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Old 04-24-2019, 01:12 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
925 posts, read 396,871 times
Reputation: 454

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I live in NJ and lived here my whole life. I always wanted to leave here, but some of my "cons" about NJ did play a role in my childhood though.

1. Nor'easters / too much snow: Miss school! Excuses to not go to certain things I don't want to go to.

2. Dynamic weather: If it rains suddenly, an event I don't want to go to gets cancelled!

3. Crowded: I loved growing up in crowded in NJ, because if I wanted to sneak out of my house and drive somewhere quickly, I could do it. NJ has so many conveniences within a 5 minute drive. McDonald's, Starbucks, etc. are really close to home! That's pretty much a reason why people like NJ. Most states in the US that are NJ or CA usually require rural driving to get to the nearest convenience.
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,310 posts, read 633,242 times
Reputation: 1663
I'm probably unusual in that my active desire from a young age to leave where I grew up (Chicago area) was not because I disliked the lifestyle there - wanting more space, less liberal politics, or whatever. It was because I really didn't want to live in the same place my whole life - I viewed that as a sign of a failure to launch and a hamper on my personal growth, and it seemed like a huge missed opportunity to not experience life elsewhere. So I exclusively looked at colleges in other states (ended up going to school in Ohio), and then as soon as I graduated and came home, only looked for jobs in other states until I found one. In retrospect, my views on people who never leave home are much less negative now, but I still think that I personally have benefited greatly from it.

In general, though, I like the lifestyle of the Chicago area. I do think the intense segregation is a concern, although all cities deal with this to varying degrees. I also sort of wish Illinois had more of a cohesive identity, or at least that downstate Illinois did (as, say, upstate NY does) apart from just hating Chicago.
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,179 posts, read 35,738,628 times
Reputation: 62429
I lived in 10 states and 2 countries during my childhood but I can say that I liked just about everything about every place I can remember.

I spent 6 very formative years in the Chesapeake Bay area (and them lived there again for several years as an adult, and then one of my daughters moved there) and I have to say it's my favorite region to this day. I like the south and southeast a lot too.
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Old 04-24-2019, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,201 posts, read 5,416,642 times
Reputation: 4562
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
I also sort of wish Illinois had more of a cohesive identity, or at least that downstate Illinois did (as, say, upstate NY does) apart from just hating Chicago.
It does, but most who have lived their lives in Chicagoland and havenít spent much time downstate donít really know it, unless they went to Illinois. In fact, most actually like (yes, like!) Chicago. For the majority of the population in downstate (central IL), the culture and identity are basically what you see across most of Iowa, Indiana, and to a certain extent parts of Wisconsin and Michigan: more rural and agrarian in many small towns, much greater affinity to outdoors, hunting, fishing, owning and working land, and several small cities that are basically generic Midwestern dotted with interspersed with college towns.
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Old 04-24-2019, 04:07 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
8,739 posts, read 3,991,375 times
Reputation: 7452
Moved to Oklahoma City when I was 13 and my childhood went from happy to miserable. I was bullied in OKC and also my dad became very abusive around that time. We also got involved in a heavily fundamentalist church that some consider to be a cult. I'm now 33 and everywhere I go in this town it's like there are ghosts reminding me of negative aspects of my upbringing. I moved away for a few years after college and thought I could move back but when I did, all those negative emotions came back. I'm certain this plays a major role in why I hate this city so much now and am desperate to escape (other than the fact I simply don't like the city or its culture).
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Old 04-24-2019, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,310 posts, read 633,242 times
Reputation: 1663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
It does, but most who have lived their lives in Chicagoland and havenít spent much time downstate donít really know it, unless they went to Illinois. In fact, most actually like (yes, like!) Chicago. For the majority of the population in downstate (central IL), the culture and identity are basically what you see across most of Iowa, Indiana, and to a certain extent parts of Wisconsin and Michigan: more rural and agrarian in many small towns, much greater affinity to outdoors, hunting, fishing, owning and working land, and several small cities that are basically generic Midwestern dotted with interspersed with college towns.
I know, I've been all over Illinois - granted, I haven't spent more than a day or so in any one place. But I think in, say, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the UP of Michigan, there is a strong sense of what it means to be from that state and not from other Midwestern states - I feel less of that with Illinois.
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Old 04-24-2019, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,217 posts, read 24,272,238 times
Reputation: 12896
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I live in NJ and lived here my whole life. I always wanted to leave here, but some of my "cons" about NJ did play a role in my childhood though.

