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Old 01-13-2019, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
425 posts, read 295,270 times
Reputation: 736

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
So Paducah, Kentucky and Hampton Roads are now part of the Deep South? As in more Southern than Atlanta or Huntsville, Alabama?
Yes, Paducah has a delta, river vibe. Huntsville is Appalachia, more aligned with the Upper South.

 
Old 01-13-2019, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,214 posts, read 2,836,706 times
Reputation: 4507
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Uh, no we wouldn't. We understand that Miami is geographically in the South as the most southern major American city in the contiguous states, but most of us do not consider ourselves to be culturally Southerners. In fact, many of us don't even identify as Americans (though I certainly do).
Speak for yourself. I've known black, white, and Latino Miamians who identified as southern; there are black, white, and Latino Miami celebrities who identify as southern...

I have no idea if that constitutes "most" Miamians, am not claiming it to be so, but I definitely am not buying that most Miamians don't identify as southern, without a definition of what "most" means, because there is a fair share of Miamians who do...
 
Old 01-13-2019, 01:12 PM
 
1,508 posts, read 526,959 times
Reputation: 1129
Quote:
Originally Posted by KY_Transplant View Post
Yes, Paducah has a delta, river vibe. Huntsville is Appalachia, more aligned with the Upper South.
The South is the territory occupied by the former Confederate states, minus West Virginia, which flaked off to become a border state. The wannabe South are the border states of Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Missouri, and the former Confederate Territory of Oklahoma, which back then was too sparsely populated to have any real cultural connection with The South. Heck, Delaware and Maryland now are firmly part of the Northeast, while Missouri is solidly part of the Midwest. Oklahomans often consider themselves Midwestern, not Southern.

The Deep South is Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina, plus Northern Florida and East Texas. Hampton Roads is not the Deep South, it's the upper South.
 
Old 01-13-2019, 04:20 PM
 
12,026 posts, read 5,142,014 times
Reputation: 18867
As far as KY is concerned the only reason it didn't join the confederacy is because it had a wise governor who knew Louisville would be blown to kingdom come being across the Ohio River from much more populated northern states. In fact when Lincoln demanded the governor provide troops and money to the North, he refused and told Lincoln he would not contribute even $1 nor one person to fight against his Southern sister states.
KY was not only a slave state with plantations, but was well known for auctioning slaves and sending them South along the Mississippi. The inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe to write Uncle Tom's Cabin came from watching slave auctions in Northern KY along the Ohio River. Traditionally, Kentuckians have Southern accents, eat Southern food and overall have a slower Southern life style. No, it's not Louisiana, but it's Southern overall. Appalachia has it's own culture as well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ky_(U.S._state)
 
Old 01-13-2019, 05:47 PM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,415,389 times
Reputation: 18529
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
The Deep South is Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina, plus Northern Florida and East Texas. Hampton Roads is not the Deep South, it's the upper South.
HR is "upper' South in terms of latitude but not so much in terms of geography and history. I'd say most of eastern NC is also the deep South, which would make HR 'deep South-adjacent'...kinda like the Houston area and coastal Atlantic Florida starting somewhere south of St. Augustine.
 
Old 01-13-2019, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,089 posts, read 4,115,220 times
Reputation: 3704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Yup.. just like the op's map showed. I agree, there is a noticeable difference as you go South of here. I was in Richmond this weekend and it's not uncommon to hear a Southern light accent here and there from the local residents and in DC you'll only here it from someone that moved there from the South.
I agree as well.
 
Old 01-13-2019, 10:29 PM
 
2,518 posts, read 2,277,494 times
Reputation: 1846
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post

I don't know what the point of this comment was, as the typical Richmond accent isn't southern. It isn't uncommon to hear southern accents in Richmond, but so? Not really getting the point here...

Spence, you're making too much sense again. Remember, there is nothing southern about DC, let's continue to repeat it until true!
I was just noting that I agreed with the OPs map showing the border being somewhere South of DC. You start to notice Southern like characteristics like accents once you're in Richmond. I'm not sure what the specific accent is but it definitely sounds Southern light-ish to an outsider.

