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Old 01-22-2019, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,066 posts, read 36,285,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
No place is perfect, but the latest trends in migration suggest more people would rather live in an area that is growing with decent weather ("decent" meaning little snow and sunny/short winters) instead of an area that's stagnant with poor weather.

BTW, Houston has a sales tax of 8.25%, almost as high as Tennessee.
True on all counts. I do want to point out though that while Houston does have high sales tax (still lower though than TN), it does not have the tax on groceries that TN has.

That being said, not having state income tax is nice even with higher sales or property taxes - that is if you make much money. For instance, take Arkansas. (Please take Arkansas - LOL.) Arkansas has a state income tax but low property taxes. The low property taxes don't even come close to what the income taxes would be for some folks. So if you're making bank, it actually would cost you more to live in Little Rock than it would Houston - which is ironic.
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Old 01-22-2019, 05:29 AM
 
3,631 posts, read 1,221,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
True on all counts. I do want to point out though that while Houston does have high sales tax (still lower though than TN), it does not have the tax on groceries that TN has.

That being said, not having state income tax is nice even with higher sales or property taxes - that is if you make much money. For instance, take Arkansas. (Please take Arkansas - LOL.) Arkansas has a state income tax but low property taxes. The low property taxes don't even come close to what the income taxes would be for some folks. So if you're making bank, it actually would cost you more to live in Little Rock than it would Houston - which is ironic.
Well sure.

Not to get political, but that's because sales taxes by their nature are regressive, thus meant to benefit those who spend a much smaller share of their income on consumables.
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Old 01-22-2019, 05:56 AM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv95 View Post
I said maybe Mutiny. But is it that bad down there in terms of earning a living?
No, but I was wondering what was so special about Greensboro compared to just about any other metro its size in the Southeast. Now if you meant to say Durham or Raleigh, then I'd understand.
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Old 01-22-2019, 06:19 AM
 
224 posts, read 114,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
A lot of Northerners automatically move South, but why not the South West or West? I found it much better than anywhere in the South personally speaking.
The plain answer is that it is closer. I live in the Upper Midwest now and the last comment I got from a hometown friend was, "Wow, you're out there." People commonly wonder why I would ever go so far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv95 View Post
The South economically is fools gold. Your wages are likely gonna decrease with a few exceptions. You're fleeing high costs to soon realize the money you're saving in rent/housing they'll get you in other ways.
The major cities will still probably be cheaper than any of the major cities in the Northeast. I agree the Midwest is a better deal but it doesn't have the mild weather or positive media attention.

Whether it's fool's gold depends on where you are in life. I think it can be great for a middle-aged person with savings and an established career, retiree or semi-retiree, who moves to a less "fancy" suburb of a major Southeastern city. I tell people my age, the younger Millenials, that it's better to stay up in the Northeast until they gain more experience. The Southeast can be big on years of experience, connections, your alma mater, etc which a fairly new graduate from the North won't have. If you lose a job bouncing back may not be easy.

I'm not so familiar with cities west of Louisiana so I'm not referring to them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
The migration is happening based off of false pretenses though. People think "oh wow there are so many people moving to NC/SC/GA/FL maybe I should go too" but they're not realizing what they're sacrificing by doing so.
Agreed. People need to visit places and really get a feel for them. Paying so much attention to what people they know are doing or what the media says the hottest city is at the moment can lead you astray.

