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Old 06-01-2019, 10:40 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,095 posts, read 488,980 times
Reputation: 498

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https://www.northjersey.com/story/ne...ys/2027152002/

I saw a Reddit post once about how NJ has the highest percentage of young adults 18-34 living at home. I did a Google search on that and found the following link I pasted above. It has a list of states by percentage of young adults living at home. Top being the highest.

Notice how the "rich people states" appear on the upper part of the list. NJ, CT, NY, CA, and MD are what I consider "rich people states". Based on my experience on living in NJ, I can't even find an internship in the IT field and I even struggled to find retail jobs in NJ one summer, I am not even kidding. In NJ, to get a job or an internship in your field, you need to be "prestigious" and have a decade of experience to even land one. For a real job in NJ, employers around NJ seems to be arrogant and they just don't want to pay enough to employees to cover cost of living, which is why young adults cannot live in NJ on their own.

Now, the reason why most young adults in NJ live at home is because they LIKE their parents to death and they LOVE NJ to death, while people like me DON'T like their parents and I have a desire to leave NJ and leave the parents I live with.

I always dreamed of living in the PNW, but notice how Washington and Oregon appear more on the bottom area of the list. Isn't that a good thing? Landing a job in the PNW should be easier.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:00 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,220 posts, read 10,130,376 times
Reputation: 6580
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
https://www.northjersey.com/story/ne...ys/2027152002/

I saw a Reddit post once about how NJ has the highest percentage of young adults 18-34 living at home. I did a Google search on that and found the following link I pasted above. It has a list of states by percentage of young adults living at home. Top being the highest.

Notice how the "rich people states" appear on the upper part of the list. NJ, CT, NY, CA, and MD are what I consider "rich people states". Based on my experience on living in NJ, I can't even find an internship in the IT field and I even struggled to find retail jobs in NJ one summer, I am not even kidding. In NJ, to get a job or an internship in your field, you need to be "prestigious" and have a decade of experience to even land one. For a real job in NJ, employers around NJ seems to be arrogant and they just don't want to pay enough to employees to cover cost of living, which is why young adults cannot live in NJ on their own.

Now, the reason why most young adults in NJ live at home is because they LIKE their parents to death and they LOVE NJ to death, while people like me DON'T like their parents and I have a desire to leave NJ and leave the parents I live with.

I always dreamed of living in the PNW, but notice how Washington and Oregon appear more on the bottom area of the list. Isn't that a good thing? Landing a job in the PNW should be easier.
You are making an excellent point.

The more expensive an area, it is harder for young people to get their feet off the ground. Leaving aside higher taxes, bad one party politics and higher cost of living, the more populated an area is often means higher housing costs. Supply and demand.

Case in point, while I love the New York City area and especially Long Island (IMHO there is a much better QOL in Suffolk versus NYC), I only live here now because my family and friends are here. Knowing what I know now, I would not move here from elsewhere and I would not move somewhere similar say like northern New Jersey or southern California. Its just not worth it.

Having said that, I do understand the city lovers who absolutely want to be in or near cities like New York, Boston or San Francisco. To each his own.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:07 PM
 
4,810 posts, read 2,929,999 times
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Seattle is very high for the percentage having roommates -- I've heard it's #1 by some measure.

Roommate situations are probably more popular in cities a lot of 20-somethings move to vs. having parents in.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,071 posts, read 700,098 times
Reputation: 2204
So, how would you explain the high percentage of young adults who still live at home in Rhode Island, which has a significantly lower cost-of-living than either Connecticut or New Jersey?

In my perspective, there are ethnic undertones to those statistics. For the record, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island have the highest percentages of self-reported Italian and Irish ancestry of all U. S. states. In other words, there is a high concentration of people in southern New England and the Mid-Atlantic who heavily trend Roman Catholic.

For anyone from other religious traditions who may be unfamiliar, the Roman Catholic Church condemn premarital cohabitation as a mortal sin and, as a result, strongly discourage the practice among adherents. This is particularly true among the "old-school" Roman Catholics that are common throughout much of the northeastern United States.

Although California has a high percentage of Roman Catholics, that is not the primary reason why so many young adults still live at home there. As a state, California is home to very large populations of Asians and Hispanics, who more often than not reside in multigenerational households. In Asia and Latin America, it is quite common for grandparents, parents and children/grandchildren to reside in the same home.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:44 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,220 posts, read 10,130,376 times
Reputation: 6580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
So, how do you make the case for the high percentage of young adults who still live at home in Rhode Island, which has a significantly lower cost-of-living than either Connecticut or New Jersey?

In my perspective, there are ethnic undertones to those statistics. For the record, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island have the highest percentages of self-reported Italian and Irish ancestry of all U. S. states. In other words, there is a high concentration of people in southern New England and the Mid-Atlantic who heavily trend Roman Catholic.

For anyone from other religious traditions who may be unfamiliar, Roman Catholics condemn premarital cohabitation as a mortal sin and, as a result, strongly discourage the practice among adherents. This is particularly true among the "old-school" Roman Catholics that are common throughout much of the northeastern United States.

Although California has a high percentage of Roman Catholics, that is not the primary reason why so many young adults still live at home there. As a state, California is home to very large populations of Asians and Hispanics, who more often than not reside in multigenerational households.
That is probably a good point that certain groups might be more willing to live together as extended families then others.

I could be wrong but I believe that Rhode Island is a typical Northeast state with more expensive then average housing costs and higher taxes. Its harder to afford a mortgage when more of your money is going to taxes, especially high real estates taxes.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:46 PM
 
7,974 posts, read 4,846,406 times
Reputation: 8726
States don’t matter.
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