U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-02-2019, 08:48 AM
Status: "Freedom - Diversity - Unity" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Mars City
5,451 posts, read 2,344,255 times
Reputation: 8022

Advertisements

Maybe millennials can't handle the big cities. Maybe they don't have what it takes Just go where it's smaller and easier, with less need to grow and learn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-02-2019, 09:18 AM
 
10,644 posts, read 13,333,289 times
Reputation: 6453
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
How did one poster turn this thread into a thread for bashing Baby Boomers?

City Data at it's finest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 09:33 AM
Status: "Fall is Here!" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,657 posts, read 103,822,260 times
Reputation: 33463
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Even on the technological front, it was really the Greatest Generation that was responsible for the most progress with rapid advancements in circuitry and transistors that made the development of the modern computer possible. The earliest mobile computer was actually developed by a member of the Silent Generation, not a Boomer. Most of the pioneers of the internet were also members of the Silent Generation.



Well, it's not like Boomers didn't have that problem too. But if you look at all of the major civil rights legislation and court decisions, it was Boomers and Silents at the forefront.



The median Boomer was born in 1955. They would have been 25 in 1980. Boomers became a majority of the voting age population fairly quickly.



Actually, yes.
OK, I get it. The Boomers are responsible for everything bad that ever happened in this country since the American Revolution. Conversely, the Boomers have invented nothing, accomplished nothing in their adult lives except to birth the Millennials.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 09:35 AM
Status: "Freedom - Diversity - Unity" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Mars City
5,451 posts, read 2,344,255 times
Reputation: 8022
Maybe the boomer-haters really have nothing to offer, and instead can only throw stones. If you guys are so great, show us. We're still waiting, in the midst of our occasional chuckling inside...

I do see a lot of disrespect for elders and those who "came before" on the part of millennials. That goes against centuries of American culture, and even world culture. Looks like you guys are intent on shooting yourselves in the feet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,229 posts, read 16,336,448 times
Reputation: 9621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
The media keep saying this, and yet, the really small cities and towns are getting smaller as people move out.
https://www.npr.org/2018/06/19/61884...o-shrink-smart
It's honestly been touted for decades. While remote work (full or part time) is a possibility for some, including myself, the reality is that most of us still need to spend a chunk of time in the office and interface with human beings. The notion that we'll all be working remotely soon faced a difficult reality as we've learned there are major downsides to telecommuting. Obviously it works for some and the trend will continue, but it's clearly not going to be what people thought it was 20 years ago.

And cities as a "trend" is kind of a ridiculous thought. For starters, cities have been around for millennia. The only slight reversal of this trend, albeit a minor/brief one, was the post WWII era when the proliferation of the automobile changed development and lifestyle patterns for some time and created growth in farther flung suburbs/exurbs. And this is still technically growth of cities since suburbs are a function of cities. While there's truth to common talking points about millennials wanting "urban amenities," there are far more practical realities that have driven the shift back towards more urban living (which I think is still in the early phases, not a waning trend like some claim):
  1. Employment. With the decline of small-town manufacturing, agriculture, and the rural economy (apart from service based/tourism) in general, most major employers are located in cities because, well, that's where the talent is. It's not likely that a company like Apple, Amazon, Google, etc. is going to open up shop in a rural community 100 miles from the nearest metro of size. The infrastructure doesn't exist to accommodate the workforce. A town of 5,000 in the middle of nowhere can't all of a sudden accommodate 25,000 new employees. There aren't enough homes, roads, services, etc. Even major cities have trouble accommodating that type of growth. This is to say nothing of things like major airports which any global company will want access to, or general niceties and amenities that people want (entertainment, dining, shopping, etc.). Employment centers are going to cluster in cities. With few exceptions, if you want a skilled or high paying job, you're going to have to move closer to a city.
  2. Traffic. Autocentric development for 1/2 a century or more has lead to a drastic uptick in car dependency and major traffic issues in cities across the country. And it's not sustainable. Cars are not and have never been an efficient way to get around when thinking of the big picture. It's not getting better, and we can't make significant capacity increases to our most congested roadways. So even people who want to live in nice quiet suburbs and farther flung areas have to compromise because traffic in many cities is at a point where the time (and money) wasted sitting in it is no longer tolerable for many. There will always be an equilibrium of sorts on this front, but that tipping point (i.e. 1 hour MAX commute) is shifting closer to city centers as traffic gets worse and extends further away from city centers. So people are looking to be closer to town not necessarily because it's cool/hip, but because they can't deal with a 2 hour drive each direction every day.
  3. The slow adaptation of telecommuting. For most of us, telecommuting full time from anywhere we want to live is not a possibility. There is a slowly growing number of people who are able to do it, but there is a bigger and growing number who cannot. The shortcomings of telecommuting - isolation, lack of face to face interaction and associated benefits, lack of productivity, etc. - meant hat people have to and will continue to have to locate near employment centers which will reinforce points 1 and 2 for a long time coming.

So cities aren't going anywhere. As long as people physically report to work (which they will for a long time), cities will continue to grow. And as long as highway capacities remain finite, people will look to live where they are either close to work or are not dependent on a car to get them there. It's not just about what's cool/trendy for millennials.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,572 posts, read 26,727,148 times
Reputation: 11951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Oh, Jeez! For starts, most Boomers are still working! The youngest, b. 1964, are 55 years old and have about 12 years left in the workforce. Secondly, how is the country worse now than it was in 2009, when the last of the silents turned 65y, 10 mo, the age of full retirement at the time? Why, I believe we were in a pretty bad recession at the time. Talk about leaving the country worse off than when they received it! Should be we blame it on them? Why not?
The Silent Generation was "skipped over" in a sense. It was a numerically small generational cohort. We've never even had a president from the Silent Generation. They never had the political influence the Boomers had.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 10:36 AM
 
2,284 posts, read 1,151,092 times
Reputation: 2938
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The Silent Generation was "skipped over" in a sense. It was a numerically small generational cohort. We've never even had a president from the Silent Generation. They never had the political influence the Boomers had.
And, still continue to have (Obama, etc.).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,025 posts, read 7,995,669 times
Reputation: 8013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
Maybe millennials can't handle the big cities. Maybe they don't have what it takes Just go where it's smaller and easier, with less need to grow and learn.
Bigger cities are pretty culturally and spiritually dead these days. Grim indeed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 12:35 PM
Status: "Fall is Here!" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,657 posts, read 103,822,260 times
Reputation: 33463
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The Silent Generation was "skipped over" in a sense. It was a numerically small generational cohort. We've never even had a president from the Silent Generation. They never had the political influence the Boomers had.
Oh, give it a REST!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2019, 02:09 PM
 
7,766 posts, read 9,624,650 times
Reputation: 9225
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The Silent Generation was "skipped over" in a sense. It was a numerically small generational cohort. We've never even had a president from the Silent Generation. They never had the political influence the Boomers had.
They tried, but Walter Mondale ( b. 1928) and Michael Dukakis ( b. 1933) didn't quite make it. Ironically, we've had two Presidents from the 1st year of the Baby Boom ( 1946)--George Bush, Jr and Bill Clinton. Obama was also a Baby Boomer (b. 1961), but towards the end of the Boom.

No one, yet, from the 1950s, the main branch of the Boom...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top