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Old 01-16-2019, 09:06 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,130 posts, read 9,899,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
What are the geographic areas that make up your city's suburban area. What distinguishing characteristics do these areas have?

For example:

ē New York: Long Island, Westchester, New Jersey

ē Chicago: North Shore, North Suburbs, Northwest suburbs, West suburbs, Fox Valley, Southwest suburbs, South suburbs, NW IN

ē San Francisco (for this...not so much suburbs but Bay Area regions): The Peninsula, Silicon Valley/San Jose, Oakland and the East Bay, Marin, Wine Country
The New York City metro area is larger then that.

By Region
Southwest - Central New Jersey
West - North Jersey
North - Lower Hudson Valley
Northeast - southwestern Connecticut
East - Long Island

By Railroad
NJ Transit - New Jersey
Metro-North - Hudson Valley and Connecticut
LIRR - Long Island
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Old 01-19-2019, 09:30 AM
 
1,712 posts, read 1,940,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
The New York City metro area is larger then that.

By Region
Southwest - Central New Jersey
West - North Jersey
North - Lower Hudson Valley
Northeast - southwestern Connecticut
East - Long Island

By Railroad
NJ Transit - New Jersey
Metro-North - Hudson Valley and Connecticut
LIRR - Long Island

I generally divide the NYC suburbs this way:
- Long Island (Nassau and Suffolk)
- North Jersey (I lump Rockland and "Central Jersey" in with North Jersey)
- Metro North suburbs (Westchester, SW Connecticut, Putnam).
- Staten Island (not technically a suburb since apart of NYC).

Metro North: This is unofficially regarded by most to be the most-desirable suburban region of NYC and its average home values reflect this. Generally offers the best and smoothest train commute to NYC. Known for its highly educated liberal populace, old money and preppiness. Mostly suburban but has some amazing urban areas like White Plains and New Rochelle.

Long Island: Known for being consistently suburban with very few areas that can be considered urban. Its pretty much just endless middle class/upper middle class suburban sprawl with some mega-rich areas on the north shore. Has very nice beaches and is home to the famous Hamptons. Has a very strong "Keeping up with the Joneses" mentality so people really make sure to keep their homes nice and updated. Even the least-desirable areas on LI are mostly filled with middle class homeowners who keep up with their homes. By far has the worst traffic among all of the suburban regions. LIRR train is extremely pricey and the commute can be extremely long depending on how far you are on the island. Leaving LI can very very hard due to the traffic and tolls so many ppl have become very insular where they rarely (if ever) leave the island.

North Jersey: Known for being a mix of suburban, urban and even rural areas. Many areas are nice while many areas are extremely impoverished; clearly has the highest economic inequality among all of the NYC suburban regions. Its geographically the closest suburban region to Manhattan so accessibility is good. Offers the most affordable housing options out of all of the suburban regions but is still expensive.

Staten Island: Known for Italian-Americans in super-flashy homes. Huge population of police officers, firefighters and other blue collar types. Heavily Republican.

Last edited by MemoryMaker; 01-19-2019 at 10:18 AM..
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:50 AM
 
904 posts, read 911,862 times
Reputation: 799
Quote:
Originally Posted by MemoryMaker View Post
I generally divide the NYC suburbs this way:
- Long Island (Nassau and Suffolk)
- North Jersey (I lump Rockland and "Central Jersey" in with North Jersey)
- Metro North suburbs (Westchester, SW Connecticut, Putnam).
- Staten Island (not technically a suburb since apart of NYC).

Metro North: This is unofficially regarded by most to be the most-desirable suburban region of NYC and its average home values reflect this. Generally offers the best and smoothest train commute to NYC. Known for its highly educated liberal populace, old money and preppiness. Mostly suburban but has some amazing urban areas like White Plains and New Rochelle.

Long Island: Known for being consistently suburban with very few areas that can be considered urban. Its pretty much just endless middle class/upper middle class suburban sprawl with some mega-rich areas on the north shore. Has very nice beaches and is home to the famous Hamptons. Has a very strong "Keeping up with the Joneses" mentality so people really make sure to keep their homes nice and updated. Even the least-desirable areas on LI are mostly filled with middle class homeowners who keep up with their homes. By far has the worst traffic among all of the suburban regions. LIRR train is extremely pricey and the commute can be extremely long depending on how far you are on the island. Leaving LI can very very hard due to the traffic and tolls so many ppl have become very insular where they rarely (if ever) leave the island.