Also the few folks here that have said DC is culturally southern (reminder that ops map was about cultural lines) has said nothing else besides historical lines and the Black connection. What about DC is culturally southern to you about the daily lives of its residents.. the pace? the food? the hospitality? the accent? the commuting habits?

If you were to take a person with no historical reference and placed them in DC today they probably would not think they were in a Southern city.

Last edited by Ebck120; 01-13-2019 at 10:37 PM..
 
Old 01-14-2019, 07:37 AM
 
904 posts, read 767,934 times
Reputation: 1203
Unless that person was from New York or Boston. Pansies and decorative cabbage surviving the winter is one of the signs that you’re in a different geographic location. I never thought of this but I met some friends from Ohio in DC one winter about 15 years ago. The first thing they noticed was flowering plants in the winter.

But all this gets away from the crux. Washington is a Southern city. The culture there is Southern by virtue of the fact that it is Southern. It’s not like folks are still curtsying in Atlanta and Raleigh. How about defining what is Southern culture in 2019 (if demographics, history and geography are somehow irrelevant).
 
Old 01-14-2019, 08:01 AM
 
2,518 posts, read 2,277,494 times
Reputation: 1846
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
Unless that person was from New York or Boston. Pansies and decorative cabbage surviving the winter is one of the signs that youíre in a different geographic location. I never thought of this but I met some friends from Ohio in DC one winter about 15 years ago. The first thing they noticed was flowering plants in the winter.

But all this gets away from the crux. Washington is a Southern city. The culture there is Southern by virtue of the fact that it is Southern. Itís not like folks are still curtsying in Atlanta and Raleigh. How about defining what is Southern culture in 2019 (if demographics, history and geography are somehow irrelevant).
I've got some time... below are examples from a religion aspect.

https://philebersole.wordpress.com/2...ican-religion/

https://philebersole.wordpress.com/2...ican-religion/

https://philebersole.wordpress.com/2...ican-religion/

I mean there's just so many more examples that shows DC's relationship to it's northern neighbors being much stronger then the reverse from anything like the shows people watch to life expectancy to the extents of where yall is said and sweet tea is served..
 
Old 01-14-2019, 08:04 AM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,413 posts, read 7,713,869 times
Reputation: 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
The South is the territory occupied by the former Confederate states, minus West Virginia, which flaked off to become a border state. The wannabe South are the border states of Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Missouri, and the former Confederate Territory of Oklahoma, which back then was too sparsely populated to have any real cultural connection with The South. Heck, Delaware and Maryland now are firmly part of the Northeast, while Missouri is solidly part of the Midwest. Oklahomans often consider themselves Midwestern, not Southern.

The Deep South is Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina, plus Northern Florida and East Texas. Hampton Roads is not the Deep South, it's the upper South.

Native Okie here, that's pretty rare except when a weather or radio guy discusses weather patterns...and often Texas and Arkansas are included in the conversation.

The breakdown culturally for Oklahomans (i.e. the way we see ourselves) is just plain ol' Oklahoma Okie, Southwestern, Southern, Western, and then Midwestern. But if it is "Midwestern" it's rarely in conjunction with the greater Midwest such as Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, etc...and certainly not the Upper Midwest like Michigan, Minnesota, or Whisky.

I work with a guy from Minnesota, he routinely refers to Oklahoma as the South. Oklahoma is obviously more of a hybrid of western and southern. I see it much more as SOUTHwestern (Oklahoma, Texas, western Arkansas) as opposed to SouthWESTERN (New Mexico and Arizona) although there are a few similarities there too. "Midwestern" as used in the general consensus of what comprises the Midwest (Kansas and above and points east) is the least accurate in describing Oklahoma. Also, while some do, very few people here in Oklahoma associate Oklahoma with the Deep South. Likewise, we rarely associate purely with the Midwest (again, the classical understanding of that term/region) either. It's certainly not the Midwest. It's certainly not the Deep South. It's a good mixture of Southern and Western with a very good measure of the ranching/cattle culture of the Southwest. It's Southwestern more than anything else because of culture, history, and topography. Not to mention the Native American elements and history that squarely distance it from states north and east of it.


OU chant mentions the "the western sky..."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mhyv3V0leeI

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 01-14-2019 at 08:37 AM..
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