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Old 02-28-2019, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
55 posts, read 24,393 times
Reputation: 119

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Visited Texas Hill country for the first time last week and I gotta say; coming from California, the hills surrounding Austin and San Antonio weren’t that awe-ing or and lacked wow factor. For a Texan who stayed around flat Houston and Dallas I can see why i’d be scenic and possibly even the most amazing nature they’ve seen in their early lifes’.

Most of the time the hills are so small that the dense tall trees hide the distant views of giving the illusion of being in the middle of a valley. You wouldn’t even know the elevation changed until you feel your automobile needing more acceleration in certain roads.
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Old 02-28-2019, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,960 posts, read 4,324,779 times
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Dallas does have some hilly areas. Especially in SW Dallas County.
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Old 02-28-2019, 09:09 PM
 
Location: San Diego
34,928 posts, read 31,961,540 times
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Every part of the US has it's own plus. I'm from CO moved to CA and while breath taking some of that you can't even hike because it's brutal and vertical. Texas has it's own appeal, that's why so many people are moving there.
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Old 02-28-2019, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,523 posts, read 10,194,145 times
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The Hill Country, like the "mountains" of Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas, is just ok. I like the Driftless Area of Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, and Iowa more. Similar topography, but way more lush.
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Old 02-28-2019, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
17,999 posts, read 22,732,087 times
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I grew up in the SF Bay Area. Right out of high school, I moved to WA, right between Mt. Adams and Mt. Helens.

I then moved to Seattle near Mt. Rainier, then to Bellingham, close to Mt. Baker.

Then, I moved to Nashville, TN, and had to giggle when people called the area around even Gatlinburg - mountains.

Even here in the SF Bay Area, though, people call the what I would call "hills" - mountains - the coastal range, etc.

Have you seen the movie with Hugh Grant titled, "The Englishman who climbed up a hill and came down a mountain"? It's on topic, because there is a small town that is adamant that their local hill is, in fact, a mountain by definition as to elevation. When they discover it's short of the definition of "mountain" by something like 30 feet, they quickly scramble to add a bunch of dirt to it, so it will qualify.

Anyway, people for some reason take personal pride in calling their local hills, etc., - mountains. It's a matter of pride for some.

Doesn't really matter as far as enjoying them one way or another. Just silly human stuff.

I've been to Austin, and I never thought of there being anything close to being defined as a mountain around that area. Some hills, maybe, but no mountains.
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Old 02-28-2019, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,093 posts, read 4,700,776 times
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I grew up in and still love the Appalachians.

I got lucky in that I can find the beauty in any natural setting. I have my preferences, but nature is gorgeous no matter where you go.

I will never understand how superior height and grade makes people ignore or even flat out dislike smaller mountains or hills. It's all beautiful! Whether it's a 15,000 foot mountain or a 400 foot hill.
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Old 03-01-2019, 03:33 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,201 posts, read 9,441,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maximalist View Post
Visited Texas Hill country for the first time last week and I gotta say; coming from California, the hills surrounding Austin and San Antonio weren’t that awe-ing or and lacked wow factor. For a Texan who stayed around flat Houston and Dallas I can see why i’d be scenic and possibly even the most amazing nature they’ve seen in their early lifes’.

Most of the time the hills are so small that the dense tall trees hide the distant views of giving the illusion of being in the middle of a valley. You wouldn’t even know the elevation changed until you feel your automobile needing more acceleration in certain roads.
The Hill country is a joke as far as mountainous as is all "mountains" in the eastern USA. The Hill country is at least more interesting landscape than the rest of Texas so it stands out given its location.

Mt. Rainier, now that's a mountain.
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Old 03-01-2019, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,260 posts, read 54,969,343 times
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We sound a bit snobby about this dont we?

About Austin, is it the Himalayas? No but it's nice for what it is.
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Old 03-01-2019, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,201 posts, read 9,441,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
We sound a bit snobby about this dont we?

About Austin, is it the Himalayas? No but it's nice for what it is.
Not snobbish, just factual. I took a trip through Austria and Switzerland last September....really beautiful country and yes, those Swiss mountains are impressive though I guess I was let down a bit after they had been played up in my mind over years.
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Old 03-01-2019, 07:35 AM
 
1,803 posts, read 1,229,349 times
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I don't think anyone claims the hill country is suppose to be mountain.

I disagree with it being the most interesting landscape of Texas after finally visiting. I like the great plains and the forests of east Texas just as much. The landscape out towards and around El Paso are, for me, the state's most interesting landscape.
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