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View Poll Results: Does the Midwest get short changed on people's perceptions of it?
Yes 29 70.73%
No 12 29.27%
Voters: 41. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Yesterday, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,519 posts, read 2,660,865 times
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Meh, I drove along Milwaukee's lakefront twice a day and am quite content. If other people don't appreciate our beauty that's on them.

The Midwest's biggest hurdle is it's geography. Our beauty is along the perimeters or in Michigan which one has to intend to drive into. Our beauty isn't along the highways cutting the quickest route through the middle. Americans overall are so geographically challenged and lazy that they don't bother to stop and learn about a new area if it doesn't smack them in the face.

I'd take Michigan's beaches over most beaches in the South any day. My kids were completely disinterested in Navarre Beach, FL and only lasted an hour (without ever getting in the water) before asking to leave.
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Old Yesterday, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
45 posts, read 7,051 times
Reputation: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
I consider that fair. We have nothing "jaw dropping" in our landscape. The closest jaw dropping place to the midwest would be Niagara Falls. So nothing in our region at all. If I looked at California and was asked if each of the following constitutes "jaw dropping": Yosemite, Tahoe, Big Sur, the redwoods, the Monterey Peninsula...I'd say yes on every score.

I think it comes down to this: you can get fantastic scenery in the midwest but we do not have any of the ultimate type of locations you can find in other regions.
The South Dakota Badlands are jaw dropping. They look like the west but are carved out of the prairie. The problem is that they are far away from everything so they are hard to get to and people forget they exist. If they were near a major city it would be one of the most famous places in America.

Some photos I took:

Badlands 16 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands 03 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands 05 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands Rain by Somnifor, on Flickr
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Old Yesterday, 06:20 PM
 
2,221 posts, read 1,116,880 times
Reputation: 2847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somnifor View Post
The South Dakota Badlands are jaw dropping. They look like the west but are carved out of the prairie. The problem is that they are far away from everything so they are hard to get to and people forget they exist. If they were near a major city it would be one of the most famous places in America.

Some photos I took:

Badlands 16 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands 03 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands 05 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands Rain by Somnifor, on Flickr
The Badlands are amazing. Honestly, it's too bad for those who refuse to lower themselves to go somewhere in the Midwest. I laugh at them....honestly, people like that are pathetic. Your photos are beautiful.
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Old Yesterday, 07:58 PM
 
954 posts, read 358,262 times
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The Badlands are beautiful, and certainly get spillover from Mount Rushmore. Though on that note, I’m not sure many people would concede that as the Midwest. Partly for prejudices, but partly for practical reasons. It’s a Mountain time zone location that most people access from Denver and Cheyenne rather than Lincoln or Minneapolis. South Dakota straddles two regions in that regards.
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Old Yesterday, 08:00 PM
 
2,221 posts, read 1,116,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
The Badlands are beautiful, and certainly get spillover from Mount Rushmore. Though on that note, I’m not sure many people would concede that as the Midwest. Partly for prejudices, but partly for practical reasons. It’s a Mountain time zone location that most people access from Denver and Cheyenne rather than Lincoln or Minneapolis.
It's the Midwest. It's not something one has to concede...it is what it is.
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Old Yesterday, 08:27 PM
 
954 posts, read 358,262 times
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And the American portion of the Chihuahuan Desert is mostly in the South. Still it’s not something most people would concede as Southern.
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Old Yesterday, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,270 posts, read 2,712,714 times
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There's portions of the Midwest that are underrated, but not the entire area. I don't think any of it would classify as overrated either.

Part of the problem is there's just a large swath that's eaten up by corn and soybean which isn't scenic. It's Iowa's, Illinois's, and Kansas's own problem for not setting aside more public land that they get the reputation they do. These states could be prettier if they wanted to.

States like South Dakota and Minnesota and Wisconsin are fairly rated, a lot of people visit western SD and people know about the lakeside homes of MN. The great lakes and Driftless areas are cool, but the words out and a lot of people live and visit there. My extended family works on Madeline Island and they can't build fast enough for all the people who want to be there.

The Northwoods of MN and WI get praised on here a lot, but it's not some undiscovered scenic mecca IMO. It's big timber country that's heavily logged (I believe WI has passed up Oregon for timber production), it's swampy with a LOT of mosquitoes and ticks, and the weathers pretty harsh. It's got lakes, but how many of those does a person need, and all those lakes breed mosquitoes and ticks. And there's just more tree varieties further south.

I'd only put Nebraska and Missouri as underrated state wide. Nebraska has a terrible reputation for scenery (thanks I-80...) but the sandhills are real cool and it's got a lot of the stuff SD has, just on a less grand scale. It's better than KS and 4 steps above eastern CO IMO. Missouri has a lot of rolling hill forest land and big reservoirs, doesn't seem to have the same bug problem as other places, and is more 'temperate'. Ohio would be underrated too, but Appalachia is eastern US in my book.
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Old Yesterday, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
45 posts, read 7,051 times
Reputation: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
The Badlands are beautiful, and certainly get spillover from Mount Rushmore. Though on that note, I’m not sure many people would concede that as the Midwest. Partly for prejudices, but partly for practical reasons. It’s a Mountain time zone location that most people access from Denver and Cheyenne rather than Lincoln or Minneapolis. South Dakota straddles two regions in that regards.
The Badlands are surrounded by prairie. This is the road to the park entrance:

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.9832...7i13312!8i6656

Looks like the Midwest to me.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,853 posts, read 9,230,622 times
Reputation: 11446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somnifor View Post
The South Dakota Badlands are jaw dropping. They look like the west but are carved out of the prairie. The problem is that they are far away from everything so they are hard to get to and people forget they exist. If they were near a major city it would be one of the most famous places in America.

Some photos I took:

Badlands 16 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands 03 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands 05 by Somnifor, on Flickr

Badlands Rain by Somnifor, on Flickr
The North Dakota badlands in Theodore Roosevelt National Park are also stunning and even more overlooked since they aren't on the way to Mount Rushmore.
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Old Yesterday, 09:58 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,853 posts, read 9,230,622 times
Reputation: 11446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
There's portions of the Midwest that are underrated, but not the entire area. I don't think any of it would classify as overrated either.

Part of the problem is there's just a large swath that's eaten up by corn and soybean which isn't scenic. It's Iowa's, Illinois's, and Kansas's own problem for not setting aside more public land that they get the reputation they do. These states could be prettier if they wanted to.

States like South Dakota and Minnesota and Wisconsin are fairly rated, a lot of people visit western SD and people know about the lakeside homes of MN. The great lakes and Driftless areas are cool, but the words out and a lot of people live and visit there. My extended family works on Madeline Island and they can't build fast enough for all the people who want to be there.

The Northwoods of MN and WI get praised on here a lot, but it's not some undiscovered scenic mecca IMO. It's big timber country that's heavily logged (I believe WI has passed up Oregon for timber production), it's swampy with a LOT of mosquitoes and ticks, and the weathers pretty harsh. It's got lakes, but how many of those does a person need, and all those lakes breed mosquitoes and ticks. And there's just more tree varieties further south.

I'd only put Nebraska and Missouri as underrated state wide. Nebraska has a terrible reputation for scenery (thanks I-80...) but the sandhills are real cool and it's got a lot of the stuff SD has, just on a less grand scale. It's better than KS and 4 steps above eastern CO IMO. Missouri has a lot of rolling hill forest land and big reservoirs, doesn't seem to have the same bug problem as other places, and is more 'temperate'. Ohio would be underrated too, but Appalachia is eastern US in my book.
What gets me is people in Iowa saying Nebraska is ugly. It looks the friggin same!
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