking by Dupont Circle Station about 5 minutes later that they might have meant the Metro.

Ran back and caught them and, sure enough, they wanted the transit not the sub shop.

It's a fun story in hindsight but, as I told them, in D.C. the metro is the metro, not the "subway" or the "train."
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Old 01-13-2019, 12:48 PM
 
9,381 posts, read 9,539,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
Definitely not true in D.C. I was in Dupont Circle and some tourists came up to me and asked me to point them towards the subway.

I told them there was a Subway about 15 minutes away.

It only dawned on me as I was walking by Dupont Circle Station about 5 minutes later that they might have meant the Metro.

Ran back and caught them and, sure enough, they wanted the transit not the sub shop.

It's a fun story in hindsight but, as I told them, in D.C. the metro is the metro, not the "subway" or the "train."
If you asked someone from DC if DChad a Subway you’d say “Yes, WMRTA or Metro.”

Same thing in Boston if someone asked if Boston has a Subway they’d respond “YEs, the T” even though they’d never say I’m going to jump on the Subway.
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