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Old 01-11-2019, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,853 posts, read 6,524,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
For LA

San Fernando Valley - “the Valley”
South Bay - southern beach cities
San Gabriel Valley - Pasadena to Claremont
Inland Empire - Riverside, San Bernardino
Orange County - Disneyland and beaches
SE County/Long Beach area - longe beach, Lakewood, Cerritos
East side - between LA and the IE but south of SGV
Westside - Santa Monica, etc
I would have to agree with the way you organized LA by blurring the distinction between city and suburb as no US has such a blurred distinction as Los Angeles.

Thus places like BH and WH are pure LA, even though they are their own municipalities because their stretch of the basin is pure LA. SFV on the orther hand, removed from the city by the Hollywood Hills, comes across as suburbia, even though the majority of it is part of LA

I think it would be virtually impossible to divide LA into city and suburban divisions.
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Old 01-11-2019, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
This is usually called the "Gateway Cities" region; i.e. Bell, South Gate, Maywood, Paramount, Bellflower, Downey, La Mirada etc
Some of those like paramount and bellflower I associate more with Long Beach. I’ve heard Metro call it “Gateway” but do people that live there? I’ve never heard anyone say that.

But I meant more north like Alhambra, Monterrey Park, Rosemead, etc. along the 60 and 10. What would you call that?
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Old 01-11-2019, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,924 posts, read 6,850,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
Some of those like paramount and bellflower I associate more with Long Beach. I’ve heard Metro call it “Gateway” but do people that live there? I’ve never heard anyone say that.

But I meant more north like Alhambra, Monterrey Park, Rosemead, etc. along the 60 and 10. What would you call that?
Really, anything east of the 710 AND northeast of Whittier Blvd is more or less in the San Gabriel Valley
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Really, anything east of the 710 AND northeast of Whittier Blvd is more or less in the San Gabriel Valley
Thanks. I didn’t know that.
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
Thanks. I didn’t know that.
When on the 605 northbound in Pico Rivera, a bit north of Whittier Blvd, there is a sign that says "entering San Gabriel Valley" even
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
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Houston- well the city has annexed much of the earlier burbs but theirs still distinct regions.

The Islanders- no one calls it this but this is basically Bellaire/West University Place/Southside Place (35,000) which has its own more urban more politically liberal vibes and Memorial Villages- 6 different small towns of about a couple thousand each (20,000 people total). Together at 55,000 this is probably Houston’s “answer” to the Main Line. A bunch of rich suburbs in a line going away from the core of Houston.
Greater Katy- the reason why I put this suburb alone isn’t because I live here but because when talking this area I mean specifically Katy, Fulshear, future development in Brookshire and Northern Richmond which all have a massive connection to the Energy Corridor this area has around 400,000-500,000 people it’s a tri-county region

Sugar Land/Fort Bend- Essentially like Fort Bend ISD this area grew independently of Katy’s Fort Bend growth and even though it will connect with Katy in the future, it is and was its own area and what most people associated with Fort Bend County. Communities here would be Missouri City/ Sienna Plantation/ Mission Bend/ Fresno/ Four Corners/ Southern Richmond/Pecan Grove/ Meadows Place/ Fifth Street/Stafford/ Rosenberg. Very diverse with rosenberg being kind of likely the “Ethno-burb” for Hispanic people, Missouri City being the ethnoburb for African Americans and Dugar Land bruh am ethnoburb for Asians. Needless to say this is the most diverse part of suburban Houston.
300,000-400,000 people

Cypress- Cy-Fair district outside of Houston as well as Jersey Village. This area is disjointed, and although I live directly south of here don’t really know much about je vibe of this area, it’s like Katy but no one really talks about it, unlike Katy though it isn’t really isolated and directly borders Houston which in itself just adds to the confusion. The area is also very integrated due to a bunch of small neighborhooods not under any city.
500,000

North Houston/The Woodlans- this is basically the areas of I-45 north of Aldine. Spring/ Tomball/ The Woodlands/ Conroe/ Klein. This is the only area of Houston where three suburbs of 100,000+ people, are back to back. Spring- The Woodlands- Conroe. Woodlands- Conroe this is area is so far from Houston that I’m not even sure if it should have been joined with Spring in the first place. This along with- Sugar Land and Katy are the three prime areas of Houston suburb wise. The Woodlands, not including the Energy Corridor
500,000-600,000

Humble-Atascocita- would include Kingwood but that is in city limits of Houston because these towns were annexed around. Mostly older suburbs to the NE which is part of the east side that myriad a mile every time North or West Houston grows 5 miles. This area feels like it hasn’t changed in a decade or two.
100,000-200,000 (closer to 300,000 if you include Kingwood)

