U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Today, 11:30 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,035 posts, read 457,077 times
Reputation: 477

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
I think people leech off their parents until they're about 40 virtually everywhere in the U.S.
I wouldn't say 40, but based on responses to Reddit posts like, "What age did you move out?", the oldest I've heard of is 34, so I'd people probably leech off their parents until 34. 18-34 is the age range used in the statistics of "young adults living at home".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Today, 11:38 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,035 posts, read 457,077 times
Reputation: 477
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
What's love got to do with it? You find a job, get a roommate if you have to and move out. In the 1970s I stayed at home until about 23 then found a roommate (school friend from 4th grade) with a similar situation. My gross pay was well under $450 a month and his was about the same so we managed -- rent was only about $130 for 2 bedrooms in a four-plex, bugs included. Car payments, gas, food, utilities, and other stuff ate up the rest of the money. It was a pay as you go world for the most part. That salary sounds crazy but it would be almost $30K gross per year today. That rent would be $800 in today's money.

It's different today but the plan should still work for many young people. Today the dollar numbers are a lot higher and there are many economic and financial barriers getting in the way for some. School loans are crippling young people and the jobs are not what was expected or not where they live. The dynamics of entry-level job seeking is a bit different now. In some parts of government, these are often contract workers with little security and few benefits. There's a lot of competition for jobs in the private sector in some places and not in other spots. Being mobile helps. Parents can drive you crazy but so can your boss or coworkers so suck it up. I've seen a few cases where a young person is so precious that they won't take the job that is available and would rather live at home until they get the job they want. There is something to be said for experience and a solid work record even if it is not the desired job.
I know, the whole love thing is overrated. This is America, you don't need marriage to move out.

And yeah I would take any good-ish job with a bad boss and suck it up in order to get away from living with my parents, tbh. You can always look for an even better job once you move out.

My brother hates our parents too, but he is not taking all the good opportunities outside NJ, but he does have a 6 figure salary job here in NJ (it's a job that's even better than his major) and he still lives at home at 25, when he could easily afford NJ rent. I just don't get young people (young New Jerseyans mainly) sometimes. I feel like I am going to be the only successful 22 year old New Jerseyan making the smart choice of moving the hell out of the state to a place that has freakin' jobs for Christ sake and maybe a lower cost of living place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:40 AM
 
9,859 posts, read 13,707,118 times
Reputation: 5962
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
NJ has the highest number of young adults living at home where that statistically counts as age 18-34, but when I am asking about this, I am talking about any age past 23. The traditional American concept is that you move out at 22 or 23 once you graduate college, but no later than that.

It frustrates me to hear that many people in NJ and outside NJ move out later than 23, because I really don't like living with my parents anymore and I feel like I am the only person that is not madly in love with my parents.

Yeah this is a high cost of living state, but every successful younh adult had a superior resume, drives an expensive car (mainly old people drive expensive cars here), and there are no jobs out here unless you were a Baby Boomer where jobs were easier to get in NJ's old days, so now seondary cities are the new "Millennial trend"/ "Gen Z trend".

It seems like every person my age group who was born and grown in NJ loves their parents to death and has no problem living with them forever so they wouldn't have to pay bills (like my brother's friends), while people like me never liked my parents at all and I have no desire to live home after 23. I am 21, senior in college, and have a lot saved up, I want a job out West and to be out of here right after this school year ends. I feel like I am the only person that never liked my parents (and my state too).

Throughout American history, the West was always a "transplant" friendly place where people move

Where you live, do young adults these days "love their parents to death" and how common is it for them to be living on their own?
Not from NJ, but from LI, so similar when it comes to COL etc etc.


I lived with parents til 26. It's common here to live with them until one's 30's even. I love my parents to death too, but you can love your parents and still want to be on your own.


Many people who move out right after college, especially in areas like ours, struggle. I liked living with my parents and banking almost all my paychecks. Bought a house @ 26. Living with them allowed me to do that.


