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Old 09-23-2019, 02:17 PM
 
5 posts, read 565 times
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Looking at places to move after I graduate. I would be working in software or game development, most likely at a startup. Looking for a place that has a strong industry in these fields. Other than that I would like it to be close to nature for hiking, backpacking, biking, swimming. For the city, I would like good public transportation/walkability/biking as I probably won't have a car. I would also want things to do like museums, art galleries, bookstores, historical sites, cool architecture, and interesting lectures to attend. For weather I would like a place not too hot, preferably with four seasons.

For the people I would like people I could relate to and make friends, people with similar interests like video games, philosophy, anime, books, writing, deep conversations. I would like to meet people who are open minded and open to new ideas and discussing them. For politics I would like if the government or people were not at either extreme but maybe more centrist or libertarian, though I am that picky on this point. Low crime is also a plus.

I know this is all pretty specific, but just give me your best suggestion.
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Old 09-23-2019, 02:41 PM
 
9,877 posts, read 13,729,441 times
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If you can afford it, NYC of course.
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Old 09-23-2019, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
124 posts, read 59,554 times
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Seattle/Portland. Though the open-mindedness I'm not sure since these cities are close to San Francisco levels of liberalism, Portland more so.
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Old 09-23-2019, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Landrum,SC
503 posts, read 247,128 times
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Do you have a weather preference? Around Denver if you like the cold.
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:30 PM
 
57,934 posts, read 82,512,591 times
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Perhaps a “sleeper” in this regard: https://gamedaily.biz/article/506/ga...b-rochester-ny

Home - Roc Game Dev

https://workinman.com/

Darkwind Media Ltd.

Another such area and some relevant companies: https://www.techvalleygamespace.com/
https://www.albany.com/hotspot/tech-valley/
https://www.news10.com/news/capital-...e-development/

https://www.velanstudios.com/

https://www.vvisions.com/

http://wbgamesny.com/

1st Playable Productions - Games in Education - Troy NY
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:59 PM
 
23 posts, read 5,012 times
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From the sounds of it, I'd strike off the west coast. It's very liberal with little room for variance if you're in the city, and doesn't have four seasons. Plus, many of the major cities are less ideal for dating as a straight guy than on the east coast.
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Old 09-23-2019, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,727 posts, read 3,812,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halfandhalfandaquarter View Post
From the sounds of it, I'd strike off the west coast. It's very liberal with little room for variance if you're in the city, and doesn't have four seasons. Plus, many of the major cities are less ideal for dating as a straight guy than on the east coast.
All major cities are liberal especially ones with any somewhat decent PUBLIC transportation, it would be hypocritical to be a city with a good offering of public services and be centrist and especially libertarian. The idea of it in and of itself is oxymoronic. Once the OP realizes that what he wants is not possible and is a pipe dream, then the nation is his oyster.

Liberals are also, 9 times out of 10 the ones who would bike to work and have good biking infrastructure in their cities, and liberals are usually the ones who support walkable cities and density while conservatives which are still libertarians cling to their suburbs and car-centric non-walkable developments because that is literally the "traditional" style of development the US has. College towns/cities are usually liberal too (referring to the lectures bit) in addition to that.

What OP wants is essentially what everyone want these days, and OP can just follow nationwide trends. What are the most popular cities that have the OP's industry? Austin, Seattle, Denver, Portland, San Francisco, New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington DC, etc.

4 seasons? That eliminates Austin and San Francisco.
Good outdoor recreation? That eliminates the East Coast major cities.

So what's left? Denver, Portland, and Seattle from what I listed.

There are other smaller towns that may fit the bill, probably back east because if it's not a big city out West it's not going to be walkable with public transportation. They may not have jobs though.
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Old 09-23-2019, 09:14 PM
 
23 posts, read 5,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Liberals are also, 9 times out of 10 the ones who would bike to work and have good biking infrastructure in their cities, and liberals are usually the ones who support walkable cities and density while conservatives which are still libertarians cling to their suburbs and car-centric non-walkable developments because that is literally the "traditional" style of development the US has. College towns/cities are usually liberal too (referring to the lectures bit) in addition to that.



Except the NIMBY capital of the US is San Francisco, which, incidentally is the most liberal city. It's not alone. Seattle voted down a subway for multiple generations and is about as liberal as a US city can get. Portland allows a toxic glassblowing studio in a neighborhood and regularly has antifa marches.


Reality isn't as nice as it's marketed.
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Old 09-23-2019, 09:23 PM
 
4,685 posts, read 2,843,592 times
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We USED TO vote against rail. Since 1997 it's been pure yes by large margins. (Not including a monorail proposal that was voted down for other reasons) We also vote yes for buses, which move more people here than most US peer cities' combined transit systems.

Between Seattle, Porland, and Denver, Seattle has multiples of the software/gaming jobs of the other two. Though we're not really a standout with start-ups. Also about double Portland's in-city transit commute share, and three times Denver's.
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Old 09-23-2019, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,727 posts, read 3,812,039 times
Reputation: 3816
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfandhalfandaquarter View Post
Except the NIMBY capital of the US is San Francisco, which, incidentally is the most liberal city. It's not alone. Seattle voted down a subway for multiple generations and is about as liberal as a US city can get. Portland allows a toxic glassblowing studio in a neighborhood and regularly has antifa marches.


Reality isn't as nice as it's marketed.
California has the strongest case of NIMBYism and I 100% agree with you there. California's NIMBYism (that goes for all of it) is why so many Californians are mass migrating to surrounding states. Phoenix is a prime example of that.

Then people here say "Don't Californicate by Arizona" but yet support the same housing styles as others did over there which allowed California to get too expensive and make people leave in the first place. When people say that I always say, "Ok so we are going to ban single-family housing and massive sprawl that allowed California to lose land, preventing affordable housing which is why so many of them move here and continue to vote with their preferences?" I usually get crickets as a response.

NIMBYs aren't left leaning though, if you are NIMBY you cannot be any more left than a centrist, they probably claim progressive for the positives of the label but don't actually behave like one. How does the phrase go... actions speak louder than words...

Portland and Minneapolis are much more progressive than any California city as of right now, due to the fact they are basically the only two cities that have successfully fought NIMBYism.

Also all cities voted against transit for generations or fought it, even NYC (look up Robert Moses) referring back to my previous post, favoring car-centricism and suburbia which is why anyone right-leaning will prefer this "traditional" and "conservative" style of life, versus the new renaissance of urban living.

Back to the focus of the thread, OP will probably need to locate to one of those cities because that's where the industry is, the urbanism and the outdoor recreation.
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