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Old 01-21-2019, 06:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
People do this with all suburbs. Especially Boomer and older. Most of the suburbs were listing on this thread have majority-minority populations amongst the millennials and younger generations. Yet people still like to say thing like

so and so: Irish
so and so: polish
place x: Italian

When in reality thatís more of the historical view point looking at at least the 90s and back of not the 70s... rather than acknowledging the diversity of metropolitan suburbs in 2019. This is because itís hard for some Americans to accept or really just ubderstand and digest the diversity of suburbs nowadays there no mental map for it. It kind of cringeworthy.
I mean you do see a lot more Greek Pizza and a lot less Portuguese/Brazilian places North of boston vs South of Boston although itís not like there are hard borders
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Old 01-22-2019, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Boston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I would consider everything on the east side of the Mystic the North Shore though. So Everett, Chelsea, Revere, and certainly Lynn would be North Shore.
Maybe only Lynn and Revere would be North Shore... but honestly, Revere fits my personal idea of Metro North 100%. Chelsea and Everett touch Boston that not North Shore at all, they have no business being lumped with Hamilton, Amesbury, Rowley etc.
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Old 01-22-2019, 12:08 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
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Beaches: The communities closest to downtown on the coast and south of La Jolla; Pt. Loma, Ocean Beach, Mission Beach and Pacific Beach

Coronado: Sleepy Military retirement village across the bay from the city. It’s an isthmus not an island regardless of its ‘Isle’ moniker.

La Jolla: Wealthy beautiful coastal enclave, complete with its ‘village’ designation - they like to think of themselves as actually in a different city but they’re not.

North County Coastal: Above La Jolla to Camp Pendleton, close to the ocean (obviously) but what is considered ‘coastal’ depends on who you are talking to though. Includes Rancho Sante Fe and nearby communities and municipalities from Encinitas to Oceanside.

North County Inland: everywhere else unlucky enough not to be included in the ‘coastal’ designation out to the foothills, mostly suburban communities and cities. Fallbrook, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, San Marcos and Escondido.

East County: Rural and Redneck, spreads north and south to encompass far reaches of North County mountains and South Bay foothills, smaller cities and ranchland. El Cajon, Santee, Ramona, Warner Springs

South Bay: South of the city to Tijuana from the coast and Chula Vista.

Mountains: Julian and its environs. Sometimes considered part of East County but has its own identity. Tiny touristy towns for snow, wineries and apples.

Deserts: Joshua Tree, Borrego Springs. Very sparsely populated.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Chicagoan here, and here's how I perceive the characteristics of the regions you listed:

- North Shore: educated, rich, more progressive (as opposed to union-Democrat), whites are mostly Anglo-Saxon

- (Inner ring) west and north suburbs: large black and Hispanic communities but very racially balkanized (besides OP/FP), ranges from working-class (Maywood, Bellwood) to affluent (OP/RF, La Grange, Western Springs), most densely populated region outside the city (street grid with houses and apartments on small lots, few to no subdivisions), left-leaning

- Lake County/NW Cook County (north/NW suburbs): extravagant WASP wealth dotted by some more working-class white/Hispanic towns (Waukegan, the Round Lakes, etc.) and, at its northern fringes, some borderline-rural communities (Fox Lake, Antioch) that may not identify much with Chicagoland, leans somewhat liberal

- McHenry County (NW suburbs): a similar dynamic, but less of the WASP wealth and more of the rural parts, somewhat conservative

- DuPage County (west suburbs): also very WASP and wealthy, traditionally religious-right (cf. Wheaton College) but now moving leftward as more educated lakefront Chicagoans have moved in, contains a lot of corporate headquarters (clustered in the Itasca/Schaumburg area and Oak Brook) as well as numerous malls and shopping centers

- Fox Valley: more visibly Rust Belt (very old buildings, many in states of decay, traditional street grids), large Hispanic community that coexists peacefully with whites

- SW suburbs: more conservative (but still only moderate overall), mostly white-ethnic, more insular

- south suburbs: economically depressed, large black population (and growing, as blacks flee the city's South Side), currently undergoing white flight

- NW Indiana - industrial, lots of ex-Illinois-side Chicagoland natives who fled across the border for a lower cost of living, more conservative, starkly divided between violent towns (Gary, E. Chicago, parts of Hammond) and safe, quiet ones that maintain a rural character
Agreed with most of these thoughts about Chicagoland. Very diverse area.
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Old 01-26-2019, 12:11 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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New Orleans Suburbs

1. Metairie/Kenner - the original suburbs, Metairie is immediately adjacent to the city limits of NO. Traditionally middle class, becoming more downscale following the flight of former residents to the Northshore and the influx of people from the city and illegal immigrants, but still a respectable part of town

2. Chalmette/Arabi/Luling/a lot of the Westbank - traditional blue collar suburbs, majority white working class

3. Northshore (St. Tammany parish, Covington, Mandeville, some would include Slidell) - The wealthiest part of Greater New Orleans. Lots of modern, new suburban developments. Traditional rural aspects mixed with suburbia and NO culture. Culturally a mix of traditional Americana and Creole influences from the city. Grown significantly after the construction of the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway and Hurricane Katrina. Northshore is above sea level and is safer from both hurricanes/floods and crime. St. Tammany is the wealthiest and one of the fastest growing parishes in the entire state of Louisiana.