But no, I could not live there forever. Eventually I moved out when I felt financially secure enough.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:43 AM
 
18,034 posts, read 4,323,797 times
Reputation: 5793
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
Texas got a lot of jobs (but white collared) depending on which part.

If I was super disabled, like on a wheelchair, then I would be fine living with my parents forever. Sadly, I can only get McJobs in NJ, because you have to have the most prestigious resume to get a job here and that's why most people in NJ drive BMWs as the standard cars here or luxury cars (I'm not even kidding).

If I love physical labor, life would be so much easier with the job hunt since America needs more blue collared workers.
well im not super disabled im not in a wheelchair......i just have a life threatening condition that makes work difficult if im able to do it at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:46 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,035 posts, read 457,077 times
Reputation: 477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Not from NJ, but from LI, so similar when it comes to COL etc etc.


I lived with parents til 26. It's common here to live with them until one's 30's even. I love my parents to death too, but you can love your parents and still want to be on your own.


Many people who move out right after college, especially in areas like ours, struggle. I liked living with my parents and banking almost all my paychecks. Bought a house @ 26. Living with them allowed me to do that.


But no, I could not live there forever. Eventually I moved out when I felt financially secure enough.

I don't like that concept, so I am moving the hell out of the NYC area, because I am depressed as hell with how many people love their parents to death here and live with them forever.

Unfortunately, I won't have the opportunity to buy a house right away, because I need to rent out of state in places I haven't visited enough or have not visited in.

If I loved NJ and my parents, I would have easily bought a house here at 26, but I don't like those two things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:48 AM
 
9,859 posts, read 13,707,118 times
Reputation: 5962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Citykid3785 View Post
Most people that live with their parents beyond 22, even though they may love them very much, are typically doing it out of not being clear on what they want out of life yet. They haven't met a life partner, are still figuring out their career, and might be paying off school debt. In other words, it's somewhat independent of their love for their parents. Even if you dearly love your parents, at some point you're going to be bothered by some of their ways if you are an adult living in close quarters.
That's not true.


I had a job @ 22 and paid all my bills. I knew what I wanted. I lived with my parents so that I could buy a house and not be stuck renting (why pay someone else's mortgage instead of my own?)


Many people who live with their parents have the mindset I did. I was extremely ambitious so I could bank as much $$ as I could to buy property
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:50 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,035 posts, read 457,077 times
Reputation: 477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
That's not true.


I had a job @ 22 and paid all my bills. I knew what I wanted. I lived with my parents so that I could buy a house and not be stuck renting (why pay someone else's mortgage instead of my own?)


Many people who live with their parents have the mindset I did. I was extremely ambitious so I could bank as much $$ as I could to buy property
Yeah I agree with you and that's what Jdawg8181 did too. If someone loves their parents to death, then go for it and live with them to save up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:53 AM
 
9,859 posts, read 13,707,118 times
Reputation: 5962
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I don't like that concept, so I am moving the hell out of the NYC area, because I am depressed as hell with how many people love their parents to death here and live with them forever.

Unfortunately, I won't have the opportunity to buy a house right away, because I need to rent out of state in places I haven't visited enough or have not visited in.

If I loved NJ and my parents, I would have easily bought a house here at 26, but I don't like those two things.
How does other people living with their parents effect you though?


Do you & let them do them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:55 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,035 posts, read 457,077 times
Reputation: 477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
How does other people living with their parents effect you though?


Do you & let them do them.
Because I am worried I won't ever make it out of NJ and my parents' house due to living costs around the country being too high. I never hear about anyone moving at 22 or 23. People either move out at 18 or way or older than 23.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:58 AM
 
9,859 posts, read 13,707,118 times
Reputation: 5962
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
Because I am worried I won't ever make it out of NJ and my parents' house due to living costs around the country being too high. I never hear about anyone moving at 22 or 23. People either move out at 18 or way or older than 23.
I know a lot of ppl who moved out @ 22.


They are in their 40's now and still don't own anything.


Not that there is anything wrong with renting, but you are basically paying someone else's mortgage for them
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top