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Old 09-26-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,041 posts, read 465,769 times
Reputation: 477

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VietInKC View Post
I know Pharmacy is experiencing hard times and saturation but pretty much all fields I would think are experiencing these hard times as well bar computer sciences, biotech, technology, engineering, what have you. I don't mind my parents so I'm in a different situation.
If you don't mind living with your parents, then good for you! I also assume they are way better than traditional Asian parents. I recommend saving the money and not paying your own bills. I wouldn't blame somebody if they are mooching off their parents, but save money, but if you want, do what my brother's friend did and work at McDonald's or some kind of minimum wage job (a fun one at least) to save money for when your parents actually do die.
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Old 09-26-2019, 08:03 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,207 posts, read 10,070,089 times
Reputation: 6544
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
NJ has the highest number of young adults living at home where that statistically counts as age 18-34, but when I am asking about this, I am talking about any age past 23. The traditional American concept is that you move out at 22 or 23 once you graduate college, but no later than that.

It frustrates me to hear that many people in NJ and outside NJ move out later than 23, because I really don't like living with my parents anymore and I feel like I am the only person that is not madly in love with my parents.

Yeah this is a high cost of living state, but every successful younh adult had a superior resume, drives an expensive car (mainly old people drive expensive cars here), and there are no jobs out here unless you were a Baby Boomer where jobs were easier to get in NJ's old days, so now seondary cities are the new "Millennial trend"/ "Gen Z trend".

It seems like every person my age group who was born and grown in NJ loves their parents to death and has no problem living with them forever so they wouldn't have to pay bills (like my brother's friends), while people like me never liked my parents at all and I have no desire to live home after 23. I am 21, senior in college, and have a lot saved up, I want a job out West and to be out of here right after this school year ends. I feel like I am the only person that never liked my parents (and my state too).

Throughout American history, the West was always a "transplant" friendly place where people move

Where you live, do young adults these days "love their parents to death" and how common is it for them to be living on their own?
Long Island is probably like New Jersey on a smaller scale.

Here on Long Island it is extremely common for young people to live with their parents deep into their 20s. There is virtually no stigma at all, in fact I would say it is actually considered normal.

That is probably because Long Island is very expensive and there is a shortage of apartments. Virtually the only kids that can move out at 18 are either going to college (and they will usually be back home after they graduate) or going into the military which is fairly rare on the Island.

Normally the first step I see that young people do is they sometimes team up jointly to pay the rent for an apartment. Otherwise they might not be able to move out at all.
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Old 09-28-2019, 10:48 AM
 
826 posts, read 1,083,618 times
Reputation: 1050
There's really not the stigma that there once was to it.

Yes - most parents would like their kids to be independent and "move out", but we also know that it costs money to pay for your things. So, we are willing to support having our kids under our roof, if they are doing something to work towards having an independent future. (school, job, saving for an apartment/house)

On the other hand, I find that a lot of people really aren't grateful that they have families that care about them and are willing to help them out after they reach adulthood.....age 18. Some people really don't have that luxury and it is a huge struggle for them to find stability in the lives because of it. I was never very grateful that I had family until I met my husband. Even though my family was poor, there were plenty of times when having my family saved me because they were there and they cared. My husband got kicked out his house as a teenager and didn't have a senior year of high school. I didn't meet his parents until after we got married (years after we got married). Then, I understood why he didn't want anything to do with his parents. It was just really sad because my family, for all their faults, was really just supportive of me. This was the opposite. I understood why he values his independence and hard work and perseverance so fiercely after that.

I can see it from both sides because I'm not that far removed from my 20's (I still remember my friends and I struggling into our 30's), but we've had conversations about our son going into young adulthood in a few years and what that would look like for him and our family.

The people who moved back home had career instability or there was a major health issue in the family and extra help was needed at home. "All hands were needed on deck!"
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Old Today, 08:48 AM
 
18,084 posts, read 4,351,119 times
Reputation: 5842
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
NJ has the highest number of young adults living at home where that statistically counts as age 18-34, but when I am asking about this, I am talking about any age past 23. The traditional American concept is that you move out at 22 or 23 once you graduate college, but no later than that.

It frustrates me to hear that many people in NJ and outside NJ move out later than 23, because I really don't like living with my parents anymore and I feel like I am the only person that is not madly in love with my parents.

Yeah this is a high cost of living state, but every successful younh adult had a superior resume, drives an expensive car (mainly old people drive expensive cars here), and there are no jobs out here unless you were a Baby Boomer where jobs were easier to get in NJ's old days, so now seondary cities are the new "Millennial trend"/ "Gen Z trend".

It seems like every person my age group who was born and grown in NJ loves their parents to death and has no problem living with them forever so they wouldn't have to pay bills (like my brother's friends), while people like me never liked my parents at all and I have no desire to live home after 23. I am 21, senior in college, and have a lot saved up, I want a job out West and to be out of here right after this school year ends. I feel like I am the only person that never liked my parents (and my state too).

Throughout American history, the West was always a "transplant" friendly place where people move

Where you live, do young adults these days "love their parents to death" and how common is it for them to be living on their own?
I think its more due to financial and economic reasons than love for one's parents.
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