North Jersey: Known for being a mix of suburban, urban and even rural areas. Many areas are nice while many areas are extremely impoverished; clearly has the highest economic inequality among all of the NYC suburban regions. Its geographically the closest suburban region to Manhattan so accessibility is good. Offers the most affordable housing options out of all of the suburban regions but is still expensive.

Staten Island: Known for Italian-Americans in super-flashy homes. Huge population of police officers, firefighters and other blue collar types. Heavily Republican.
I feel that people really underestimate State Island's diversity. Its not all Italians in big homes.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,193 posts, read 1,295,467 times
Reputation: 2045
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I’ve never heard anyone say metro South. Like there is a hole between the South Coast, South Shore and Metro West. Maybe Greater Brockton (that’s what the RTA down there is)

Same thing with Cambridge, Watertown, Arlington, Belmont, Somerville and Medford region between the Merrimack Valley, North Shore, Boston proper and Metrowest.
Brockton has a Metro South office in its downtown. A few towns around there have begun using Metro South. Places like Milton are not South Shore really.

Metro South and Metro North are the inner ring suburbs north and south of Boston, they’re not really on the shore and have much more diverse populations than what is thought of as North Shore or South Shore, usually have MBTA Access. Chelsea Everett Malden Revere Medford would all be considered metro North. That area is heavily Hispanic and with their diversity in there as well. Used to be an Italian area. Milton Stoughton Sharon Norwood Randolph Brockton are all Metro South towns with noticeable and growing black populations. You can google it-the terms get some usage. Metro South Chamber of Commerce, Mosquito Patrol of Metro South, 26th annual Taste of Metro South, Metro South Housing Court, Metro South Insurance Agency. Metro North Career Centers, Metro House Regional Housing Executive Board, YMCA Of Metro North, This is all just on the first page of google results...

Last edited by BostonBornMassMade; 01-19-2019 at 11:28 AM..
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,193 posts, read 1,295,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 908Boi View Post
I feel that people really underestimate State Island's diversity. Its not all Italians in big homes.
People do this with all suburbs. Especially Boomer and older. Most of the suburbs were listing on this thread have majority-minority populations amongst the millennials and younger generations. Yet people still like to say thing like

so and so: Irish
so and so: polish
place x: Italian

When in reality thatís more of the historical view point looking at at least the 90s and back of not the 70s... rather than acknowledging the diversity of metropolitan suburbs in 2019. This is because itís hard for some Americans to accept or really just ubderstand and digest the diversity of suburbs nowadays there no mental map for it. It kind of cringeworthy.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,193 posts, read 1,295,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
Baltimore's suburbs

Northwest (Pikesville, Owings Mills, Garrison)- Jewish and/or WASPY along the I-795 corridor, becoming rural in Carroll County with a somewhat more relaxed atmosphere
North (Towson, Ruxton, Timonium, Hunt Valley)- White collar professionals
Northeast (Perry Hall, Carney, Parkville, Harford County)- Very middle class and diverse
East (Dundalk, Middle River, Essex)- Blue collar workers, "old school" Baltimore
Inner south (Glen Burnie, Brooklyn Park)- Similar to east, but less white and a bit more politically liberal, some white flight close to the city limits
Outer south (north central Anne Arundel county)- Middle to upper middle class, liberal
Southwest (Howard county, Arbutus, parts of Catonsville, northwest Anne Arundel county)- DC influence, very liberal and diverse
West (Randallstown, Woodlawn, Lochearn, parts of Catonsville)- Asian, with some black mixed in

Unlike a lot of the city, the suburbs remain pretty steady as far as growth and development for the time being.
Iíve moved to Baltimore recently I would say Eest is pretty black with some Asian and white mixed in. East has a good number of Latinos and lack. North west is Middle Class White with some middle class black. And Inner South is grungy with pretty noticeable signs of significance. white flight. I didnít know about the politics of Southwest. I saw a big trump sign near the guineas brewery and figured it leaned republican.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:53 AM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,532,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Brockton has a Metro South office in its downtown. A few towns around there have begun using Metro South. Places like Milton are not South Shore really.

