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Old 09-30-2019, 07:52 AM
Status: "Freedom - Diversity - Unity" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Mars City
5,452 posts, read 2,332,039 times
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I'm glad I'm not a millennial, trying to understand their views of living and location.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 09-30-2019 at 08:54 AM..
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Old 09-30-2019, 08:50 AM
Status: "Fall is Here!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,599 posts, read 103,766,976 times
Reputation: 33448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
The minimum threshold population to be a viable town has increased, and a lot of small towns aren't doing so well, but the medium sized metros seem to be doing pretty well. Particularly in the midwest, a lot of the fastest growing areas are the smaller / medium cities. For instance in MO, Columbia and Springfield / Branson are growing pretty dang fast while KC and St. Louis are lagging behind. The small towns are declining.




If that were true we'd have more people moving to the north plains area and they would be getting the heck out of Florida.
You mean there's a ton of jobs in the northern plains states?
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Old 09-30-2019, 11:12 AM
 
11,225 posts, read 22,618,364 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
The oldest Millennials are pushing 40 with families now. Sure trends are changing now
This is what I laughed at. Millennials are starting to get up there, they're involved in their careers and are starting families. That's why a lot of them are now "leaving the cities" - they're going to the suburbs to have babies.

There were articles about how Millennials are moving out of Chicago, well yeah, they're having kids are are full adults now. The population of young college educated people in the city is still shooting up because the post-millennials are now finishing college and moving into the large US cities as they're young and unchained.
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Old 09-30-2019, 12:26 PM
 
2,274 posts, read 1,144,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
This is what I laughed at. Millennials are starting to get up there, they're involved in their careers and are starting families. That's why a lot of them are now "leaving the cities" - they're going to the suburbs to have babies.

There were articles about how Millennials are moving out of Chicago, well yeah, they're having kids are are full adults now. The population of young college educated people in the city is still shooting up because the post-millennials are now finishing college and moving into the large US cities as they're young and unchained.
And, before you know it, the post-millennials will be complaining about Millennials, the way they complain about Baby Boomers. What goes around, comes around.
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Old 09-30-2019, 12:38 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,507 posts, read 2,285,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post

And, before you know it, the post-millennials will be complaining about Millennials, the way they complain about Baby Boomers. What goes around, comes around.
I'd imagine Gen X is going to get hit first. Many Millennials have Boomer parents, so that's why the focus has remained Boomer centric. A lot of Gen Z's parents are going to be Gen Xs rather than Millennials (Gen Y).
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Old 09-30-2019, 12:43 PM
 
2,274 posts, read 1,144,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
I'd imagine Gen X is going to get hit first. Many Millennials have Boomer parents, so that's why the focus has remained Boomer centric. A lot of Gen Z's parents are going to be Gen Xs rather than Millennials (Gen Y).
Yes, they will. I haven't heard nasty comments from Gen X, like I have Millennials, though. It will be lovely for those with the mouths and nasty comments, to get their due. I am a Baby Boomer, and have read lots and lots of nasty comments.
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,552 posts, read 26,707,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post

And, before you know it, the post-millennials will be complaining about Millennials, the way they complain about Baby Boomers. What goes around, comes around.
That depends. The Boomer generation was responsible for policy choices that led us to where we are today.

Quote:
To take a personal example, when I was born, in 1976, the gross debt-to-GDP ratio in the U.S. was under 34 per cent, and that was down from a peak of around 120 per cent in World War II. Boomers were an absolute majority of the voting-eligible population in 1982, and even though they began dying, their power consolidated through higher rates of voting participation, the influence of corporate money, the ascension to high office and so on. The debt-to-GDP ratio is now around 105 per cent and on track by the end of the median boomer’s lifetime to be higher than where we were in World War II. So they have completely undone all of the work of the Greatest Generation without having managed to defeat Hitler.

And the national debt is the most explicit debt, but there are all these embedded debts that people don’t discuss—there’s the “deferred” maintenance of U.S. infrastructure, on the order of $4 trillion. There’s the deferred liability of dealing with climate change, which affects not just the U.S. but the world. Systematically, they’ve failed to address any long-term issues, focusing only on present consumption, and that has degraded the foundations of prosperity. I actually think things are going to get a lot worse, but if you’re 65, which is roughly where the median boomer is right now, you’re collecting full social security, and you really don’t care.
https://www.macleans.ca/culture/book...ecked-america/

So it depends on what the Millennial legacy ends up being. The Greatest Generation, despite its flaws, is revered for defeating fascism, putting men into space, pioneering the internet, being relatively good stewards of the environment, etc. Boomers have fallen woefully short of the generation that raised them.
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:35 PM
 
2,274 posts, read 1,144,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
That depends. The Boomer generation was responsible for policy choices that led us to where we are today.



https://www.macleans.ca/culture/book...ecked-america/

So it depends on what the Millennial legacy ends up being. The Greatest Generation, despite its flaws, is revered for defeating fascism, putting men into space, pioneering the internet, being relatively good stewards of the environment, etc. Boomers have fallen woefully short of the generation that raised them.
Nothing good, huh? You do realize Obama is a Baby Boomer, right?

Last edited by Enean; 09-30-2019 at 01:46 PM..
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:44 PM
 
10,637 posts, read 13,321,509 times
Reputation: 6435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
This is what I laughed at. Millennials are starting to get up there, they're involved in their careers and are starting families. That's why a lot of them are now "leaving the cities" - they're going to the suburbs to have babies.

There were articles about how Millennials are moving out of Chicago, well yeah, they're having kids are are full adults now. The population of young college educated people in the city is still shooting up because the post-millennials are now finishing college and moving into the large US cities as they're young and unchained.

Yep, huge surprise that people of child bearing age are moving to places with bigger houses and yards. My question is, are they moving in smaller percentages than past generations.
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,552 posts, read 26,707,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Nothing good, huh?
That's not what I said. I did say that the Boomer legacy is nothing to write home about, and in many ways, they've set the country back. The Greatest Generation and the Silents had their problems too (i.e., racism), but they also had a legacy to be proud of.

In 30 years, I don't think anyone will speak of Boomers with the same reverent tones we speak of the WWII generation. Boomers will mostly be remembered for being hell-bent on deregulation and disemboweling the social contract set in place in the wake of the Depression and the War.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 09-30-2019 at 02:07 PM..
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