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Old 10-15-2019, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
13,176 posts, read 9,159,601 times
Reputation: 7668

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Agreed. Multiple cities have a "midtown" or uptown or some sort of trendy district getting highrises outside the CBD....but I am ONLY INTERESTED IN AT LEAST THREE MILES FROM CITY HALL of the MSA core city.

Louisville has a proposal 3.5 miles from downtown for THREE, 350 foot scrapers....however it was recently knocked down to one, 250 foot scraper and a massive ten story building all around.

https://jeffersondevelopmentgroup.co...folio=one-park

Here is another 200 foot tower likely to break ground in Louisville soon....it's over 4 miles from city hall:

http://josephandjoseph.net/willow-grande/
The examples for Vancouver are all way over 3 miles from Vancouver City Hall.
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Old 10-15-2019, 03:09 PM
 
5,746 posts, read 6,284,434 times
Reputation: 4273
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
Cleveland/suburbs have 13 residential towers of at least 200 feet that would fit the criteria. Of those, 10 are in the suburbs, including the two tallest ... Lake Park Tower in East Cleveland that is 27 stories and 330 feet, and Crystal Tower 24 stories 270 feet, also in East Cleveland.

The tallest in the city outside of downtown is One University Circle at 233 feet and 20 stories.

Residential high rises over 200 feet by city (non-downtown):

1. Euclid (5)
2. Cleveland (3)
3. East Cleveland (2)
4. North Olmsted (2)
5. Lakewood (1)

Its shocking that Lakewood only has one since overall it has about as many high rises as all the other suburbs combined.
Cleveland is becoming more impressive by the day.
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Old 10-15-2019, 09:05 PM
 
75 posts, read 58,451 times
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Currently, the Skyhouse in Nashville's Midtown, 1 mile from downtown is the tallest at 25 floors and 289'. There is another residential building going up on West End a little further away which will be 25 floors and 299'.
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Old 10-15-2019, 09:29 PM
 
6,766 posts, read 14,016,807 times
Reputation: 3114
Quote:
Originally Posted by PHofKS View Post
Currently, the Skyhouse in Nashville's Midtown, 1 mile from downtown is the tallest at 25 floors and 289'. There is another residential building going up on West End a little further away which will be 25 floors and 299'.
Plenty of cities have these heights 1 mile from downtown, including Louisville.

What building is over 250 to 300 ft ALL RESIDENTIAL AT LEAST THREE MILES FROM CITY HALL?
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Old 10-15-2019, 09:50 PM
 
2,453 posts, read 1,214,805 times
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Here is a complete list of Louisville's tallest buildings, that indicate if they're residential. You can Google any city in the US, and Wikipedia will have a list like this, for each city. Nice for comparing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._in_Louisville
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Old 10-15-2019, 11:27 PM
 
6,766 posts, read 14,016,807 times
Reputation: 3114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Here is a complete list of Louisville's tallest buildings, that indicate if they're residential. You can Google any city in the US, and Wikipedia will have a list like this, for each city. Nice for comparing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._in_Louisville
Except its wrong, way wrong. There's several residential highrises missing. The most glaring by far is 1400 Willow.

https://www.emporis.com/buildings/12...isville-ky-usa

It's over 3 miles from downtown, and closer to 300 ft, not 262. Additionally, there's several highrises, many over 6-8 floors, which line Cherokee Park. Very few people know this about Louisville, but it's like a "baby" Central West End from STL. Probably more grandiose in ways because there is upscale neighborhoods for miles all around. This is one of the areas which make Louisville such a special city for a MSA under 2 M.

You see, that's one of the problems with you city data kids. Thinking everything can be found on google when it really can't! That wiki link you posted honestly leaves off a dozen residential highrises in Louisville, maybe more!

There's several other missing too, and I mean several. Off the top of my head Brown Suburban Condos, Icon apartment tower, and several others are over 10 stories and all residential.
This list also doesnt include several Louisville suburbs with highrises. Then there is the George Condos, at around 11 stories. How about the Glenveiw? https://www.emporis.com/buildings/13...isville-ky-usa
157 feet for the Glenview and probably 6 plus miles from city hall. And that's if Emporis height estimate is correct

Honestly Louisville has, at minimum 4-5 other buildings at least this big I cannot think of right now. Even Jeffersonville, IN has a couple.

For example, New Albany has Riverview Towers, which is at least 183ft without its spire.
https://www.emporis.com/statistics/t...-albany-in-usa
At over 5 miles from downtown, its taller than many of these cities residential as is like Albuquerque.

Here is Louisville's newest residential highrise opened this year...it isn't super tall, maybe 8 stories, but probably well north of 100 feet:

http://www.edgewateratriverpark.com/

This district will have multiple highrises on the river in a few years.

And here is yet another district of residential highrises that will start construction in the next year or so in Clarksville, IN, facing Louisville:

https://www.mkskstudios.com/projects...velopment-plan

Not a single one of these on that wiki link......