Baytown-Pasadena- includes Crosby, Galena Park, Deer Park, Pasadena, Baytown, Cloverleaf, Jacinto City, South Houston. Basically towns around the Ship Channel. I would call this area historic Houston, these areas used to be the two biggest suburb, and besides being heavily Hispanic, and having the San Jacinto monument this area is again a look into the past, when the East Side was were the biggest suburbs were.
400,000-500,000

League City-Pearland- although Pearland and League City might seem completely different. So far they have two things in common they both give of a coastal vibe with Pearland being on the Gulf freeway and always being affected by Hurricanes. They also have two different economic focuses that doesn’t have to do with oil or blue-collar work. Medical Center and NASA. This area involves, Freindswood, El Lago, Webster, Seabrook, Kemah (Would also include Clear Lake and Southern Pasadena if Clear Lake wasn’t part of the city of Houston mostly.
300,000-400,000.

Last but not least would be Galveston. Basically Galveston island to Bacliff, Texas City/Dickinson/La Marque: San Leon.
Basically a bunch of old towns and cities that were significantly more important in the past but is a little more than just another area of Houston now.
Approaching 200,000.

Last edited by NigerianNightmare; 01-11-2019 at 05:51 PM..
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:56 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
What are the geographic areas that make up your city's suburban area. What distinguishing characteristics do these areas have?

For example:

• New York: Long Island, Westchester, New Jersey

• Chicago: North Shore, North Suburbs, Northwest suburbs, West suburbs, Fox Valley, Southwest suburbs, South suburbs, NW IN

• San Francisco (for this...not so much suburbs but Bay Area regions): The Peninsula, Silicon Valley/San Jose, Oakland and the East Bay, Marin, Wine Country
I really don't know what you're getting at with this. You don't say anything about these groups.

Denver: North, south, east, west.

The northeast suburbs are more middle-income with some low income areas, more Hispanic (Adams County as a whole is 40% Hispanic, 50.1% Non-Hispanic white), tends to vote more Democratic. The northwest suburbs are typical suburbia. Jefferson County, on the west side of Denver, runs north-south. Some of the northern Jeffco burbs are among the older suburbs, older residents.

East suburbs: Mostly Aurora. Also more middle-income to low income. Largest African-American community in the metro, including Denver proper.

Southern suburbs: generally more conservative.

Western suburbs: Jefferson County, described above. Includes the unincorporated town of Evergreen in the foothils. Close in Jeffco typical suburbia. Some older burbs close to the city, e.g. Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood. Home of the Coors brewery in Golden.
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:53 PM
 
3,048 posts, read 1,796,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Topper, did you even read what you quoted of my words where I actually wrote that in the Bay Area, these regions are not really suburbs. You managed in one short quote to completely negate what you were trying to assert?

Of course, there would be no Silicon Valley if there had been no Stanford, so I think technicalLy that makes San Jose a suburb of Palo Alto, the genises of Silicon Valley. San Jose really is in the shaddow of Palo Alto in technology.....just like San Jose is in the shaddow of East Lansing in Spartan Stadims.

But cheer up, Topper, San Jose will become the greatest city in California.....as soon as Sarah Winchester adds a 100 more rooms to her house.

Chicago actually is considered a suburb of Milwaukee, so you are really wrong on that one. Milwaukee is a great city...we’re proud to be its suburb.

Always love your input, Topper: it’s priceless.
SJ has absolutely nothing to do with SF, P.A is a suburb of San Jose, period. Simple as that. SJ is a true world class and one of the most dynamic cities in the world.
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Old 01-11-2019, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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Seattle, being a small, but dense city logistically, has a tremendous number of suburbs.

The Eastside: (east of Lake Washington) Bellevue, Kirkland, Redmond, Woodinville, Mercer Island, Issaquah, Sammamish

Snohomish County: (north) Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood, Edmonds, Bothell, Mill Creek, (Everett, an established old city).

The Southend: Renton, Burien, SeaTac, Tukwila, Kent, Des Moines, Auburn, Federal Way

Kitsap County: (west) Bremerton, Gig Harbor, Port Orchard, Poulsbo,

Pierce County: Tacoma, an established old city, Puyallup, Lakewood, Dupont,

Last edited by pnwguy2; 01-12-2019 at 12:18 AM..
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Old 01-12-2019, 03:51 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,853 posts, read 6,524,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the topper View Post
SJ has absolutely nothing to do with SF, P.A is a suburb of San Jose, period. Simple as that. SJ is a true world class...... cities in the world.
Remove the "cl" and you may be on to something, topper.
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