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Old 10-20-2019, 08:23 PM
 
6,766 posts, read 14,016,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Fan board classifications are subjective on any given fan board.

In terms of building codes and professional standards, heights of 75', 80', 85' etc. tend to be where requirements move to the first highrise category. That relates to what fire ladders can reach as well as other factors.
I would say at minimum 10 stories or 100 feet for this site...but anything over 150 ft is definitely a high rise for the sake of this discussion especially for your mid sized cities.

Remember, the main question I asked was to list your tallest ALL RESIDENTIAL located at least 3 miles from city hall of the core metro by GPS.

I've already demonstrated Louisville has at least a dozen or more outside that 3 mile radius that meet that criteria.
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Old 10-20-2019, 11:10 PM
 
1,124 posts, read 421,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raleighsocial View Post
The 32-story (364.5 ft) Walter Tower in Raleigh's North Hills will be the tallest residential tower in Raleigh. Currently under construction in Raleigh. It's 5 miles from Downtown. It will also be the fourth tallest building in Raleigh.
I think it’s been updated to 35 stories and closer to 390 feet. The Penney’s site will be turned into a 12-story residential tower I do believe starting sometime next year. They’ll be building out on North Hills for the next decade or so.
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Old 10-20-2019, 11:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheProf View Post
Actually Crittenden apts between the Flats East and WHD is 17 stories and was built in 1994.

Interestingly both Lakewood's Winton Place ("... tallest apt between New York and Chicago") and East Cleveland's Lake Park Tower ("... tallest apartment building in Ohio") claim local height supremacy. Which one is right?

btw, many props to Lake Park Tower for hanging in as a quality property despite the obvious and serious deterioration of its East Cleveland home around it. LPT is one of the few assets East Cleveland has and, frankly, I'm rather stunned they've been able to maintain, and still attract well-paid working professionals who want to live there. It's a bit of a fortress somewhat isolated from the rest of EC perched on the Superior Ave hillside into the Heights with those commanding Lake Erie and downtown views. The building is massive. Let's hope the building's managers keep it on the up-and-up.

... btw, East Cleveland's Crystal Tower is also maintaining quality as well... Good for them...

Winton Place has the most stories at 28, but it is listed as being shorter than both Lake Park Tower and Crystal Tower. That may be where the debate is. Btw, agree on both the East Cleveland towers holding up (I think both have been recently renovated). Some of ECs other towers definitely haven't fared as well.

Also, forgot about Crittenden Court but I was thinking 200 plus feet and its listed at 195.
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Old 10-21-2019, 12:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
I would say at minimum 10 stories or 100 feet for this site...but anything over 150 ft is definitely a high rise for the sake of this discussion especially for your mid sized cities.

Remember, the main question I asked was to list your tallest ALL RESIDENTIAL located at least 3 miles from city hall of the core metro by GPS.

I've already demonstrated Louisville has at least a dozen or more outside that 3 mile radius that meet that criteria.
Yeah, 15 stories or 150 feet is what I would consider high rise, especially for 3 million and under metros. I know someone mentioned 200 feet. I just used that for Cleveland because it has 17 over 200 feet outside of downtown (a couple I wasn't sure about if they were three miles, but are located within neighborhoods that wouldn't even be considered fringe downtown, so I only listed 13). You push it out to 150 feet or 15 stories and it goes to 40-plus buildings.

By my count, this is what you would have:

1. Cleveland (all non-downtown neighborhoods) - 14
2. Lakewood - 9
3. Euclid - 7
4. East Cleveland - 3
4. Mayfield Heights - 3
6. North Olmsted - 2
7. Bratenahl - 2
8. Willoughby Hills - 1
9. Cleveland Heights - 1

I would say anything that is between 7-14 stories or over 100 feet is mid rise, so if that is the tallest, the answer would be zero "highrises" for that metro. You'd probably be looking at 200-plus in the Cleveland area outside of downtown ... pretty much every decent sized suburb that started developing pre-1980 has at least a couple of them.
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Old 10-21-2019, 01:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
Yeah, 15 stories or 150 feet is what I would consider high rise, especially for 3 million and under metros. I know someone mentioned 200 feet. I just used that for Cleveland because it has 17 over 200 feet outside of downtown (a couple I wasn't sure about if they were three miles, but are located within neighborhoods that wouldn't even be considered fringe downtown, so I only listed 13). You push it out to 150 feet or 15 stories and it goes to 40-plus buildings.

By my count, this is what you would have:

1. Cleveland (all non-downtown neighborhoods) - 14
2. Lakewood - 9
3. Euclid - 7
4. East Cleveland - 3
4. Mayfield Heights - 3
6. North Olmsted - 2
7. Bratenahl - 2
8. Willoughby Hills - 1
9. Cleveland Heights - 1

I would say anything that is between 7-14 stories or over 100 feet is mid rise, so if that is the tallest, the answer would be zero "highrises" for that metro. You'd probably be looking at 200-plus in the Cleveland area outside of downtown ... pretty much every decent sized suburb that started developing pre-1980 has at least a couple of them.
This seems a bit high....are all these exclusively residential? Also I do believe you are counting some within 3 miles of city hall.
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Old 10-21-2019, 11:28 AM
 
255 posts, read 183,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
This seems a bit high....are all these exclusively residential? Also I do believe you are counting some within 3 miles of city hall.
That included all exclusively residential (unless you count Pier W restaurant being below Winton Place in Lakewood) that are located in non downtown, or non downtown extension neighborhoods (West of the Cuyahoga River or east of E. 55th). Of those, the four in Ohio City are within three miles of downtown. I wasn't sure about Hough so looked up Willson Tower (E. 55th and Chester) and it's 2.5 miles. The other two in Hough are at the eastern end of the neighborhood so would be beyond 3 miles.

