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Old 09-29-2019, 08:44 AM
 
547 posts, read 213,390 times
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I was recently in Toronto and I noticed how integrated all the races are, and it is no small feat, as it is certainly one of the most multicultural in the world. There is a balanced mix of Whites, Blacks, Asians, Middle Eastern people (I don't think too many Hispanics though)... and many seemingly live in the same neighborhoods throughout the region in places such as Scarborough, North York, Mississauga. I have also been to Montreal and Vancouver, they are not as racially diverse as Toronto but still pretty multicultural and integrated (I think Vancouver is a little more segregated than the others though).

This is in contrast to American cities, where people generally live in the same neighborhood as their race. There are some exceptions like parts of Oakland, parts of Queens NYC, but for sure Canada cities have US ones beat in "racial integration". In most American big cities you know if you stepped into the "Black" or "Hispanic" or "White" part of town. In places like Chicago and Atlanta and SF Bay Area, you don't even need to "step" into town, if you take the subway, you will often know the direction the train is heading based on the people you see on the train.

Factors? Besides the link between crime rates and minority groups in the US.
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Old 09-29-2019, 09:21 AM
 
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https://demographics.virginia.edu/DotMap/index.html

I think everyone should check this out. It's fun and easy to use and very insightful.

From what I can gather, some of the most integrated U.S. cities are (in no particular order)

Sacramento, CA
Lansing, MI
Houston, TX
Albuquerque, NM
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Old 09-29-2019, 10:28 AM
 
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Canada has a mixed record when it comes to race relations.

While Canada was a refuge for a lot of former slaves and free blacks who didn't want to stay in America, Canada also struggles with trying to make reparations towards the populations that it harmed in the past. There are still a lot of issues to be worked out with their Native American population (for example). However, Canada didn't have all the race issues that America had either (one drop rule, Jim Crow, decades of large-scale slavery).

And even though Canada has a lot of land, a lot of it is undeveloped and their population doesn't have the numbers that we do in America. It's simply not as built up as America is. Finally, the cities have a lot more immigrants than the countryside. And recently, they've become a lighting rod for immigrants who want to bypass the US because of Trump's immigration policies.

But I do notice the same things as you when it comes to American and Canadian cities. Americans are much more concerned about living with their people/racial group and in the "right" neighborhood/section of town.
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Old 09-29-2019, 11:48 AM
Status: "Fall is Here!" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,680 posts, read 103,835,998 times
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I would suggest reading this Canadian publication before assuming everything is rosy in Canada wrt race relations, particularly with regard to black Canadians.
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia....ople-in-canada

Here's another: Black History Canada - End of Segregation in Canada

That the Canadian government calls minorities "visible" minorities, meaning you can see that they're not white, is very telling.

I'd like to see some documentation that there is less racial segregation in housing in Canada's big cities.
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Old 09-29-2019, 11:52 AM
 
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Some US cities have a lot of generally race-specific neighborhoods. Others tend to be more mixed. Sites that represent categories by dots show this.
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Old 09-29-2019, 12:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I would suggest reading this Canadian publication before assuming everything is rosy in Canada wrt race relations, particularly with regard to black Canadians.
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia....ople-in-canada

Here's another: Black History Canada - End of Segregation in Canada

That the Canadian government calls minorities "visible" minorities, meaning you can see that they're not white, is very telling.

I'd like to see some documentation that there is less racial segregation in housing in Canada's big cities.
This...I suggest the OP to look up Halifax’s North End and some of Nova Scotia’s black communities like the Prestons(North and East), Cherrybrook, Upper Big Tracadie, Hammond Plains, Beechville, etc.
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Old 10-04-2019, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Some ignorance here on what the purpose of " visible minority " means in Canada. Applying US standards and methods to Canada, fails sometimes.

The majority of people in Canada are white. The purpose of classifying other groups as visible, as opposed to non-visible minorities, was to create more equality as per the Employment Equity Act .

https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/....html#h-215132

There is and was no malice.

In fact, aboriginal Canadians, are not classified as visible minority, since they have their own classification. So it's not ALL about being non-white.

The only " telling " thing, is that in Canada the federal government was addressing issues regarding employment and race.

Last edited by Natnasci; 10-04-2019 at 02:19 PM..
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Old 10-05-2019, 10:15 AM
 
1,485 posts, read 1,084,858 times
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I would say it is basically 2 or 3 factors:
1) Canada never has slavery/JimCrow so there was never a large minority population that was kept segregated by policy. Sure Canada shared the US's history of mistreatment toward indigenous and immigration policies that effectively excluded non-Europeans. But, there is no Canadian analogue to the African-American experience.

Major racial diversity in Canada is a more recent factor and driven by immigration policy.
Canada has a more "skill based" approach to immigration than the US. I think this impacts integration is two specific ways:
2) Canadian immigrants and their 2nd gen children tend to be closer socioeconomically to their white counterparts. So that encourages more integration.
3) Canadian immigrants are more diverse especially by language than US immigrants. The bigger an immigrant block the more likely members are to maintain things like language. For as diverse, multi-cultural as Toronto is there is no analog to Spanish in major US cities.

Last edited by jpdivola; 10-05-2019 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 10-05-2019, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,284 posts, read 740,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdivola View Post
I would say it is basically 2 or 3 factors:
1) Canada never has slavery/JimCrow so there was never a large minority population that was kept segregated by policy. Sure Canada shared the US's history of mistreatment toward indigenous and immigration policies that effectively excluded non-Europeans. But, there is no Canadian analogue to the African-American experience.

Major racial diversity in Canada is a more recent factor and driven by immigration policy.
Canada has a more "skill based" approach to immigration than the US. I think this impacts integration is two specific ways:
2) Canadian immigrants and their 2nd gen children tend to be closer socioeconomically to their white counterparts. So that encourages more integration.
3) Canadian immigrants are more diverse especially by language than US immigrants. The bigger an immigrant block the more likely members are to maintain things like language. For as diverse, multi-cultural as Toronto is there is no analog to Spanish in major US cities.

Put the drugs down.
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Old 10-05-2019, 03:40 PM
 
58,091 posts, read 82,716,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdivola View Post
I would say it is basically 2 or 3 factors:
1) Canada never has slavery/JimCrow so there was never a large minority population that was kept segregated by policy. Sure Canada shared the US's history of mistreatment toward indigenous and immigration policies that effectively excluded non-Europeans. But, there is no Canadian analogue to the African-American experience.

Major racial diversity in Canada is a more recent factor and driven by immigration policy.
Canada has a more "skill based" approach to immigration than the US. I think this impacts integration is two specific ways:
2) Canadian immigrants and their 2nd gen children tend to be closer socioeconomically to their white counterparts. So that encourages more integration.
3) Canadian immigrants are more diverse especially by language than US immigrants. The bigger an immigrant block the more likely members are to maintain things like language. For as diverse, multi-cultural as Toronto is there is no analog to Spanish in major US cities.
Not true and look at my post above. Actually, the vast majority of those black people in those communities descend from these people: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Loyalist

https://novascotia.ca/museum/blackloyalists/who.htm

Not just Nova Scotia, but parts of New Brunswick, southern Ontario and even Charlottetown Prince Edward Island's the Bog neighborhood; the Eastern Townships of Quebec, parts of Victoria and Vancouver British Columbia; Maidstone Saskachewan, Amber Valley in Alberta, Little Burgundy in Montreal and Toronto neighborhoods St. John's Ward(now part of its Downtown: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ward,_Toronto ) and Alexandra Park are all areas where there was/is an African American presence and history in Canada.
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