4. Hammond/Ponchatoula - Rural, small town charm. Independent areas but now officially part of the NO metro area. Getting transplants from both New Orleans and Baton Rouge, with close ties to both the Northshore and to some of Baton Rouge's suburbs like Denham Springs and Walker. Traditional small town/rural living, laid back. Traditional Southern culture with many Creole influences from the city, but not as strong as in the Northshore. Of these 4 regions, this is the one that's much more good ol fashioned USA vs the classic New Orleans vibe.

All of these are culturally and politically distinct from the city of NO. Metairie would be the one most similar to New Orleans. All of these suburbs are conservative (Republicans usually win all the suburban parishes) while the city is very liberal. Some hardcore natives from the city don't like to claim St. Tammany Parish, Hammond, or Ponchatoula as part of the New Orleans region.
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Old 01-26-2019, 12:20 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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Baltimore suburbs

1. Dundalk/Essex/Middle River/Rosedale (eastern Baltimore County) - traditional white working class communities, hit hard by unfair trade agreements as manufacturing plants have shut down en masse. Traditional Trump country though not as socially conservative as the Deep South. Demographically, culturally and economically more like the Rust Belt.

2. Woodlawn/Reisterstown - predominantly black working class suburbs (but not ghetto)

3. Howard County - wealthy, suburban liberal elites, plastic suburbia (this is the ultimate "planned community" especially Columbia though there's some old charm left in Ellicott City

4. Owings Mills/Pikeville - predominantly Jewish area, home of the Jewish elite

5. Carroll and Harford Counties - mix of rural and suburbia, increasingly suburban. Conservative, your mix of the pickup truck rebel flag kind of Republican with the gated community/SUV kind of Republican. Mostly white and Christian. If I HAD to live in Maryland again this is where I would live. Many people moved here to escape the city of Baltimore and the inner suburbs as crime, the ghetto exodus, and illegal immigration have increased.

6. Anne Arundel County - nice living by the Bay, laid back vibe. Annapolis is technically part of the Baltimore metro area. Despite the good life you're still in Maryland and subject to state policies like high taxes and overregulatoin including with property rights.
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Old 01-27-2019, 12:02 PM
 
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Twin Cities...

West/Southwest - St Louis Park/Golden Valley out through Wayzata/Lake Minnetonka and Chanhassen - most affluent stretch. Edina is the only real ‘deep money’ burb in the metro.

Northwest - mix of older, less affluent inner ring and new-money sprawl (Maple Grove)

North - Inner ring has some nice areas (St Anthony and Roseville) but northern exurbs considered more blue collar/rural

Northeast - Lake and River Towns (WBL/Stillwater) and some open farmland still

East - newer money (Woodbury) and large lot/rural/hobby farm

Southeast - Family-centric commuter suburbs

South - upper-middle suburban sprawl down the 35 W/E corridor. Inner ring (Bloomington/Richfield) post/war suburbs.
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Old 01-27-2019, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,853 posts, read 6,524,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
Twin Cities...

West/Southwest - St Louis Park/Golden Valley out through Wayzata/Lake Minnetonka and Chanhassen - most affluent stretch. Edina is the only real Ďdeep moneyí burb in the metro.

Northwest - mix of older, less affluent inner ring and new-money sprawl (Maple Grove)

North - Inner ring has some nice areas (St Anthony and Roseville) but northern exurbs considered more blue collar/rural

Northeast - Lake and River Towns (WBL/Stillwater) and some open farmland still

East - newer money (Woodbury) and large lot/rural/hobby farm

Southeast - Family-centric commuter suburbs

South - upper-middle suburban sprawl down the 35 W/E corridor. Inner ring (Bloomington/Richfield) post/war suburbs.
How about the parts of Wisconsin directly across the St. Croix? Arenít they considered a part of the Twin Cities metro?
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Old 01-27-2019, 03:40 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,123,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
How about the parts of Wisconsin directly across the St. Croix? Arenít they considered a part of the Twin Cities metro?
Yes. But they arenít really Ďsuburbaní per se. There are cute river towns (Hudson, Prescott, Hastings) but once you get only a few miles east of the river itís fairly rural. Some beautiful state parks along the St Croix river
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