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Old 01-02-2019, 08:45 AM
 
56,637 posts, read 80,930,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjoseph View Post
Those states have migration numbers almost as bad as NYS.
They do?: https://theurbanphoenix.com/2018/12/...retheyleaving/
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Old 01-02-2019, 09:02 AM
 
2,512 posts, read 2,272,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpier015 View Post
Distinct but not distinct enough for the average resident to think of NOVA as a different state given the number of residents that VRE deeper into NOVA and to DC for work. If they had said Caroline I probably wouldn't have mentioned it. I just don't see the average Fredericksburg resident sharing those sentiments.
I've met plenty of people from Fredericksburg that refer to Nova w/ the slightest bit of the "other Virginia" mindset. Alot of people that live there also want to take advantage of DC jobs/wages but in general don't like the lifestyle of the DC area.
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Old 01-02-2019, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Sweet Home Chicago!
5,184 posts, read 3,720,276 times
Reputation: 6093
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I was vacationing in Tampa during the holidays. And the entire time, my kids were asking me - "Why exactly do we live up there and not here?"

lol
That's because they're on vacation and they're in a different frame of mind. Take them there in July and watch the look on their face when they exit the nice cool hotel room into a 90 degree/90% humidity morning. You have to think about what it's like to live there year round with no change of seasons. My kids hated living in the South. Every year I had to hear, Dad, do you think we'll get any snow this year? enough to build a snowman, enough for snowball fights, enough to go sledding? and my response year after year was well, I hope so, but it never happened and they were miserable. Florida is a nice place to vacation, love going to Disney once in a while, but it's a terrible place to live, IMO.
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Old 01-02-2019, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,656,614 times
Reputation: 10169
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpier015 View Post
You found Richmond to be more southern than Jamestown?
Technically she said Williamsburg, not Jamestown. Although they're right next to each other, so I get what you mean. At any rate, I'd guess what the OP was observing is that both Williamsburg and Jamestown have a much higher percentage of residents who moved from the northeast than Richmond does, thus being a reason she might feel comfortable there.
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Old 01-02-2019, 10:50 AM
 
6,968 posts, read 14,097,897 times
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If we can count CA as "northern" in its pace, lifestyle, politics, etc., then I'll say I did not enjoy my move to the South. Moved from Los Angeles to Louisville for school.

Even though the major cities of the South, including Louisville, are liberal in the cities themselves, the state politics are still miserably behind the times in regards to equality and caring for their citizens. And even in the cities or their respective MSAs, people can still be behind the times in other ways. I.e. Louisville is liberal in regards to diversity and equality, but the residents are some of the biggest NIMBYs I've ever met. Anything remotely progressive in building is seen as those darn Northern elites coming to destroy their Southern way of life, even though Louisville isn't even that Southern. Building large mid/high rises in downtown is seen as scary, and how dare you build more than a 2 story apartment complex in any of the other neighborhoods; the residents will fight you with all of their white privilege and often win. Other cities have those people too, but they never seem to give in to them quite like Louisville does. The people have no interest in public transit funding at all, and the city continues to discuss freeway expansions and extensions, including destroying the Ohio River waterfront in other ways, after it just expanded the massive interchange on the river and already has an interstate blocking the entire city off from the riverfront.

In general, I just felt like I stepped back in time 10-15 years in almost every way. I don't dislike Louisville, but it's not as forward-thinking as what I'd like in a city. And although other factors played into it, look what happened in Nashville for their public transit funding vote.

Then don't get me started on how slow everyone drives, how everyone needs to tell their life story to a cashier at the gas station while you're in a rush, and just in general how the south moves soooooo much slower than what I'm used to. To each their own. Just wasn't for me.

Also, while COL is lower in the south, it doesn't always make up for the lower incomes down there. It's catching up, but northern cities (and lumping in the west coast because politically similar) generally have better wages, better employee protections, better housing protections, and better protections on just being alive and well. So you might be able to afford a bigger home in the south, but for certain groups of people, our economic wellbeing and livelihood is more at risk in the south than in the north.

Last edited by jessemh431; 01-02-2019 at 11:05 AM..
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Old 01-02-2019, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Baltimore - Richmond
501 posts, read 331,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
Technically she said Williamsburg, not Jamestown. Although they're right next to each other, so I get what you mean. At any rate, I'd guess what the OP was observing is that both Williamsburg and Jamestown have a much higher percentage of residents who moved from the northeast than Richmond does, thus being a reason she might feel comfortable there.
I was being facetious. I actually love Williamsburg and find the cultures of Williamsburg and Richmond to be connected. Its just always funny to me the imaginary lines that get drawn all over Virginia on here.
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Old 01-02-2019, 05:36 PM
 
179 posts, read 90,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
There are several small coastal towns in Virginia that might really appeal to you. Some are artsy, some are also pretty old and definitely quaint. Then you'd have the best of both worlds. Consider Mathews, Kilmarnock, Tappahannock, Hayes, Montross, and (my personal favorite) Gloucester Courthouse. If being near a beach isn't a top priority, you might consider towns like Floyd, harrisonburg, and (another favorite) Gordonsville