Metro South and Metro North are the inner ring suburbs north and south of Boston, theyíre not really on the shore and have much more diverse populations than what is thought of as North Shore or South Shore, usually have MBTA Access. Chelsea Everett Malden Revere Medford would all be considered metro North. That area is heavily Hispanic and with their diversity in there as well. Used to be an Italian area. Milton Stoughton Sharon Norwood Randolph Brockton are all Metro South towns with noticeable and growing black populations. You can google it-the terms get some usage. Metro South Chamber of Commerce, Mosquito Patrol of Metro South, 26th annual Taste of Metro South, Metro South Housing Court, Metro South Insurance Agency. Metro North Career Centers, Metro House Regional Housing Executive Board, YMCA Of Metro North, This is all just on the first page of google results...
I would consider everything on the east side of the Mystic the North Shore though. So Everett, Chelsea, Revere, and certainly Lynn would be North Shore.
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Old 01-20-2019, 06:15 AM
 
3,559 posts, read 1,187,224 times
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Atlanta is basically:

*North of I-20 or Northside (Alpharetta, Woodstock, Marietta, Norcross, Cumming)

*South of I-20 or Southside (Newnan, Union City, Peachtree City, Morrow, McDonough)

I-20 corridor (Douglasville, Lithonia, Conyers, Convington)
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Old 01-20-2019, 09:02 PM
 
386 posts, read 101,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Chicagoan here, and here's how I perceive the characteristics of the regions you listed:

- North Shore: educated, rich, more progressive (as opposed to union-Democrat), whites are mostly Anglo-Saxon

- (Inner ring) west and north suburbs: large black and Hispanic communities but very racially balkanized (besides OP/FP), ranges from working-class (Maywood, Bellwood) to affluent (OP/RF, La Grange, Western Springs), most densely populated region outside the city (street grid with houses and apartments on small lots, few to no subdivisions), left-leaning

- Lake County/NW Cook County (north/NW suburbs): extravagant WASP wealth dotted by some more working-class white/Hispanic towns (Waukegan, the Round Lakes, etc.) and, at its northern fringes, some borderline-rural communities (Fox Lake, Antioch) that may not identify much with Chicagoland, leans somewhat liberal

- McHenry County (NW suburbs): a similar dynamic, but less of the WASP wealth and more of the rural parts, somewhat conservative

- DuPage County (west suburbs): also very WASP and wealthy, traditionally religious-right (cf. Wheaton College) but now moving leftward as more educated lakefront Chicagoans have moved in, contains a lot of corporate headquarters (clustered in the Itasca/Schaumburg area and Oak Brook) as well as numerous malls and shopping centers

- Fox Valley: more visibly Rust Belt (very old buildings, many in states of decay, traditional street grids), large Hispanic community that coexists peacefully with whites

- SW suburbs: more conservative (but still only moderate overall), mostly white-ethnic, more insular

- south suburbs: economically depressed, large black population (and growing, as blacks flee the city's South Side), currently undergoing white flight

- NW Indiana - industrial, lots of ex-Illinois-side Chicagoland natives who fled across the border for a lower cost of living, more conservative, starkly divided between violent towns (Gary, E. Chicago, parts of Hammond) and safe, quiet ones that maintain a rural character



You're overestimating the population of WASPs in Chicagoland. There are far more Catholics than WASPs. Just because they're white and rich doesnt make them WASPs. Plenty of them are Catholic
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Old 01-21-2019, 05:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,982 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Pittsburgh

Suburbs generally thought of as divided by North, South, East and West.


South Hills: dense streetcar suburbs closer to the city. generic suburban and highrise apt suburbs further out

North Hills: a few dense streetcar suburbs closer in, newer housing further out. Pricier areas of Pittsburgh suburbs are here. Further out still are newer booming areas like Cranberry Township, generally thought of as generic and soulless, lol.

West: a few dense streetcar suburbs closer in, newer housing further out

East: some denser edge cities like Wilkinsburg, otherwise mostly generic suburbia from the 1950s-1980s. Some old-school mafia towns like New Kensington.

Mon Valley: depressed mill towns that have been struggling for a long time and are still struggling


An unusual point about many Pittsburgh suburbs, is that they are full of apartment towers, something you usually only see a lot of in larger metros. I did a thread on it
Midrise towers in the Pittsburgh suburbs
Good descriptions. I'd like to add, as you go farther west from Pittsburgh, into Beaver County, you find depressed mill towns along the Ohio and Beaver Rivers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
People do this with all suburbs. Especially Boomer and older. Most of the suburbs were listing on this thread have majority-minority populations amongst the millennials and younger generations. Yet people still like to say thing like

so and so: Irish
so and so: polish
place x: Italian


When in reality thatís more of the historical view point looking at at least the 90s and back of not the 70s... rather than acknowledging the diversity of metropolitan suburbs in 2019. This is because itís hard for some Americans to accept or really just ubderstand and digest the diversity of suburbs nowadays there no mental map for it. It kind of cringeworthy.
Actually, not so much out west here. Not such a focus on one's "nationality".
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