1. Nor'easters / too much snow: Miss school! Excuses to not go to certain things I don't want to go to.

2. Dynamic weather: If it rains suddenly, an event I don't want to go to gets cancelled!

3. Crowded: I loved growing up in crowded in NJ, because if I wanted to sneak out of my house and drive somewhere quickly, I could do it. NJ has so many conveniences within a 5 minute drive. McDonald's, Starbucks, etc. are really close to home! That's pretty much a reason why people like NJ. Most states in the US that are NJ or CA usually require rural driving to get to the nearest convenience.
I lived in CA from birth until age 23. I spent my summers in WA from age 5-15.

I knew very early on that I wasn't going to stay in CA forever. I think even waiting until 23 to leave for good was too long.

-I never saw a snowflake fall from the sky, let alone experienced a snow day. We'd have indoor recess on rainy or windy (Santa Ana winds) days. Snow was that stuff you could see on the mountains, and if you were lucky enough, your parents/family would take you there to play in it (I myself only got to go twice ).

-The biggest deterrent to going to events was traffic. Everything in SoCal is based around traffic patterns. You want to go to Staples Center for a game/show at 7pm? Oh, you live in the IE? Leave by 4pm if you want to get there on time, and even then...

The biggest things that I miss about CA are as follows:
-the FOOD. Namely the Mexican food and/or fast food. It's done right there, and nowhere else (IMO).
-I miss some aspects of the weather, I miss the overall culture, I miss the palm trees, and some of the landscape.

Contributing factors for wanting to leave:
-cost of living
-traffic
-lack of variety in weather
-the overemphasis on achieving greater affluence, and the lengths people will go to advertise their own real or imagined affluence
-I had been confined to low-class areas during my upbringing in CA; and the area in WA I stayed in was upper-middle class, which gave me a possibly over-inflated opinion of overall life there

tl;dr, I'm glad I left, and am at least half-glad I grew up there.

OP, your #3 bullet point isn't uncommon at all. I can be to the grocery store, drug store, Walmart, a dozen fast food joints, gas, car wash, bank, and most anything else within 5-10 minutes. I don't think I've ever lived anywhere where that wasn't the case.
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Old 04-24-2019, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
26,695 posts, read 5,647,539 times
Reputation: 29836
No...

I consider my home state to be behind in education when I was young....
likely now too.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
5,855 posts, read 6,266,402 times
Reputation: 12410
My dad was in the military so I never really had a childhood state until we came back to Ohio, and since then my area has changed for the worse, it was nice 45 years ago, now not so much.

Best place I ever lived was Ilvesheim Germany, worst was Granada Hills CA.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,160 posts, read 2,610,159 times
Reputation: 2167
I wouldn't say I currently dislike my childhood and current state, Colorado, but I am very grateful I grew up there. I'm grateful I grew up on a house with 5 acres in Black Forest just north of CO Springs, where I could always go outside and play around or enjoy the nature and daydream. I think it really did help me developmentally to create my own fun, appreciate nature, and be active. I think I went to pretty good schools with great teachers and I liked our neighbours and the North CO Springs area. I think the ability to always have some outdoor rec activity really helped glue our family together despite big religious, work, and interest differences between my parents. It was something we all enjoyed.

I don't think this upbringing was necessarily unique to Colorado though. Over half the nation from what I can gather has good public land and outdoor rec options and the ability to get into nature.

Moving to Denver opened my eyes into how much more difficult it is to get outside and enjoy the simple activities of nature in a big metropolis vs a smaller city. I spend a lot more weekday evenings inside here just cause it's always an effort to drive far enough to get into a natural setting. Parks are nice, but even the parks are really crowded here. Other people always around and talking makes it hard to unwind. That's one major reason why I'm hesitant to put roots down in a big metro.

My issue with CO is I don't know if I'll be able to replicate what I had growing up to my potential future family as the front range is increasingly built to capacity. I don't want to be stuck on the eastern edge of the front range cities always commuting in or in a condo type lifestyle with a family.
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