Last edited by Peter1948; 10-15-2019 at 11:48 PM..
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Baltimore - Richmond
566 posts, read 375,119 times
Reputation: 934
For Richmond, VA

William Byrd Building: 14 stories. 3.1 miles from City Hall
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5603...=en&authuser=0
https://www.emporis.com/buildings/13...ichmond-va-usa

River Towers: 15 stories, 200ft. 2.7 miles from City Hall.
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5245...=en&authuser=0
https://www.emporis.com/buildings/13...ichmond-va-usa

Imperial Plaza: 13 stories and 174ft. 7 miles from City Hall
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5871...=en&authuser=0

Hathaway Towers: 13 stories, 173ft. 6 miles from City Hall
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5397...=en&authuser=0

Stuart Court Apartments: 10 stories, 115ft. 2.5 miles from downtown
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5526...=en&authuser=0

5100 Monument, 146ft. 6 miles from City Hall
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5786...=en&authuser=0

OP, there are more but I tried to keep it in the city limits and as close to over 3 miles as possible. The thing is, for a city like Richmond(only about 60 square miles) 3 miles can be pretty far out. Like below is a neighborhood that has two 170ft towers proposed but is not in Richmond but only 2.4 miles away from City Hall:
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5162...=en&authuser=0
https://www.google.com/maps/dir/City...=en&authuser=0
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ri...=en&authuser=0
You can literally be outside of the city in 3 miles...

Last edited by mpier015; 10-16-2019 at 10:16 AM..
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Old 10-16-2019, 11:21 AM
 
2,453 posts, read 1,214,805 times
Reputation: 3121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Except its wrong, way wrong. There's several residential highrises missing. The most glaring by far is 1400 Willow.

https://www.emporis.com/buildings/12...isville-ky-usa

It's over 3 miles from downtown, and closer to 300 ft, not 262. Additionally, there's several highrises, many over 6-8 floors, which line Cherokee Park. Very few people know this about Louisville, but it's like a "baby" Central West End from STL. Probably more grandiose in ways because there is upscale neighborhoods for miles all around. This is one of the areas which make Louisville such a special city for a MSA under 2 M.

You see, that's one of the problems with you city data kids. Thinking everything can be found on google when it really can't! That wiki link you posted honestly leaves off a dozen residential highrises in Louisville, maybe more!

There's several other missing too, and I mean several. Off the top of my head Brown Suburban Condos, Icon apartment tower, and several others are over 10 stories and all residential.
This list also doesnt include several Louisville suburbs with highrises. Then there is the George Condos, at around 11 stories. How about the Glenveiw? https://www.emporis.com/buildings/13...isville-ky-usa
157 feet for the Glenview and probably 6 plus miles from city hall. And that's if Emporis height estimate is correct

Honestly Louisville has, at minimum 4-5 other buildings at least this big I cannot think of right now. Even Jeffersonville, IN has a couple.

For example, New Albany has Riverview Towers, which is at least 183ft without its spire.
https://www.emporis.com/statistics/t...-albany-in-usa
At over 5 miles from downtown, its taller than many of these cities residential as is like Albuquerque.

Here is Louisville's newest residential highrise opened this year...it isn't super tall, maybe 8 stories, but probably well north of 100 feet:

EdgeWater at RiverPark Place | Louisville, KY Luxury Condos

This district will have multiple highrises on the river in a few years.

And here is yet another district of residential highrises that will start construction in the next year or so in Clarksville, IN, facing Louisville:

https://www.mkskstudios.com/projects...velopment-plan

Not a single one of these on that wiki link......
None of these additions change anything much, though. Just rearranges middle or lower height buildings around, a little. Counting buildings that aren't built, would not apply, as every city has those.
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:58 PM
 
255 posts, read 183,077 times
Reputation: 432
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtinmemphis View Post
Cleveland is becoming more impressive by the day.
Unfortunately, 12 of the 13 were built in the 60s or 70s (and two are public housing towers ... and there is at least one, maybe a second 200 foot public housing tower I didn't count because even though not in downtown, still within 3 miles).

On the bright side, One University Circle, which was completed a couple years ago, was the first residential high rise (15 stories plus) built anywhere in Cuyahoga County since that high rise boom of the 60s and 70s. It has been followed up with the 355-foot Beacon and the 396-foot Lumen which are both under construction (both in downtown). Plus, there are a couple more in the 200 to 400 range in the works for downtown.

And there is a ton of mid-rise buildings (5 to 11 stories) that have been recently built, are under construction or are going through the approval process in Ohio City, University Circle/Little Italy, Detroit-Shoreway, Flats, so progress is being made in rebuilding the neighborhoods.
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Old 10-19-2019, 12:41 PM
 
2,704 posts, read 2,994,418 times
Reputation: 2332
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
On the bright side, One University Circle, which was completed a couple years ago, was the first residential high rise (15 stories plus) built anywhere in Cuyahoga County since that high rise boom of the 60s and 70s.
Actually Crittenden apts between the Flats East and WHD is 17 stories and was built in 1994.

Interestingly both Lakewood's Winton Place ("... tallest apt between New York and Chicago") and East Cleveland's Lake Park Tower ("... tallest apartment building in Ohio") claim local height supremacy. Which one is right?

btw, many props to Lake Park Tower for hanging in as a quality property despite the obvious and serious deterioration of its East Cleveland home around it. LPT is one of the few assets East Cleveland has and, frankly, I'm rather stunned they've been able to maintain, and still attract well-paid working professionals who want to live there. It's a bit of a fortress somewhat isolated from the rest of EC perched on the Superior Ave hillside into the Heights with those commanding Lake Erie and downtown views. The building is massive. Let's hope the building's managers keep it on the up-and-up.

... btw, East Cleveland's Crystal Tower is also maintaining quality as well... Good for them...

Last edited by TheProf; 10-19-2019 at 12:50 PM..
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