U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-16-2019, 12:52 PM
 
905 posts, read 769,479 times
Reputation: 1213

Advertisements

I agree with you Mutiny, which I tend to do (seriously, I love your posts). But what you said of Charleston is also true of Washington until the late 1950’s.

 
Old 01-16-2019, 12:59 PM
 
806 posts, read 295,569 times
Reputation: 812
On the notion of DC being Southern, it really depends on what you are looking at. It was undoubtedly at its most Southern in the antebellum period. The popular notion of the South and DC has diverged quite a bit since then to the point they are barely recognizable as anything beyond distantly related. Geographically remains its strongest case, but then I think Delaware even gets a geographic nod for being Southern according to the Census, so yeah. But to each their own.

As far as Maryland, I’m unsure it’s been Southern since Lincoln encircled Baltimore with cannons. Being on the wrong side of the Baptist line and not doing bbq for ship doesn’t help. But if it makes you feel better to call it Southern, go ahead. The rest of the country will not.
 
Old 01-16-2019, 01:01 PM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,450,839 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
I agree with you Mutiny, which I tend to do (seriously, I love your posts). But what you said of Charleston is also true of Washington until the late 1950’s.
Washington wasn't a big landing spot for immigrants either, not in the way Philly, NYC, Boston, or even Baltimore were, so I definitely agree with you there. DC had immigrant communities but they weren't all that big since DC doesn't have a history of industry like the actual mid-Atlantic/Northern port cities. I think one of the biggest indicators of DC's--and Baltimore's--status as border cities is the fact that both had large native Black populations before the mid-20th century AND they were also big magnets for Blacks from points south during the Great Migration.

And I appreciate the compliment and I can say the same for your posts.
 
Old 01-16-2019, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
110 posts, read 41,834 times
Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Washington wasn't a big landing spot for immigrants either, not in the way Philly, NYC, Boston, or even Baltimore were, so I definitely agree with you there. DC had immigrant communities but they weren't all that big since DC doesn't have a history of industry like the actual mid-Atlantic/Northern port cities. I think one of the biggest indicators of DC's--and Baltimore's--status as border cities is the fact that both had large native Black populations before the mid-20th century AND they were also big magnets for Blacks from points south during the Great Migration.

And I appreciate the compliment and I can say the same for your posts.
I agree. Most immigrants in the Mid-Atlantic region went to Richmond and Baltimore. Especially Jewish immigrants. Historically, Richmond had the forth highest Jewish population in the country. This was even higher than Baltimore. Richmond still has a larger jewish population than New Orleans today.

Richmond and Virginia have always been very industrial. This was the main attraction for immigrants in the area. Historically, Virginia has had more industry than all of the south combined. Most of this industry was in Richmond. While Birmingham did stand out as an industrial powerhouse, it was not all that comparable to Richmond. Baltimore is a good comparison though. Especially in terms of industry.

https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/richmond
ISJL - Virginia Richmond Encyclopedia - Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life

Last edited by Magicstar1; 01-16-2019 at 02:33 PM..
 
Old 01-16-2019, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,876 posts, read 3,002,451 times
Reputation: 3409
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
They're already part of the south.
They are? I'm from Texas, I never thought they were a part of the south. Most of Virginia, sure.
 
Old 01-16-2019, 03:24 PM
 
1,513 posts, read 529,607 times
Reputation: 1129
Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelTerritory View Post
See attached. Is this a good (rough) map of the South-- Upper and Deep. Upper in orange and Deep in red.
Wait, so Austin and San Antonio are too far West to be Southern?
 
Old 01-16-2019, 03:54 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,749 posts, read 6,162,756 times
Reputation: 3601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
They are? I'm from Texas, I never thought they were a part of the south. Most of Virginia, sure.
You learn something new everyday I guess.
 
Old 01-16-2019, 04:14 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,828,779 times
Reputation: 11141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Charleston? Not really. I mean it had more than most with its early reputation for religious tolerance (eg, French Huguenots) and one of the first Jewish communities in the South, but not much beyond that. New Orleans is the best example of a city with large amounts of immigrants early on in what is now considered the traditional South.
Savannah drew a lot of Irish immigrants in the 1800s and into the early 1900s.
 
Old 01-17-2019, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,876 posts, read 3,002,451 times
Reputation: 3409
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
You learn something new everyday I guess.
What did I learn?
 
Old 01-17-2019, 12:49 PM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,450,839 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Savannah drew a lot of Irish immigrants in the 1800s and into the early 1900s.
I'm aware. That's why it has such a big St. Patrick's Day parade. But New Orleans and Baltimore were easily the top landing spots for immigrants in the South during that era.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top