My town (Williamsburg) isn't exactly coastal, but we do have three nice beaches within ten miles. It's a good choice for people who like being around other people from the northeast, considering the high number of people from NY, NJ, PA, and New England who have retired here. If you'd find that interesting I wrote a long thread on the Virginia forum about reasons to retire here. There are also a few threads on the Retirement Forum on Williamsburg as a retirement choice; one even has a whole bunch of photos. Getting back to my post in the VA forum, a lot of the things in my list might also be applicable to some of the other towns near here. Not sure if you're interested in coastal VA, but if you are city-data has a lot of detailed info on the area.
Thank you Piney Creek for that information! The only town from your list that I heard of was Kilmarnock, which is on my list to visit. I did a quick search of Gloucester and Gordonsville and the pictures online look beautiful! Looks like I will have more roads trips this year.

And I love Williamsburg! I think that would be a safe bet for retirement. It's a beautiful area, people are very nice and it has all the stores one would need for every day shopping, although I wish Wegmans was close by. I also heard there are many retirees from NE and NOVA so I wouldn't have to worry about "fitting-in". Williamsburg is also great because it's not as hot as lets FL and the winters aren't harsh as NE.
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Old 01-02-2019, 05:58 PM
 
179 posts, read 90,089 times
Reputation: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
If we can count CA as "northern" in its pace, lifestyle, politics, etc., then I'll say I did not enjoy my move to the South. Moved from Los Angeles to Louisville for school.

Even though the major cities of the South, including Louisville, are liberal in the cities themselves, the state politics are still miserably behind the times in regards to equality and caring for their citizens. And even in the cities or their respective MSAs, people can still be behind the times in other ways. I.e. Louisville is liberal in regards to diversity and equality, but the residents are some of the biggest NIMBYs I've ever met. Anything remotely progressive in building is seen as those darn Northern elites coming to destroy their Southern way of life, even though Louisville isn't even that Southern. Building large mid/high rises in downtown is seen as scary, and how dare you build more than a 2 story apartment complex in any of the other neighborhoods; the residents will fight you with all of their white privilege and often win. Other cities have those people too, but they never seem to give in to them quite like Louisville does. The people have no interest in public transit funding at all, and the city continues to discuss freeway expansions and extensions, including destroying the Ohio River waterfront in other ways, after it just expanded the massive interchange on the river and already has an interstate blocking the entire city off from the riverfront.

In general, I just felt like I stepped back in time 10-15 years in almost every way. I don't dislike Louisville, but it's not as forward-thinking as what I'd like in a city. And although other factors played into it, look what happened in Nashville for their public transit funding vote.

Then don't get me started on how slow everyone drives, how everyone needs to tell their life story to a cashier at the gas station while you're in a rush, and just in general how the south moves soooooo much slower than what I'm used to. To each their own. Just wasn't for me.

Also, while COL is lower in the south, it doesn't always make up for the lower incomes down there. It's catching up, but northern cities (and lumping in the west coast because politically similar) generally have better wages, better employee protections, better housing protections, and better protections on just being alive and well. So you might be able to afford a bigger home in the south, but for certain groups of people, our economic wellbeing and livelihood is more at risk in the south than in the north.
Your post reminds me of my recent conversation I had with a friend who is originally from CT and now lives in New Orleans. She has been living in New Orleans for 6 yrs. and she can't take it anymore. She's been trying to get a job in Chicago, DC, Philly, NY or Boston. But even if she doesn't get a job somewhere north by July, she will just move back with her mom temporarily because she just wants to leave. She said she would never move South again.

Over Christmas, I was in CT and heard that a lot of individuals from CT who moved South are moving back to CT. That was in addition to posts I was reading online. So that sparked my interest and made me wonder: were those anomalies or is this more prevalent trend? Hmm.
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Old 01-02-2019, 06:16 PM
 
3,620 posts, read 1,207,162 times
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I know several people who live (or used to live) in CT through my job.

They love the state for its natural beauty, proximity to the ocean, the extremely high value it places on education and its socially progressive politics.

However, what turns them off are the state's financial problems (I understand they're flirting with possible bankruptcy), which has led to obscene taxes and a vacuum of major employers (GE, Aetna, etc.).

They also have trouble competing with the big city amenities offered in neighboring NYC and Boston when it comes to attracting younger residents, in an era where people prefer vibrant urban neighborhoods/town centers over far flung bedroom communities (which was always CT's "Je Ne Sais Quoi").

Last edited by citidata18; 01-02-2019 at 06:26 PM..
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Old 01-02-2019, 06:55 PM
 
798 posts, read 291,004 times
Reputation: 792
I see a lot of Yankees say they want to move back to see home again. Funnily enough, us Southerners were thinking the same thing, we want you back up north so we can see home again. I kid, I kid. But seriously, do you need help with the packing?
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