On the other hand people who know both regions well need to be more honest about some of the differences. I think when people move back, the main reasons besides economics are socio-cultural. A city is not just a city. It exists in a state, with a certain history, demographics, amenities. To start.
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Old 01-22-2019, 07:51 AM
 
Location: FW, Indiander
825 posts, read 1,300,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
No, but I was wondering what was so special about Greensboro compared to just about any other metro its size in the Southeast. Now if you meant to say Durham or Raleigh, then I'd understand.
Maybe I'm looking at the wrong job sites, but blue collar jobs(janitorial, warehousing/inventory control, production, etc.) have hourly wages in both cities that are atrocious. And the cost of living is too high in terms of renting on top of that. At least in Greensboro despite the lower wages I won't have an issue finding a studio/1BR apt in a decent area for under $700.
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Old 01-22-2019, 07:56 AM
 
3,631 posts, read 1,221,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv95 View Post
Maybe I'm looking at the wrong job sites, but blue collar jobs(janitorial, warehousing/inventory control, production, etc.) have hourly wages in both cities that are atrocious. And the cost of living is too high in terms of renting on top of that. At least in Greensboro despite the lower wages I won't have an issue finding a studio/1BR apt in a decent area for under $700.
FWIW, not everyone relocates to those cities for blue collar jobs.

The salaried and health care jobs are fairly competitive with the ones up north, especially if you're working for a F500 company.
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Old 01-22-2019, 08:37 AM
 
6,984 posts, read 14,112,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
FWIW, not everyone relocates to those cities for blue collar jobs.

The salaried and health care jobs are fairly competitive with the ones up north, especially if you're working for a F500 company.
That's often the problem though. Those jobs pay well, but are often for people transferring within the company from a larger office in the Northeast/Midwest. Even in SoCal, a lot of the people who are really making it are those that were relocated there for work. It's not often that someone from there or that moved there without a job gets the same lifestyle. OTOH, there are plenty of people in NYC who are born and raised in the city or NJ/LI/Westchester Co./CT that have great jobs. And in Philly, those from South Jersey, DE, and the Main Line often have great jobs as well. I see far more successful people native to the NYC metro doing well in NYC, than I do those native to the LA metro doing well in LA. Most of my friends from high school in LA that are doing well have moved away from LA to get better jobs. Those that stayed do not seem to be doing so well.

And LA isn't "Sunbelt" in the typical sense, but it's a major destination in the more southern parts of the US with "better" weather. Many of the partners in the big law firms and the people high up in corporations put in for transfers from the Midwest and Northeast. So working your way up the corporate ladder isn't as easy in a place like LA, since the top is often filled by someone that started somewhere else.
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Old 01-22-2019, 09:17 AM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv95 View Post
Maybe I'm looking at the wrong job sites, but blue collar jobs(janitorial, warehousing/inventory control, production, etc.) have hourly wages in both cities that are atrocious. And the cost of living is too high in terms of renting on top of that. At least in Greensboro despite the lower wages I won't have an issue finding a studio/1BR apt in a decent area for under $700.
But Raleigh/Durham also has a lot of well-paying STEM/knowledge-based, white-collar, and healthcare jobs due to RTP, the universities, the hospitals, and state government. If you have one of those jobs, you'd be sitting pretty in the Triangle. As far as your point concerning Greensboro, that's pretty much the case for all similarly-sized (and smaller) cities throughout the Southeast in general, especially those with larger manufacturing/warehousing sectors. That's why I expressed surprise when you singled out Greensboro.
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Old 01-22-2019, 09:23 AM
 
6,984 posts, read 14,112,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But Raleigh/Durham also has a lot of well-paying STEM/knowledge-based, white-collar, and healthcare jobs due to RTP, the universities, the hospitals, and state government. If you have one of those jobs, you'd be sitting pretty in the Triangle. As far as your point concerning Greensboro, that's pretty much the case for all similarly-sized (and smaller) cities throughout the Southeast in general, especially those with larger manufacturing/warehousing sectors. That's why I expressed surprise when you singled out Greensboro.
I think that's one of the few areas in the South where it could be easy to move and live better off. But also, FWIW, look at the influence of the Northeast there still, with Duke being a massive draw for college students all over the Northeast.
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Old 01-22-2019, 09:31 AM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
I think that's one of the few areas in the South where it could be easy to move and live better off. But also, FWIW, look at the influence of the Northeast there still, with Duke being a massive draw for college students all over the Northeast.
This is true.
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