So that doesn't include Cedar Extension (Central) or Fenn Tower (Cleveland State) or any of the dozen or so that are in downtown.

For the criteria you are looking for, it's accurate to say for Cleveland:

200-foot-plus: 15 (with Lake Park Tower at 327 feet being the tallest)
150-foot-plus: 37
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Old 10-21-2019, 12:02 PM
 
2,704 posts, read 2,994,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
Winton Place has the most stories at 28, but it is listed as being shorter than both Lake Park Tower and Crystal Tower. That may be where the debate is. Btw, agree on both the East Cleveland towers holding up (I think both have been recently renovated). Some of ECs other towers definitely haven't fared as well.

Also, forgot about Crittenden Court but I was thinking 200 plus feet and its listed at 195.
I'd been aware of Crystal Tower years ago but kind of forgot about it recently ... until looking it up per this thread. Not only has it been renovated recently and holding up well, I also noticed, as I hadn't previously, its most-interesting Brutalistic architecture, esp those funky concrete balconies on its northern face. This building would be very at home with the many similar residential high-rises in places like London, among others.
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Old 10-21-2019, 08:56 PM
 
6,766 posts, read 14,016,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
That included all exclusively residential (unless you count Pier W restaurant being below Winton Place in Lakewood) that are located in non downtown, or non downtown extension neighborhoods (West of the Cuyahoga River or east of E. 55th). Of those, the four in Ohio City are within three miles of downtown. I wasn't sure about Hough so looked up Willson Tower (E. 55th and Chester) and it's 2.5 miles. The other two in Hough are at the eastern end of the neighborhood so would be beyond 3 miles.

So that doesn't include Cedar Extension (Central) or Fenn Tower (Cleveland State) or any of the dozen or so that are in downtown.

For the criteria you are looking for, it's accurate to say for Cleveland:

200-foot-plus: 15 (with Lake Park Tower at 327 feet being the tallest)
150-foot-plus: 37
Ok, yeah that sounds about right. I knew your list above included several within 3 miles....per the thread rules they do not count since many cities have those edge districts outside the CBD. Cleveland also has alot of mid century midrises...very close to 10 stories. I am thinking of areas like in Berea around the college, North Olmstead, Lindale, etc.

Lakewood clearly has the most though outside downtown....I can think of 5 or 6 off Detroit Ave, but they are mostly older , not too pretty looking housing, etc.

Last edited by Peter1948; 10-21-2019 at 09:36 PM..
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Old 10-21-2019, 10:10 PM
 
255 posts, read 183,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Ok, yeah that sounds about right. I knew your list above included several within 3 miles....per the thread rules they do not count since many cities have those edge districts outside the CBD. Cleveland also has alot of mid century midrises...very close to 10 stories. I am thinking of areas like in Berea around the college, North Olmstead, Lindale, etc.

Lakewood clearly has the most though outside downtown....I can think of 5 or 6 off Detroit Ave, but they are mostly older , not too pretty looking housing, etc.
Most of Lakewood's are Gold Coast. 9 are true high rises, but probably another 10-plus are in that 10-14 range. Then, yes Lakewood does have a bunch more in to 10 range scattered. I didn't count any of them. But while even the Gold Coast is older, so not new and shiny, everything in Lakewood is going for more than it should. Easily the hottest real estate market outside the urban neighborhoods in the city.

Berea just has two, Quarrytown (senior Public housing) and Tower in the Park that are between 9 and 13 stories. Again, didn't count them.

North Olmsted had the two legit towers (both over 200) and then the next is 9 stories, which I didn't include.

Linndale is a tiny enclave of about 4 blocks of small homes. You probably thought Bellaire Gardens (10 story public housing tower and another smaller mid rise, along with some townhomes) was Linndale. I grew up right across Bellaire Gardens, that's Cleveland for sure But again, didn't count that.

Like I said, you go down to 9-14 stories, there are hundreds of them across Cleveland (and yes almost all mid century when the area had a mid and highrise boom).
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Old 10-23-2019, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,293 posts, read 16,425,431 times
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Providence: Not staggeringly high, but Portsmouth, RI has a 220ft residential tower that is really an outlier for the area. 15 miles as the crow flies from downtown Providence in a quiet, largely low-density suburban town. If it were in Providence itself, it would be tied with the Biltmore for the 10th tallest in the city. Coastal highrises away from urban cores are very common in many parts of the country, but this is weird for New England.


Boston: Boston has the Jamaicaway Tower which is about 320ft and 4 miles from city hall. Borderline for the criteria, but BU has a dorm tower (technically all residential) that's 322 ft. and almost exactly 3.1 miles from city hall. I dated a girl who lived on the 19th floor in college and the view out over the Charles towards downtown was incredible.

Last edited by lrfox; 10-23-2019 at 09:48 AM..
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