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Old 01-11-2019, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,101 posts, read 4,737,517 times
Reputation: 5374

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Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTheLiveOaks View Post
Didnít read the whole thread, but Iím of the opinion that urban vs rural is a much starker divide (in the south and elsewhere) than any contiguous region.
Wholly agreed.

 
Old 01-12-2019, 12:40 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,744 posts, read 6,146,579 times
Reputation: 3594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Because the Northeastern cities were magnets for immigrants early in their histories and have been defined by those cultures for about as long as they have actually been cities. With few exceptions (most notably New Orleans), it's not the same story in the South where immigration on a larger scale is mostly a newer phenomenon.
This is a rare occasion where I don't agree with you. You're stating facts, but I don't agree that there's a cutoff time for immigrant influence.
 
Old 01-12-2019, 09:10 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
Reputation: 18522
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
This is a rare occasion where I don't agree with you. You're stating facts, but I don't agree that there's a cutoff time for immigrant influence.
What do you mean by "a cutoff time for immigrant influence"?
 
Old 01-12-2019, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,294 posts, read 3,512,168 times
Reputation: 4464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
As for the blacks, many (most) of Miami's blacks have roots in the Caribbean, not so much the South.
You've bought into the popular 'alternative' history pushed by many Miamians here, desperate to deny any connection to their own region. It simply isn't true to claim 'most' were Caribbean, it's an oft repeated myth.

Quote:
There were no plantations in FL South of the Panhandle
Absolutely NOT true. Look it up, but you won't like what you find.
 
Old 01-12-2019, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,986,679 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
You've bought into the popular 'alternative' history pushed by many Miamians here, desperate to deny any connection to their own region. It simply isn't true to claim 'most' were Caribbean, it's an oft repeated myth.



Absolutely NOT true. Look it up, but you won't like what you find.
Inclined to agree with you here. Florida is not a northern state located in the south
 
Old 01-12-2019, 09:59 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,807,465 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
The Tidewater should include all of Eastern and Northern Virginia as well as Eastern Maryland. Baltimore could also be included. Baltimore is more of a border city between Tidewater Mid-Atlantic and the Pennsylvania midlands.

In my opinion, the Upper South should only include the Appalachian regions of the south while Eastern Virginia and Maryland should be called Tidewater or Chesapeake.


My map is included in the link below. It also includes areas outside of the South and Mid-Atlantic regions but is not completely finished. The counties of Fairfax, Prince William, Arlington, Alexandria city, the District of Columbia, and Montgomery could be included in their own region you wish to separate the DC area from the rest of the Chesapeake region. The Appalachian region should also include parts of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

http://www.city-data.com/forum/attac...n-cultures.png
Uh. No. This is not a good map in my opinion. First of all, the Lower (Deep) South doesn't stop at the GA/FL line. Much of N. Florida is certainly Lower (Deep) South. Also, south of Melbourne, Florida stops being culturally Southern (more so on the east side of Florida than the west side).
Likewise, "The South" doesn't end in a hard line at the Texas border either. In other words, neither geography nor cultures arbitrarily stop at state borders.
The entire Piedmont megalopolis from Atlanta (maybe as far west as Birmingham) to Raleigh (maybe up to Richmond) should be in the same category.
I am confused by why you call your map "Early American Cultures". What does that mean? Also, much of this area wasn't even colonized in the Early American period.

Last edited by rnc2mbfl; 01-12-2019 at 10:27 PM..
 
Old 01-12-2019, 10:05 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,807,465 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Miamians of all races/ethnicites will tell you that they are southern. Miami being a southern city is widely acknowledged. It's distant from what YOUR narrow definition of southern is, but that doesn't make Miami any less southern just as NYC being hyper diverse doesn't make it less northern.
Uh, no we wouldn't. We understand that Miami is geographically in the South as the most southern major American city in the contiguous states, but most of us do not consider ourselves to be culturally Southerners. In fact, many of us don't even identify as Americans (though I certainly do).
 
Old 01-13-2019, 12:10 AM
 
1,508 posts, read 524,859 times
Reputation: 1129
Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelTerritory View Post
See attached. Is this a good (rough) map of the South-- Upper and Deep. Upper in orange and Deep in red.
So Paducah, Kentucky and Hampton Roads are now part of the Deep South? As in more Southern than Atlanta or Huntsville, Alabama?
 
Old 01-13-2019, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,101 posts, read 4,737,517 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
So Paducah, Kentucky and Hampton Roads are now part of the Deep South?
In the definition that deep south means lowland south, yes.
 
Old 01-13-2019, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Miami-Dade
396 posts, read 137,156 times
Reputation: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
You've bought into the popular 'alternative' history pushed by many Miamians here, desperate to deny any connection to their own region. It simply isn't true to claim 'most' were Caribbean, it's an oft repeated myth.
It does seem to be true for Miami-Dade proper atleast. Southern accents are so rare around here that you automatically assume the person is a tourist. Broward County is where you'll find many more people with ties to the "real" south.
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